Special Issue "Selected Papers from the Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2019"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Teen­-Hang Meen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan
Interests: photovoltaic device; dye-sensitized solar cells; nanotechnology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Chun-Yen Chang
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Director of Science Education Center, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
Interests: STEM education; digital learning; science education
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 2nd Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2019 (ECEI 2019; http://2019.ecei.asia) will be held in Singapore on 27–29 January 2019, and will provide a communication platform for researchers on the topic of educational innovations. This conference aims to enable interdisciplinary collaboration between educators and experts from other areas in the academic and industrial fields as well as international networking. Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102) is a scholarly international open access journal. It publishes extended full-length research papers that have the scope to substantively address current issues in the education sciences, and encourages researchers to publish their experimental and theoretical research relating to the education sciences. This Special Issue "Selected Papers from Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2019" will invite excellent papers from ECEI 2019 on topics related to the scope of Education Sciences. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • educational administration and educational management;
  • educational philosophy and theory of education;
  • educational history;
  • educational policy;
  • curriculum studies;
  • educational technology systems;
  • educational technology;
  • learning and teaching;
  • pedagogies;
  • sociology of education;
  • special education;
  • teacher education;
  • testing and evaluation.

Prof. Teen­Hang Meen
Prof. Charles Tijus
Prof. Chun-Yen Chang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • education science
  • educational technology systems
  • learning and teaching

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Selected Papers from the Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2019
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030218 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
The Second Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2019 (ECEI 2019) was held in Singapore on 27–29 January 2019, and provided a communication platform for researchers on the topic of educational innovations [...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Undergraduates’ Out-Of-Class Learning: Exploring EFL Students’ Autonomous Learning Behaviors and Their Usage of Resources
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030159 - 26 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Educational research is increasingly paying attention to students’ out-of-class learning. Students’ out-of-class learning is linked to improved class performance and constitutes an important part of learner development. Prior research has argued that learning-resources provision should encourage students’ autonomous learning both in and out [...] Read more.
Educational research is increasingly paying attention to students’ out-of-class learning. Students’ out-of-class learning is linked to improved class performance and constitutes an important part of learner development. Prior research has argued that learning-resources provision should encourage students’ autonomous learning both in and out of the classroom [Benson, 2013; Benson & Reinders, 2011; Gardner & Miller, 1999; Little, 1997; Richards, 2015]. However, work on autonomy often proceeds via generalities rather than focusing on its enactment in individual behavior. Accordingly, this study investigated 35 EFL undergraduates’ autonomous learning behaviors and their use of resources of the learning center of a university. Data were collected via email interviews with the participants and examination of their resources-usage records. Content analysis of the interview data, using six categories based on a learner-autonomy model, was used to generate each participant’s autonomy score. Spearman rho testing of the relationship between those scores and the students’ resources-usage scores suggested a very strong positive relationship between autonomous learning behaviors and overall usage of resources, as well as the variety of those resources used by individuals. Data analysis also revealed that, to varying degrees, each participant’s autonomous-learning behaviors (based on qualitative examples) fell into more than one of the six learner-autonomy types. Based on these findings, it is recommended that students be encouraged to learn beyond the classroom through pedagogical activities that link classroom learning to learning-center resources. Based on the findings of this study we make suggestions on pedagogical design with SAC and applications for SACs in other educational contexts. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Study on the Attractiveness Factors of Online Courses
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9020128 - 10 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
With the rapid development of online courses, digital learning has become a global trend. In this context, this study analyzed the high intake population of online courses for online affective cognition, and explored what the user’s attraction factors for online courses are. The [...] Read more.
With the rapid development of online courses, digital learning has become a global trend. In this context, this study analyzed the high intake population of online courses for online affective cognition, and explored what the user’s attraction factors for online courses are. The key factors that affect consumers’ usage of online courses and the weights of impact relations are presented, aiming to provide guidance for future improvement of online courses. This study was conducted through the evaluation grid method of Miryoku engineering. In order to make the charm factors more accurate and representative, this study summarized the charm elements using the Kawakita Jiro (KJ) method, and then quantified the factors in the form of a questionnaire. Through the statistical analysis of the questionnaire and quantification theory type I, the correlation between the charm feeling and the online course as well as the weight of each item (original evaluation item) and category (specific evaluation item) were calculated. Through the research and discussion on the charm factors of online teaching, the results analyzed and integrated in this paper could give more substantive suggestions and help to the education industry. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Predicting Learning Outcomes with MOOC Clickstreams
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9020104 - 14 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have gradually become a dominant trend in education. Since 2014, the Ministry of Education in Taiwan has been promoting MOOC programs, with successful results. The ability of students to work at their own pace, however, is associated with [...] Read more.
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have gradually become a dominant trend in education. Since 2014, the Ministry of Education in Taiwan has been promoting MOOC programs, with successful results. The ability of students to work at their own pace, however, is associated with low MOOC completion rates and has recently become a focus. The development of a mechanism to effectively improve course completion rates continues to be of great interest to both teachers and researchers. This study established a series of learning behaviors using the video clickstream records of students, through a MOOC platform, to identify seven types of cognitive participation models of learners. We subsequently built practical machine learning models by using K-nearest neighbor (KNN), support vector machines (SVM), and artificial neural network (ANN) algorithms to predict students’ learning outcomes via their learning behaviors. The ANN machine learning method had the highest prediction accuracy. Based on the prediction results, we saw a correlation between video viewing behavior and learning outcomes. This could allow teachers to help students needing extra support successfully pass the course. To further improve our method, we classified the course videos based on their content. There were three video categories: theoretical, experimental, and analytic. Different prediction models were built for each of these three video types and their combinations. We performed the accuracy verification; our experimental results showed that we could use only theoretical and experimental video data, instead of all three types of data, to generate prediction models without significant differences in prediction accuracy. In addition to data reduction in model generation, this could help teachers evaluate the effectiveness of course videos. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
ARCS and RGT Integrated High-Efficiency E-Books
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9020094 - 29 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study used the attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction (ARCS) method and Kelly’s repertory grid technique (RGT) to develop a high-efficiency e-book. Its main design concepts were to use the ARCS model to create a highly interactive human–machine interface and multimedia learning content [...] Read more.
This study used the attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction (ARCS) method and Kelly’s repertory grid technique (RGT) to develop a high-efficiency e-book. Its main design concepts were to use the ARCS model to create a highly interactive human–machine interface and multimedia learning content that would enhance the learning motivation of users, and to use RGT and a knowledge map to supplement the learning strategy and help users effectively build personalized knowledge. This study adopted Taiwanese cherry blossoms as the learning objectives and recruited 70 freshmen from a university in Tainan as research participants. During the experiment, the students were divided into a control group, which used websites on cherry blossoms, and an experimental group, which used the system developed for this study. Learning outcome assessments and questionnaires were conducted on the pre- and post- learning test data of both groups. The learning outcomes were analyzed using a t-test. In the questionnaire, the assessments and discussions were focused on the four constructs of ARCS. The results show that the improvement of learning outcomes was more significant in the experimental group than in the control group. All dimensions of the questionnaire achieved significant results. Therefore, the learners provided positive reviews of the proposed high-efficiency e-book. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Difference between Learning Basic Form Generation and Automotive Exterior Design
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9020071 - 06 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study explores the correlation between learning about basic form factors and learning automotive exterior design (AED) for the first time. To help beginner AED students learn smoothly, we developed modular courses and proposed to teach basic form generation. Six modular assignments were [...] Read more.
This study explores the correlation between learning about basic form factors and learning automotive exterior design (AED) for the first time. To help beginner AED students learn smoothly, we developed modular courses and proposed to teach basic form generation. Six modular assignments were developed for the courses on Form Theory and Transportation Design, and 22 and 20 students, respectively, completed all the assignments of each course. All students were guided to become familiar with the five form factors: proportion, contour, volume, surface, and detail. According to the student self-assessments and responses for the Form Theory course, students gained a statistically equivalent learning experience of form factors from the four assignments; however, they gained significantly different levels of understanding and confidence. There was also a significant difference in understanding form factors during AED clay modeling. Further, students considered that the last two assignments in the Form Theory course had a significantly stronger relationship with learning AED than the first two assignments did. These findings are conducive to ensuring improvements in the modular courses to help future students begin learning AED. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Curriculum Design in Construction Engineering Departments for Colleges in Taiwan
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9010065 - 24 Mar 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has become a new trend in international education curriculum reform. This study analyzed the teaching of seven subjects and performance indicators by collecting data from literature of diversified fields, proficiency training courses, and syllabi of construction [...] Read more.
Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has become a new trend in international education curriculum reform. This study analyzed the teaching of seven subjects and performance indicators by collecting data from literature of diversified fields, proficiency training courses, and syllabi of construction management curricula provided by Taiwanese higher education institutions. Research incorporated both qualitative and quantitative methods. Qualitative approaches comprised a literature review and in-depth interview with experts; the quantitative approach was the fuzzy Delphi method, which was used to identify the syllabus constructs of major subjects and rate their performance indicators of secondary subjects. Interpretive structural modelling helped construct a systemic structure and relationships among different types of subjects to analyze curriculum frameworks and systematize teaching models. This study can be referenced to design syllabi for systemic courses in departments of construction engineering and management to educate future construction engineers at higher education institutions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Promoting Young Children’s Interest in Learning English in EFL Context: The Role of Mothers
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9010046 - 26 Feb 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a mother’s motivation for providing English education to a young child on the provision of English education and the child’s interest in learning English. Also, the mediating role of the type of [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a mother’s motivation for providing English education to a young child on the provision of English education and the child’s interest in learning English. Also, the mediating role of the type of English education provided (English interaction at home and English private lessons) between a mother’s motivation and a child’s interest in learning English was examined. In total, 414 Korean mothers of 3-to-5-year-olds reported their motivation for providing English education to their child, frequency of English interaction at home, and the duration of English private lessons the child experienced. The degree of a child’s interest in learning English was measured by both the child’s mother and the teacher. The main results are as follows. First, a mother’s integrative motivation had a positive effect on the provision of English education. On the other hand, a mother’s instrumental motivation did not have a significant effect on the provision of English education. Also, a mother’s integrative motivation had an indirect effect on a child’ interest in learning English through English interaction at home. A mother’s integrative motivation had a direct effect on a child’s interest in learning English as well. This study is theoretically meaningful in that the concept of integrative and instrumental motivation of foreign language learners is extended to the mothers who provide foreign language education to their young children. Also, this study provides practical implications for early childhood mothers by highlighting the importance of integrative motivation and English interaction at home to enhance the child’s interest in learning English. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
What Affects Middle School Students’ English Anxiety in the EFL Context? Evidence from South Korea
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9010039 - 14 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper examines what affects adolescents’ English anxiety in the English as Foreign Langauage (EFL) context. A total of 414 adolescents in South Korea participated in the study and the AMOS 20.0 was used in structural equation modeling for statistical analysis. The results [...] Read more.
This paper examines what affects adolescents’ English anxiety in the English as Foreign Langauage (EFL) context. A total of 414 adolescents in South Korea participated in the study and the AMOS 20.0 was used in structural equation modeling for statistical analysis. The results are as follows. Girls showed a higher level of English anxiety and self-directed learning ability than boys. Second, adolescents’ English self-efficacy had a partial mediating effect on the relationship between parental pressure expectation and English anxiety. Third, parental pressure expectation had a significant effect on English anxiety through self-directed learning and English self-efficacy. Fourth, a gender difference in the paths of the models was significant. This provides supporting evidence to many educators and parents for the implementation of effective support practices for adolescents who learn English in EFL contexts similar to Korea to reduce thier English anxiety. Full article
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