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Special Issue "Clinical Medicine for Healthcare and Sustainability"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology & Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Teen­Hang Meen

Chair of IEEE Tainan Section Sensors Council Department of Electronic Engineering National Formosa University, Yunlin 632
Website | E-Mail
Interests: photovoltaic device; dye-sensitized solar cells; nanotechnology
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yusuke Matsumoto

Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-city Tokyo 192-0392, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: computerization of pharmacy business; drug therapy for renal excretory drugs; eradication therapy of Hericobacter pylori
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kuan-Han Lee

College of Pharmacy and Science, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: medicinal chemistry; organic synthesis; computer-aided drug design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 2019 IEEE Eurasia Conference on Biomedical Engineering, Healthcare, and Sustainability (IEEE ECBIOS 2019) will be held in Okinawa, Japan between 31 May and 3 June 2019, which will provide a unified communication platform for researchers in the topics of biomedical engineering, healthcare, and sustainability. Recently, healthcare has undergone a sector-wide transformation thanks to advances in computing, networking technologies, big data, and artificial intelligence. Healthcare is not only changing from reactive and hospital-centered to preventive and personalized but is also changing from disease focused to well-being centered. Healthcare systems, as well as fundamental medicine research, are becoming smarter and more enabled in biomedical engineering. Furthermore, with cutting edge sensors and computer technologies, healthcare delivery could also yield better efficiency, higher quality, and lower cost.

In this Special Issue, we expect to select excellent papers presented in IEEE ECBIOS 2019 and other high-quality papers concerning the topics clinical medicine, healthcare, and sustainability. It provides a platform for advances in health care/clinical practices and the study of the direct observation of patients and general medical research.

