Special Issue "Virus Diagnostic Methods and Techniques: Learning from the COVID-19 Global Outbreak"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Chao-Min Cheng
Website
Guest Editor
National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-chu, Taiwan
Interests: diagnostic devices; medical devices; translational medicine
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sandeep K. Vashist
Website
Guest Editor
Global IVD Director, Pictor Diagnostics Pvt. Ltd., 24 Balfour Road Parnell, 5120 Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: immunoassays; IVD; POC technologies; bioanalytical sciences; nanotechnology; mobile healthcare
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Carmen de Mendoza
Website
Guest Editor
Pharmaceutical & Health Science Department. Universidad San Pablo-CEU, Madrid, Spain
Interests: Human retroviruses (HIV-1, HIV-2 & HTLV); viral hepatitis (HBV, HCV & HDV); resistance to antiretrovirals; molecular epidemiology for HTLV-1, HIV-2 subtypes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The spread of COVID-19 has become a global healthcare issue around the world. With recent technological advances in multiple research fields, such as materials science, micro-/nanotechnology, molecular biology, and bioengineering, much attention is shifting toward the development of new virus-based detection tools that not only address the needs for high sensitivity and specificity but also fulfil economic objectives in addition to the need for rapid point-of-care for groups and individuals with constrained resources and, possibly, limited training. These new detection technologies are also potentially applicable to different healthcare issues since they are disposable, inexpensive, portable, and easy to use—especially when their manufacture is based on low-cost materials. The topics in this Special Issue would cover point-of-care detection devices, microfluidic or paper-based detection devices, new materials for making detection devices, and others, with a particular focus on the precise diagnosis of COVID-19.

Dr. Chao-Min Cheng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Combining Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) to Combat the COVID-19 Pandemic
Diagnostics 2020, 10(4), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10040224 - 16 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The current standard testing method for screening coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is through reverse real-time PCR assay (rRT-PCR), a common molecular-based assay that requires an average of four to six hours to provide results [...] Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
In Vitro Diagnostic Assays for COVID-19: Recent Advances and Emerging Trends
Diagnostics 2020, 10(4), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10040202 - 05 Apr 2020
Cited by 9
Abstract
There have been tremendous advances in in vitro diagnostic (IVD) assays for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The main IVD assays used for COVID-19 employ real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that takes a [...] Read more.
There have been tremendous advances in in vitro diagnostic (IVD) assays for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The main IVD assays used for COVID-19 employ real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that takes a few hours. But the assay duration has been shortened to 45 min by Cepheid. Of interest is the point-of-care (POC) molecular assay by Abbott that decreased the assay duration to just 5 min. Most molecular tests have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under emergency use authorization (EUA) and are Conformité Européenne (CE) marked. A wide range of serology immunoassays (IAs) have also been developed that complement the molecular assays for the diagnosis of COVID-19. The most prominent IAs are automated chemiluminescent IA (CLIA), manual ELISA, and rapid lateral flow IA (LFIA), which detect the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) produced in persons in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The ongoing research efforts and advances in complementary technologies will pave the way to new POC IVD assays in the coming months. However, the performance of IVD assays needs to be critically evaluated before they are employed for the clinical diagnosis of COVID-19. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Point-of-Care RNA-Based Diagnostic Device for COVID-19
Diagnostics 2020, 10(3), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10030165 - 18 Mar 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
At the end of 2019, the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), a fast-spreading respiratory disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was reported in Wuhan, China and has now affected over 123 countries globally [...] Full article
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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Optimization of the CDC Protocol of Molecular Diagnosis of COVID-19 for Timely Diagnosis
Diagnostics 2020, 10(5), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10050333 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the current uncontrolled outbreak of infectious disease, has caused significant challenges throughout the world. A reliable rapid diagnostic test for COVID-19 is demanded worldwide. The real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain was one of the most quickly established methods in [...] Read more.
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the current uncontrolled outbreak of infectious disease, has caused significant challenges throughout the world. A reliable rapid diagnostic test for COVID-19 is demanded worldwide. The real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain was one of the most quickly established methods in the novel viral pandemic and was considered as the gold standard for the detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In this report, we illustrate our experience of applying a protocol from the Taiwan CDC and achieving assay optimization in the immediate circumstances to meet the urgent medical and public health needs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Antibody Tests in Detecting SARS-CoV-2 Infection: A Meta-Analysis
Diagnostics 2020, 10(5), 319; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10050319 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
The emergence of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 made imperative the need for diagnostic tests that can identify the infection. Although Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) is considered to be the gold standard, serological tests based on antibodies could be very helpful. [...] Read more.
The emergence of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 made imperative the need for diagnostic tests that can identify the infection. Although Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) is considered to be the gold standard, serological tests based on antibodies could be very helpful. However, individual studies are usually inconclusive, thus, a comparison of different tests is needed. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis in PubMed, medRxiv and bioRxiv. We used the bivariate method for meta-analysis of diagnostic tests pooling sensitivities and specificities. We evaluated IgM and IgG tests based on Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Chemiluminescence Enzyme Immunoassays (CLIA), Fluorescence Immunoassays (FIA), and the Lateral Flow Immunoassays (LFIA). We identified 38 studies containing data from 7848 individuals. Tests using the S antigen are more sensitive than N antigen-based tests. IgG tests perform better compared to IgM ones and show better sensitivity when the samples were taken longer after the onset of symptoms. Moreover, a combined IgG/IgM test seems to be a better choice in terms of sensitivity than measuring either antibody alone. All methods yield high specificity with some of them (ELISA and LFIA) reaching levels around 99%. ELISA- and CLIA-based methods perform better in terms of sensitivity (90%–94%) followed by LFIA and FIA with sensitivities ranging from 80% to 89%. ELISA tests could be a safer choice at this stage of the pandemic. LFIA tests are more attractive for large seroprevalence studies but show lower sensitivity, and this should be taken into account when designing and performing seroprevalence studies. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Saliva—Friend and Foe in the COVID-19 Outbreak
Diagnostics 2020, 10(5), 290; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10050290 - 09 May 2020
Abstract
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global ongoing pandemic. Timely, accurate and non-invasive SARS-CoV-2 detection in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, as well as determination of their immune status, [...] Read more.
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global ongoing pandemic. Timely, accurate and non-invasive SARS-CoV-2 detection in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, as well as determination of their immune status, will facilitate effective large-scale pandemic control measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Saliva is a biofluid whose anatomical source and location is of particularly strategic relevance to COVID-19 transmission and monitoring. This review focuses on the role of saliva as both a foe (a common mode of viral transmission via salivary droplets and potentially aerosols) and a friend (as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for viral detection and immune status surveillance) in combating COVID-19. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Editorial: TBD by Sandeep K. Vashist

Manuscript: TBD by Sandeep K. Vashist and his collaborators

Article: A Prophylaxis Mathematical Model from a Virtual Reality? Focus on Covid-19 Spreading by Dr. Luca Fiorillo

 

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