Oral Hygiene and Biofilms in Orthodontics

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Dental Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2021) | Viewed by 21900

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: oral medicine; dental materials; operative dentistry; oral health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Discipline of Orthodontics, Department of Oral Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Interests: biofilm; orthodontics; caries; oral microbiome; enamel demineralization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue invites submissions with a focus on orthodontics and advances in oral hygiene and biofilms.

Orthodontic fixed appliances interfere with tooth brushing and facilitate accumulation of dental biofilm (plaque). Failure to maintain good oral hygiene during orthodontic treatment can result in adverse effects such as enamel demineralization, gingivitis, and halitosis. Biofilm control in patients wearing orthodontic fixed appliances is therefore of paramount importance. Moreover, the type and the surface proprieties of orthodontic materials can play a significant role in bacterial adhesion and dental biofilm accumulation.

In order to capture the diverse knowledge and experience in this field, we encourage submissions across a range of dental research disciplines. We seek a mix of quality manuscripts: these may include original dental research and review manuscripts on key topics of interest.

Prof. Dr. Gianrico Spagnuolo
Prof. Peter Mei
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • orthodontics
  • biofilm
  • oral hygiene
  • enamel demineralization
  • enamel remineralization
  • oral microbiome
  • dental plaque
  • orthodontic materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 3255 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets after Enamel Conditioning with Acid Etching and Hydroabrasion
by Michele Tepedino, Maciej Iancu Potrubacz, Lorenzo Arrizza, Manuela Russo, Francesco Cavarra, Massimo Cordaro and Claudio Chimenti
Dent. J. 2020, 8(4), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8040108 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2977
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index ARI) of orthodontic brackets following enamel conditioning with acid etching, hydroabrasion, and with both procedures. Thirty extracted human premolars were divided into three groups and received either [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index ARI) of orthodontic brackets following enamel conditioning with acid etching, hydroabrasion, and with both procedures. Thirty extracted human premolars were divided into three groups and received either acid etching, hydroabrasion or both procedures. Orthodontic brackets were bonded with composite resin. Shear bond strength was tested with a tensile machine, then the teeth were observed under a stereomicroscope to evaluate ARI scores. The enamel morphology after each conditioning method was evaluated with scanning electron microscope imaging. A one-way ANOVA and a Kruskal−Wallis H test were used to compare the bond strength and the ARI scores among the three groups. Hydroabrasion alone produced shear bond strength values below clinical acceptability, while the combination of acid etching and hydroabrasion produced the highest values. The ARI scores in the hydroabrasion group were significantly different from the other groups. Hydroabrasion followed by acid etching was effective in increasing the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Further in vivo studies are needed to confirm the cost and benefits of this technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Biofilms in Orthodontics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 461 KiB  
Article
Impact of Fixed Orthodontic Appliance and Clear Aligners on the Periodontal Health: A Prospective Clinical Study
by Ada Carolina Pango Madariaga, Rosaria Bucci, Roberto Rongo, Vittorio Simeon, Vincenzo D’Antò and Rosa Valletta
Dent. J. 2020, 8(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8010004 - 2 Jan 2020
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 7002
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the periodontal health of orthodontic patients with supportive periodontal therapy in a 3 month follow-up. The sample comprised 20 patients (mean age 20.6 ± 8.1 years) in treatment with multibracket fixed appliances (fixed group—FG) and 20 patients (mean [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the periodontal health of orthodontic patients with supportive periodontal therapy in a 3 month follow-up. The sample comprised 20 patients (mean age 20.6 ± 8.1 years) in treatment with multibracket fixed appliances (fixed group—FG) and 20 patients (mean age 34.7 ± 12.5 years) in treatment with clear aligners (clear aligners group—CAG). At baseline (T0) and after 3 months (T1), probing depth (PD), plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), and gingival recession (REC) were measured. Patients were trained to perform an individualized tooth brushing technique, and every 2 weeks they were re-called to reinforce the oral hygiene instructions. The intra-group comparisons (T1 vs. T0) were calculated with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, while a linear regression model was used for the inter-group comparisons (FG vs. CAG). The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Statistically significant decrease in both groups was found for PD (FG: Δ, −9.2 inter-quartile range (IQR), −22.5, −5.5; CAG: Δ, −12.6 IQR, −25.4, −4.8), BOP (FG: Δ, −53.5 IQR, −70.5, −37; CAG: Δ, −37.5 IQR, −54.5, −23), and PI (FG: Δ, −17.5 IQR, −62.5, 14.5; CAG: Δ, −24 IQR, −49.5, −5). The result of the linear regression models suggested that the type of appliance did not have any effects on the improvement of periodontal variables. Therefore, patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and clear aligners did not show differences in gingival health when followed by a dental hygienist. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Biofilms in Orthodontics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 317 KiB  
