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Dent. J., Volume 7, Issue 4 (December 2019)

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Open AccessCase Report
Survival of a Maxillary Incisor in an Adolescent Male 16 Years after Its Delayed Replantation
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040101 - 16 Oct 2019
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Abstract
Introduction: Recreational and sport activities, traffic accidents and human behaviour represent the main causes of trauma in young people. Case presentation: This report describes a case of a 15.2-year-old male who suffered uncomplicated crown fracture and avulsion of tooth 11 and uncomplicated crown [...] Read more.
Introduction: Recreational and sport activities, traffic accidents and human behaviour represent the main causes of trauma in young people. Case presentation: This report describes a case of a 15.2-year-old male who suffered uncomplicated crown fracture and avulsion of tooth 11 and uncomplicated crown fracture of tooth 21 due to a bicycle accident. Tooth 11 was dry stored and it was replanted 18 h after the trauma. The root was planed to remove the necrotic periodontal tissue, the pulp was extirpated before replantation and a flexible splint was applied to tooth 13 to tooth 23 for 3 weeks. A replacement root resorption of replanted tooth was suspected at the 3-month radiographic control and suffered a dramatic increase later; minimal infraocclusion, about 1 mm, was observed due to its ankylosis. Sixteen years after the trauma the patient was scheduled for an orthodontic and implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. Conclusion: Delayed replantation usually has a long-term poor prognosis, so it is very important to promote awareness regarding emergency management modalities in dental traumatology especially among parents, school teachers, and coaches that are usually present at the site of the accident. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Restorative Dentistry and Traumatology)
Open AccessArticle
Q-Switch Nd:YAG Laser-Assisted Decontamination of Implant Surface
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040099 - 01 Oct 2019
Viewed by 333
Abstract
Peri-implantitis (PI) is an inflammatory disease of peri-implant tissues, it represents the most frequent complication of dental implants. Evidence revealed that microorganisms play the chief role in causing PI. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the cleaning of contaminated dental implant [...] Read more.
Peri-implantitis (PI) is an inflammatory disease of peri-implant tissues, it represents the most frequent complication of dental implants. Evidence revealed that microorganisms play the chief role in causing PI. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the cleaning of contaminated dental implant surfaces by means of the Q-switch Nd:YAG (Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) laser and an increase in temperature at lased implant surfaces during the cleaning process. Seventy-eight implants (titanium grade 4) were used (Euroteknika, Sallanches, France). Thirty-six sterile implants and forty-two contaminated implants were collected from failed clinical implants for different reasons, independent from the study. Thirty-six contaminated implants were partially irradiated by Q-switch Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm). Six other contaminated implants were used for temperature rise evaluation. All laser irradiations were calibrated by means of a powermetter in order to evaluate the effective delivered energy. The irradiation conditions delivered per pulse on the target were effectively: energy density per pulse of 0.597 J/cm2, pick powers density of 56 mW/cm2, 270 mW per pulse with a spot diameter of 2.4 mm, and with repetition rate of 10 Hz for pulse duration of 6 ns. Irradiation was performed during a total time of 2 s in a non-contact mode at a distance of 0.5 mm from implant surfaces. The parameters were chosen according to the results of a theoretical modeling calculation of the Nd:YAG laser fluency on implant surface. Evaluation of contaminants removal showed that the cleaning of the irradiated implant surfaces was statistically similar to those of sterile implants (p-value ≤ 0.05). SEM analysis confirmed that our parameters did not alter the lased surfaces. The increase in temperature generated at lased implant surfaces during cleaning was below 1 °C. According to our findings, Q-switch Nd:YAG laser with short pulse duration in nanoseconds is able to significantly clean contaminated implant surfaces. Irradiation parameters used in our study can be considered safe for periodontal tissue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser in Implantology)
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Open AccessArticle
The Psychological Impact of Dental Aesthetics in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Compared with Healthy Peers: A Cross-Sectional Study
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040098 - 01 Oct 2019
Viewed by 187
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether dental aesthetics had a different impact on the psychosocial domains of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) as compared with healthy peers. Fifty JIA patients and eighty controls aged between 13 and 17 years were enrolled. The [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess whether dental aesthetics had a different impact on the psychosocial domains of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) as compared with healthy peers. Fifty JIA patients and eighty controls aged between 13 and 17 years were enrolled. The Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) was administered along with tools for the self-assessment of malocclusion and self-esteem. An objective evaluation of malocclusion severity was performed through a clinical evaluation with the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). The sample was divided according to the DAI stages of malocclusion severity; a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to assess whether there was a difference in the studied variables according to the malocclusion and the presence of JIA. The results showed no interaction between the malocclusion severity and the presence of JIA in all analyzed variables (all p > 0.05). According to the DAI stages, the Dental Self-Confidence domain of the PIDAQ and the Perception of Occlusion Scale showed statistically significant differences only within the controls (p = 0.027 and p = 0.014, respectively). Therefore, JIA adolescents seem to be less concerned about their dental aesthetics compared with healthy peers, and clinicians should take particular care when proposing orthodontic treatments aiming only to improve dental aesthetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Conditions in Childhood, Volume Ⅱ)
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Open AccessArticle
Educational Attainment and Self-Rated Oral Health among American Older Adults: Hispanics’ Diminished Returns
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040097 - 01 Oct 2019
Viewed by 198
Abstract
Background: Minorities’ diminished returns (MDRs) refer to systemically weaker effects of socioeconomic status (SES), particularly educational attainment, on the health of non-Whites compared to Whites. Aim: Using a nationally representative sample, we aimed to investigate ethnic differences in the effect of [...] Read more.
Background: Minorities’ diminished returns (MDRs) refer to systemically weaker effects of socioeconomic status (SES), particularly educational attainment, on the health of non-Whites compared to Whites. Aim: Using a nationally representative sample, we aimed to investigate ethnic differences in the effect of SES (educational attainment) on the self-rated oral health of Hispanic older adults in the US. Methods: This study analyzed the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging (UM-NPHA) 2017 data, which included 2131 older adults who were 50 to 80 years old (202 Hispanics and 1929 non-Hispanics). Ethnicity, race, educational attainment (SES), age, gender, employment, retirement, and self-rated oral health (single item) were measured. Logistic regressions were applied for data analysis. Results: High educational attainment was associated with lower odds of poor oral health in the pooled sample, net of all covariates. The effect of educational attainment on poor self-rated oral health was found to be weaker for Hispanics than for non-Hispanics. Conclusion: We observed MDRs of educational attainment (SES) on oral health for Hispanic older adults. In other words, compared to non-Hispanics, Hispanics gain less oral health from their educational attainment (SES). Full article
Open AccessArticle
Self-Reported Changes in Oral Hygiene Habits among Adolescents Receiving Orthodontic Treatment
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040096 - 01 Oct 2019
Viewed by 299
Abstract
The prevalence of malocclusion and a need for orthodontic treatment is high. Orthodontic appliances increase biofilm accumulation by expanding plaque retention sites. The aim of this study was to investigate the self-reported changes in oral hygiene habits among adolescents receiving orthodontic treatment. A [...] Read more.
The prevalence of malocclusion and a need for orthodontic treatment is high. Orthodontic appliances increase biofilm accumulation by expanding plaque retention sites. The aim of this study was to investigate the self-reported changes in oral hygiene habits among adolescents receiving orthodontic treatment. A cross-sectional study of 291 patients aged 10–17 years (mean (M) = 12.98; standard deviation (SD) = 2.36) was conducted in the Department of Orthodontics, Lithuanian University of Medical Sciences (LSMU) Hospital (Kaunas, Lithuania) during the fall semester (October–January) of the 2017/2018 study year. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire covered background information, experience of orthodontic treatment, oral hygiene habits and the seeking of professional dental care. Statistical data analysis was performed using SPSS version 22. To establish relationships between categorical variables, Chi-squared tests (χ2) were used. A p-value ≤ 0.05 was set to indicate statistically significant difference. The univariate logistic regression analysis evaluated the probability of an event given a certain risk indicator, including odds ratio (OR) and its confidence interval (95% CI). Associations were found between the usage of auxiliary measures (OR = 1.797 (1.118–2.887), p = 0.015), tongue cleaning (OR = 1.712 (1.059–2.767), p = 0.028), mouth rinsing after meals (OR = 1.707 (1.048–2.781), p = 0.032) and experience of orthodontic treatment, respectively. More orthodontic patients underwent professional oral hygiene regularly than non-orthodontic patients (p = 0.024). More patients with fixed orthodontic appliances reported significantly changed oral hygiene habits, while more orthodontic patients with removable appliances did not change their oral hygiene habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Biofilms in Orthodontics)
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Open AccessCase Report
Integrated Digital and Conventional Treatment Workflow in Guided Complete Mouth Implant Rehabilitation: A Clinical Case Report
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040100 - 01 Oct 2019
Viewed by 281
Abstract
The introduction of digital dentistry and CAD/CAM technology has redefined treatment concepts in implant dentistry—computer guided implant placement has become routine practice, and CAD/CAM prostheses are now commonplace. These advances in treatment options and modalities has led to a paradigm shift in the [...] Read more.
The introduction of digital dentistry and CAD/CAM technology has redefined treatment concepts in implant dentistry—computer guided implant placement has become routine practice, and CAD/CAM prostheses are now commonplace. These advances in treatment options and modalities has led to a paradigm shift in the workflow of surgical and restorative treatments. This case report presents a customized staged treatment protocol that involves the strategic retention of teeth to serve as transitional abutments, which will support a computer guided implant surgical guide as well as a fixed interim prosthesis. The treatment protocol also describes an integrated digital and conventional workflow for full mouth implant-supported fixed prosthetic rehabilitations to provide improved patient care with more predictable outcomes and fewer complications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Association between Early Childhood Caries and Quality of Life: Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale and Pufa Index
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040095 - 25 Sep 2019
Viewed by 384
Abstract
Early Childhood Caries (ECC) are one of the major oral diseases affecting children. ECC adversely affects the children’s as well as their parent/caregivers quality of life. The present study aims to assess the quality of life in children with Early Childhood Caries aged [...] Read more.
Early Childhood Caries (ECC) are one of the major oral diseases affecting children. ECC adversely affects the children’s as well as their parent/caregivers quality of life. The present study aims to assess the quality of life in children with Early Childhood Caries aged 6–72 months using the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale. It also aims to compare the quality of life between children with pufa scores of > 0 and a pufa score = 0. A total of 238 children aged 6 months to 72 months with ECC and their parent/caregiver were included in the present study. Oral examinations of the children were performed by the principal examiner using the defs and pufa index, which was followed by a personal interview of the 13 items in the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact scale among the 238 parents/caregivers. The results showed that, overall, Early Childhood Caries have a negative impact on children’s quality of life, as assessed by the parent/caregiver. The overall Early Childhood Oral Health Impact scale score ranged from 0–32 (mean ± SD, 14.12 ± 6.72). Children with a pufa score > 0 (mean ± SD, 16.14 ± 6.27, p < 0.001) have significantly lower quality of life than children with pufa score = 0 (mean ± SD, 9.07 ± 4.94, p < 0.001). Early Childhood Caries had a negative impact on the quality of life of children aged 6–72 months. Children with a pufa score of “0” had better oral health-related quality of life than children with a pufa score > 0. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Conditions in Childhood, Volume Ⅱ)
Open AccessArticle
Flowable Bulk-Fill Materials Compared to Nano Ceramic Composites for Class I Cavities Restorations in Primary Molars: A Two-Year Prospective Case-Control Study
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040094 - 25 Sep 2019
Viewed by 283
Abstract
Background: The aim of this split-mouth study is to compare the results of 24 months’ clinical performance of primary molar Class I restorations with a nano-ceramic composite, Ceram•X mono (Dentsply) with a flowable bulk-fill material regular viscosity, SDR (Dentsply). Methods: Following the ethical [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this split-mouth study is to compare the results of 24 months’ clinical performance of primary molar Class I restorations with a nano-ceramic composite, Ceram•X mono (Dentsply) with a flowable bulk-fill material regular viscosity, SDR (Dentsply). Methods: Following the ethical approval, 27 patients with at least two class I cavities in primary molars were included in the study. A total number of 54 restorations were conducted (n = 27 for Ceram X and n = 27 for SDR). Restorations were evaluated at baseline, 6, 18, and 24 months, according to the modified Ryge criteria. The cavosurface marginal discoloration and color match were evaluated visually after air-drying the tooth and after removing the plaque (if necessary). Results: At 24 months’ follow-up, 54 restorations showed similar clinical performance. The statistical analysis did not reveal any statistical significance in the values between the groups in 7 out of 7 modified Ryge criteria. However, two restorations in both groups received Bravo ratings in the cavosurface marginal discoloration scoring. No side effects were reported by the participants of the study. Conclusion: Restorations with both materials (Ceram•X mono and SDR) have provided almost identical results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Restorative Dentistry and Traumatology)
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