Prof. Dr. Teen­-Hang Meen
Prof. Dr. Yusuke Matsumoto
Prof. Dr. Kuan-Han Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomedical engineering
  • Healthcare
  • Sustainability
  • Networking technologies
  • Big data
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Personalized therapy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Association between Serum Urate and Risk of Hypertension in Menopausal Women with XDH Gene
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 738; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050738
Received: 10 April 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 20 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
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Abstract
Elevated serum urate (sUA) concentrations have been associated with an increased risk of hypertension. We aimed to examine the association of sUA concentration on the risk of hypertension in pre- and post-menopausal women and investigated the association between the polymorphism of the xanthine [...] Read more.
Elevated serum urate (sUA) concentrations have been associated with an increased risk of hypertension. We aimed to examine the association of sUA concentration on the risk of hypertension in pre- and post-menopausal women and investigated the association between the polymorphism of the xanthine dehydrogenase gene and the risk of hypertension. Among 7294 women, 1415 premenopausal and 5879 postmenopausal women were recruited. Anthropometric parameters as risk factors of hypertension were identify by logistic regression models. In addition, we investigated an association between xanthine dehydrogenase gene and sUA and their combined associations on the risk of hypertension. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were significantly increased in accordance to the increase of sUA levels (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed postmenopausal women with a high sUA and high BMI were 3.18 times more likely to have hypertension than in those with normal and lower sUA (Odds ratio: 3.18, 95% confidence interval: 2.54–3.96). Postmenopausal women with a high WC were 1.62 times more likely to have hypertension than in those with normal and lower sUA. Subjects with the AG genotype of rs206860 was found to be at lower risk of hypertension (odd ratio: 0.287, 95% confidence interval: 0.091–0.905, p = 0.033). This cross-sectional study indicated a high sUA is associated with a higher risk of hypertension in postmenopausal women. Further well-designed prospective studies in other populations are warranted to validate our results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Medicine for Healthcare and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Preoperative Health-Related Quality of Life Predicts Minimal Clinically Important Difference and Survival after Surgical Resection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 576; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050576
Received: 23 February 2019 / Revised: 13 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 27 April 2019
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Abstract
Despite the growing use of minimal clinically important difference (MCID) as a cancer outcome measure, no study has reported clinically significant outcomes in cancer patients. We defined MCID and evaluated the use of preoperative HRQoL for predicting MCID and survival after surgical resection [...] Read more.
Despite the growing use of minimal clinically important difference (MCID) as a cancer outcome measure, no study has reported clinically significant outcomes in cancer patients. We defined MCID and evaluated the use of preoperative HRQoL for predicting MCID and survival after surgical resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In total, 369 patients completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep) and the SF-36 at baseline and at two years post-operative at three tertiary academic hospitals. The corresponding MCID values were 3.6 (SF-36 physical component summary), 4.2 (SF-36 mental component summary), 5.4 (FACT-General total score), and 6.7 (FACT-Hep total score). The predictors of achieving postoperative MCID were significantly higher in patients who had low preoperative HRQoL score, advanced age, high education level, and high BMI (p < 0.05). However, patients with a high preoperative HRQoL score, high education level, high BMI, and low Charlson comorbidity index score were significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05). Preoperative HRQoL scores were predictive of MCID and overall survival after surgical resection of HCC. The findings of this study may be useful for managing the preoperative expectations of candidates for HCC resection and for developing shared decision-making procedures for patients undergoing surgical resection of HCC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Medicine for Healthcare and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Re-Evaluating the Protective Effect of Hemodialysis Catheter Locking Solutions in Hemodialysis Patients
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(3), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8030412
Received: 5 March 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 20 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
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Abstract
Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) and exit-site infections (ESIs) are common complications associated with the use of central venous catheters for hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of routine locking solutions on the incidence of CRBSI and ESI, in [...] Read more.
Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) and exit-site infections (ESIs) are common complications associated with the use of central venous catheters for hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of routine locking solutions on the incidence of CRBSI and ESI, in preserving catheter function, and on the rate of all-cause mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. We selected publications (from inception until July 2018) with studies comparing locking solutions for hemodialysis catheters used in patients undergoing hemodialysis. A total of 21 eligible studies were included, with a total of 4832 patients and 318,769 days of catheter use. The incidence of CRBSI and ESI was significantly lower in the treated group (citrate-based regimen) than in the controls (heparin-based regimen). No significant difference in preserving catheter function and all-cause mortality was found between the two groups. Our findings demonstrated that routine locking solutions for hemodialysis catheters effectively reduce the incidence of CRBSIs and ESIs, but our findings failed to show a benefit for preserving catheter function and mortality rates. Therefore, further studies are urgently needed to conclusively evaluate the impact of routine locking solutions on preserving catheter function and improving the rates of all-cause mortality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Medicine for Healthcare and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Predictors of Discordance in the Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Mass between Computed Tomography and Bioimpedance Analysis
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(3), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8030322
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 March 2019 / Published: 7 March 2019
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Abstract
Computed tomography (CT) and bioimpedance analysis (BIA) can assess skeletal muscle mass (SMM). Our objective was to identify the predictors of discordance between CT and BIA in assessing SMM. Participants who received a comprehensive medical health check-up between 2010 and 2018 were recruited. [...] Read more.
Computed tomography (CT) and bioimpedance analysis (BIA) can assess skeletal muscle mass (SMM). Our objective was to identify the predictors of discordance between CT and BIA in assessing SMM. Participants who received a comprehensive medical health check-up between 2010 and 2018 were recruited. The CT and BIA-based diagnostic criteria for low SMM are as follows: Defined CT cutoff values (lumbar skeletal muscle index (LSMI) <1 standard deviation (SD) and means of 46.12 cm2/m2 for men and 34.18 cm2/m2 for women) and defined BIA cutoff values (appendicular skeletal muscle/height2 <7.0 kg/m2 for men and <5.7 kg/m2 for women). A total of 1163 subjects were selected. The crude and body mass index (BMI)-adjusted SMM assessed by CT were significantly associated with those assessed by BIA (correlation coefficient = 0.78 and 0.68, respectively; p < 0.001). The prevalence of low SMM was 15.1% by CT and 16.4% by BIA. Low SMM diagnosed by CT was significantly associated with advanced age, female gender, and lower serum albumin level, whereas low SMM diagnosed by BIA was significantly associated with advanced age, female gender, and lower BMI (all p < 0.05). Upon multivariate analysis, age >65 years, female and BMI <25 kg/m2 had significantly higher risks of discordance than their counterparts (all p < 0.05). We found a significant association between SMM assessed by CT and BIA. SMM assessment using CT and BIA should be interpreted cautiously in older adults (>65 years of age), female and BMI <25 kg/m2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Medicine for Healthcare and Sustainability)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Patient Experience in Home Respiratory Therapies: Where We Are and Where to Go
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 555; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040555
Received: 5 March 2019 / Revised: 22 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
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Abstract
The increasing number of patients receiving home respiratory therapy (HRT) is imposing a major impact on routine clinical care and healthcare system sustainability. The current challenge is to continue to guarantee access to HRT while maintaining the quality of care. The patient experience [...] Read more.
The increasing number of patients receiving home respiratory therapy (HRT) is imposing a major impact on routine clinical care and healthcare system sustainability. The current challenge is to continue to guarantee access to HRT while maintaining the quality of care. The patient experience is a cornerstone of high-quality healthcare and an emergent area of clinical research. This review approaches the assessment of the patient experience in the context of HRT while highlighting the European contribution to this body of knowledge. This review demonstrates that research in this area is still limited, with no example of a prescription model that incorporates the patient experience as an outcome and no specific patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) available. This work also shows that Europe is leading the research on HRT provision. The development of a specific PREM and the integration of PREMs into the assessment of prescription models should be clinical research priorities in the next several years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Medicine for Healthcare and Sustainability)
J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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