Article
Self-Reported Changes in Oral Hygiene Habits among Adolescents Receiving Orthodontic Treatment
by Sandra Petrauskiene, Natalia Wanczewska, Egle Slabsinskiene and Gintare Zemgulyte
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040096 - 1 Oct 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4398
Abstract
The prevalence of malocclusion and a need for orthodontic treatment is high. Orthodontic appliances increase biofilm accumulation by expanding plaque retention sites. The aim of this study was to investigate the self-reported changes in oral hygiene habits among adolescents receiving orthodontic treatment. A [...] Read more.
The prevalence of malocclusion and a need for orthodontic treatment is high. Orthodontic appliances increase biofilm accumulation by expanding plaque retention sites. The aim of this study was to investigate the self-reported changes in oral hygiene habits among adolescents receiving orthodontic treatment. A cross-sectional study of 291 patients aged 10–17 years (mean (M) = 12.98; standard deviation (SD) = 2.36) was conducted in the Department of Orthodontics, Lithuanian University of Medical Sciences (LSMU) Hospital (Kaunas, Lithuania) during the fall semester (October–January) of the 2017/2018 study year. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire covered background information, experience of orthodontic treatment, oral hygiene habits and the seeking of professional dental care. Statistical data analysis was performed using SPSS version 22. To establish relationships between categorical variables, Chi-squared tests (χ2) were used. A p-value ≤ 0.05 was set to indicate statistically significant difference. The univariate logistic regression analysis evaluated the probability of an event given a certain risk indicator, including odds ratio (OR) and its confidence interval (95% CI). Associations were found between the usage of auxiliary measures (OR = 1.797 (1.118–2.887), p = 0.015), tongue cleaning (OR = 1.712 (1.059–2.767), p = 0.028), mouth rinsing after meals (OR = 1.707 (1.048–2.781), p = 0.032) and experience of orthodontic treatment, respectively. More orthodontic patients underwent professional oral hygiene regularly than non-orthodontic patients (p = 0.024). More patients with fixed orthodontic appliances reported significantly changed oral hygiene habits, while more orthodontic patients with removable appliances did not change their oral hygiene habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Biofilms in Orthodontics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 4197 KiB  
Article
Polyphenols Inhibit Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation
by Yosi Farkash, Mark Feldman, Isaac Ginsburg, Doron Steinberg and Miriam Shalish
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020042 - 11 Apr 2019
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 6141
Abstract
Background: Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Candida albicans (C. albicans) are two major contributors to dental caries. They have a symbiotic relationship, allowing them to create an enhanced biofilm. Our goal was to examine whether two natural polyphenols (Padma [...] Read more.
Background: Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Candida albicans (C. albicans) are two major contributors to dental caries. They have a symbiotic relationship, allowing them to create an enhanced biofilm. Our goal was to examine whether two natural polyphenols (Padma hepaten (PH) and a polyphenol extraction from green tea (PPFGT)) could inhibit the caries-inducing properties of S. mutans and C. albicans. Methods: Co-species biofilms of S. mutans and C. albicans were grown in the presence of PH and PPFGT. Biofilm formation was tested spectrophotometrically. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) secretion was quantified using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Biofilm development was also tested on orthodontic surfaces (Essix) to assess biofilm inhibition ability on such an orthodontic appliance. Results: PPFGT and PH dose-dependently inhibited biofilm formation without affecting the planktonic growth. We found a significant reduction in biofilm total biomass using 0.625 mg/mL PPFGT and 0.16 mg/mL PH. A concentration of 0.31 mg/mL PPFGT and 0.16 mg/mL PH inhibited the total cell growth by 54% and EPS secretion by 81%. A reduction in biofilm formation and EPS secretion was also observed on orthodontic PVC surfaces. Conclusions: The polyphenolic extractions PPFGT and PH have an inhibitory effect on S. mutans and C. albicans biofilm formation and EPS secretion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Hygiene and Biofilms in Orthodontics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop