Special Issue "Selected Papers from Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2020"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Teen­-Hang Meen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan
Interests: photovoltaic device; dye-sensitized solar cells; nanotechnology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Chun-Yen Chang
Website
Guest Editor
Director of Science Education Center, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
Interests: STEM education; digital learning; science education
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 3rd Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2020 (ECEI 2020; http://www.ecei.asia ) will be held in Ha Long Bay, Vietnam on February 5–February 7, 2020. It will provide a communication platform for researchers on the topic of educational innovations. This conference aims to enable interdisciplinary collaboration between educators and experts from other areas in the academic and industrial fields, as well as international networking. Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102) is a scholarly, international, open-access journal. It publishes extended full-length research papers that have the scope to substantively address current issues in education sciences, and encourages researchers to publish their experimental and theoretical research relating to education sciences. This Special Issue "Selected Papers from Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2020" invites high-quality papers from ECEI 2020 on the topic of education science. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Educational administration and educational management;
  • Educational philosophy and theory of education;
  • Educational history;
  • Educational policy;
  • Curriculum studies;
  • Educational technology systems;
  • Educational technology;
  • Learning and teaching;
  • Pedagogies;
  • Sociology of education;
  • Special education;
  • Teacher education;
  • Testing and evaluation.

Prof. Teen­-Hang Meen
Prof. Charles Tijus
Prof. Chun-Yen Chang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • education science
  • educational technology systems
  • learning and teaching

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Qualitative Study of the Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Macao Students in Mainland China
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(5), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10050128 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
Education research is increasingly paying attention to students’ cross-cultural adaption in Mainland China. As a special administrative region of China, educational systems and language of instruction of Macao are different from those of Mainland China. This study analyzes the cross-cultural adaptation of Macao [...] Read more.
Education research is increasingly paying attention to students’ cross-cultural adaption in Mainland China. As a special administrative region of China, educational systems and language of instruction of Macao are different from those of Mainland China. This study analyzes the cross-cultural adaptation of Macao students in Mainland China by using qualitative semi-structured interviews. The results show that study motivation, medium of instruction, and social integration are important factors determining how Macao students adapt to university programs. Failure to adapt to the language of instruction is the most direct, prominent, and enduring problem that Macao students encounter when studying in the Mainland. The current study’s findings have practical implications for faculties who provide support and training to Macao students in Mainland China. The study discovers that strengthening the Mandarin language skills of Macao students is currently a priority. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Development and Application of a Novel Engineering-Based Maker Education Course for Pre-Service Teachers
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(5), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10050126 - 28 Apr 2020
Abstract
This study aimed to raise awareness of maker education for pre-service teachers and discuss maker education in their major subjects by developing and applying a maker education course for pre-service teachers with various majors based on novel engineering (NE), a teaching and learning [...] Read more.
This study aimed to raise awareness of maker education for pre-service teachers and discuss maker education in their major subjects by developing and applying a maker education course for pre-service teachers with various majors based on novel engineering (NE), a teaching and learning method that combines humanities and engineering. Accordingly, the course was developed following the procedure of the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (ADDIE) model, and the educational effectiveness was investigated using test tools. The educational effect and difficulties were also examined through the analysis of reflective journals written by 20 pre-service teachers with various majors who participated in the course. To investigate the educational effectiveness of the developed course, the science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) literacy of the participants—before and after the course—was measured, with the results demonstrating a statistically significant improvement. Analysis of the reflective journals identified a recognition of sharing effectiveness, the joy of making, and an in-depth understanding of maker education as education effects, and a lack of understanding of techniques, the burden of prototype fabrication, and the limitation of majoring subjects as difficulties experienced during the activities. This study verified that NE could be used as a significant maker education measure for pre-service teachers with various majors. Based on this verification, this study also proposes a strategy to develop more effective NE-based maker education. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Preliminary Study of the Influence of Game Types on the Learning Interests of Primary School Students in Digital Games
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10040096 - 03 Apr 2020
Abstract
Learning is mainly based on the students’ mental activities. If they can learn spontaneously, it will help increase their interest and the effectiveness of the learning. Learning through playing will make it easier for students to learn spontaneously. The balance between gameplay and [...] Read more.
Learning is mainly based on the students’ mental activities. If they can learn spontaneously, it will help increase their interest and the effectiveness of the learning. Learning through playing will make it easier for students to learn spontaneously. The balance between gameplay and education in educational games is a key issue in designing such games. Designing educational games to be less complex and more casual makes it easier to balance education and entertainment. For courses with practical operational characteristics, combining a game with a virtual and real integration experience can increase both student interest and learning effectiveness. This research develops an augmented reality app, named "Mobile Plant", which is an app developed for the primary school plant curriculum, combining games and augmented reality to enhance students’ interest in learning. A questionnaire shows that the game has positive results in terms of game difficulty and absorption of content. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Educational Needs Related to, and Perceptions of the Importance of, Essential Job Competencies among Science and Engineering Graduates
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10040085 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The goal of this study was to identify perceptions of the importance and needs of the essential job competencies required by Korean science and engineering graduates in the context of actual workplaces. We analyzed data from the 11th Youth Panel using the paired [...] Read more.
The goal of this study was to identify perceptions of the importance and needs of the essential job competencies required by Korean science and engineering graduates in the context of actual workplaces. We analyzed data from the 11th Youth Panel using the paired t-test, the Borich needs assessment, and the locus for focus model. An important finding was that the science and engineering graduates recognized the competencies pertaining to working with others and professional competencies as important among 15 essential competencies. We also found that they prioritized competencies differently depending on specific departments: the science graduates prioritized professional competencies, but the engineering graduates placed relatively greater importance on the competencies relating to interacting with others. Through this study, we identified the educational needs for essential job competencies from the science and engineering graduates and suggested implications for corresponding educational approaches. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Analysis of Students’ Cognitive Bias in Experimental Activities Following a Lab Manual
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10030080 - 20 Mar 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to develop a thinking process model that reveals cognitive bias through analyzing students’ cognitive biases in processing experimental manuals. Twenty-two college students participated in the study. During the “making electromagnets” experimental activity, we collected students’ concurrent verbal [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to develop a thinking process model that reveals cognitive bias through analyzing students’ cognitive biases in processing experimental manuals. Twenty-two college students participated in the study. During the “making electromagnets” experimental activity, we collected students’ concurrent verbal protocols, gaze positions, and experimental behaviors. After the experiment, we collected their retrospective verbal protocols and ensured reliability by diversifying the data. The collected data were analyzed inductively using the grounded theory methodology. The results showed that four categories of paradigm (causal conditions, phenomena, interactions, and contextual conditions) and fifteen concepts were derived. Students displayed bias in following the manual instructions due to the influence of causal conditions. When embodying biased representations as workspace entities, biased responses come from the influence of contextual conditions. Therefore, these can be developed in consideration of causal and contextual conditions when developing a manual, thereby reducing cognitive bias among students, and ultimately helping them perform accurate experiments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Pilot Study to Incorporate Collaboration and Energy Competency into an Engineering Ethics Course
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10030072 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
According to the OECD, The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and other education policy experts all over the world, an urgent reform is needed to promote education innovation with “competencies” as the core. To investigate the feasibility to apply competency-oriented education, this [...] Read more.
According to the OECD, The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and other education policy experts all over the world, an urgent reform is needed to promote education innovation with “competencies” as the core. To investigate the feasibility to apply competency-oriented education, this pilot study surveyed the competencies of “collaboration” and “energy” and applied competency-oriented contents into an Engineering Ethics course in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The literature reveals that collaboration includes three constructs: trust, communication, and coordination. These constructs were used to develop a questionnaire and to survey the collaboration competency of the research subjects. In addition, an energy perception survey for Taiwan was used to compare and analyze the energy competencies between the research subject and the general adults in Taiwan. Finally, some suggestions are proposed for competency implementation in future courses. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Detecting Mind-Wandering from Eye Movement and Oculomotor Data during Learning Video Lecture
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10030051 - 28 Feb 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to detect mind-wandering experienced by pre-service teachers during a video learning lecture on physics. The lecture was videotaped and consisted of a live lecture in a classroom. The lecture was about Gauss's law on physics. We investigated [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to detect mind-wandering experienced by pre-service teachers during a video learning lecture on physics. The lecture was videotaped and consisted of a live lecture in a classroom. The lecture was about Gauss's law on physics. We investigated whether oculomotor data and eye movements could be used as a marker to indicate the learner’s mind-wandering. Each data was collected in a study in which 24 pre-service teachers (16 females and 8 males) reported mind-wandering experience through self-caught method while learning physics video lecture during 30 minutes. A Tobii Pro Spectrum (sampling rate: 300 Hz) was used to capture their eye-gaze during learning Gauss's law through a course video. After watching the video lecture, we interviewed pre-service teachers about their mind-wandering experience. We first used the self-caught method to capture the mind-wandering timing of pre-service teachers while learning from video lectures. We detected more accurate mind-wandering segments by comparing fixation duration and saccade count. We investigated two types of oculomotor data (blink count, pupil size) and nine eye movements (average peak velocity of saccades; maximum peak velocity of saccades; standard deviation of peak velocity of saccades; average amplitude of saccades; maximum amplitude of saccades; total amplitude of saccades; saccade count/s; fixation duration; fixation dispersion). The result was that the blink count could not be used as a marker for mind-wandering during learning video lectures among them (oculomotor data and eye movements), unlike previous literatures. Based on the results of this study, we identified elements that can be used as mind-wandering markers while learning from video lectures that are similar to real classes, among the oculomotor data and eye movement mentioned in previous literatures. Additionally, we found that most participants focused on past thoughts and felt unpleasant after experiencing mind-wandering through interview analysis. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Element Enterprise Tycoon: Playing Board Games to Learn Chemistry in Daily Life
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10030048 - 26 Feb 2020
Abstract
This article reports the design of a scientific board game, named “Element Enterprise Tycoon” (EET), which creates a scenario combining chemical elements, techniques, and products in daily life. The game cards are designed to motivate students not only to retrieve information about chemical [...] Read more.
This article reports the design of a scientific board game, named “Element Enterprise Tycoon” (EET), which creates a scenario combining chemical elements, techniques, and products in daily life. The game cards are designed to motivate students not only to retrieve information about chemical elements, but also to be proficient in chemistry. Moreover, the game creates opportunities for group interactions and competitions to engage students in learning chemical elements as they do in regular science curricula. The EET has been field-tested with a group of middle school students to evaluate its applicability. Empirical data show that students improve their understanding of chemistry concepts with a median level of effect size. In particular, students achieve better performance in terms of chemistry-related technique concepts. The follow-up interviews reflect students’ positive feedback and attitudes toward science learning through board game playing and their willingness to continue to play the game. It is suggested that learning through science games can indeed help students learn new chemical knowledge. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Children’s Interest in Learning English Through Picture Books in an EFL Context: The Effects of Parent–Child Interaction and Digital Pen Use
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10020040 - 13 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In recent years, the ways in which to read English picture books to young children has become diverse in English as a foreign language (EFL) context. The present study examined the effect of parent-child interactions and digital pen use during English picture book [...] Read more.
In recent years, the ways in which to read English picture books to young children has become diverse in English as a foreign language (EFL) context. The present study examined the effect of parent-child interactions and digital pen use during English picture book reading in the child’s interest in learning English. A total of 320 Korean mothers of three to five year old preschool children participated in the study. The results revealed the following. First, children’s interest in learning English was higher when they used digital pens and engaged in frequent parent-child interactions during English picture book reading. Second, parent-child interaction was a more significant variable in children’s interest in learning English compared to digital pen use. Third, the moderator effect of digital pen use in the relation between parent-children interaction and children’s interest in learning English was insignificant. In other words, parent-child interaction was important in increasing children’s interest in learning English, regardless of digital pen use. While rapid advances in technology enhanced teaching pedagogy, parent-child interaction in foreign language learning still remains as a crucial factor. Further implications and future directions are discussed. Full article
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Open AccessCase Report
The Design of Applying Gamification in an Immersive Virtual Reality Virtual Laboratory for Powder-Bed Binder Jetting 3DP Training
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10070172 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The integration of Virtual Reality (VR) and gamification techniques can be used to produce a fun virtual laboratory, including virtual spaces and educational content. This study developed a prototype for a virtual laboratory for powder-bed binder jetting three-dimensional printing (3DP) training in universities. [...] Read more.
The integration of Virtual Reality (VR) and gamification techniques can be used to produce a fun virtual laboratory, including virtual spaces and educational content. This study developed a prototype for a virtual laboratory for powder-bed binder jetting three-dimensional printing (3DP) training in universities. The 3DP virtual laboratory is expected to address problems encountered in teaching, training, and practicing with powder-bed binder jetting 3DP. The 3DP Training Virtual Laboratory was developed by using immersive VR technology to simulate two-handed operations. The user evaluation of the first version prototype revealed that the students lacked learning interest and motivation when using the prototype. Thus, gamification technology was integrated into the 3DP virtual laboratory prototype in the mid-implementation development phase. After refining and systematically developing the model to meet the modified requirements, user evaluations on the game elements showed positive feedback. This study concluded that elements of gamification design should be considered at the beginning of the educational or training system development in order to enhance students’ motivation or engagement. Full article
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