Special Issue "Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Conditions in Childhood, Volume Ⅱ"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Helen Rodd Website E-Mail
School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Claremont Crescent, Sheffield, S10 2TA, UK
Interests: paediatric dentistry, psychosocial impacts of dental conditions, management of enamel defects, dental anxiety, cognitive behavioural therapy
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Zoe Marshman Website E-Mail
School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Claremont Crescent, Sheffield, S10 2TA, UK
Interests: dental public health, child-centred oral health research, dental anxiety, cognitive behavioural therapy, clinical trials for caries prevention and management

Special Issue Information

Guest Editors' Research Interests:

We belong to a multidisciplinary research team that aims to improve the oral health and treatment experiences of children and young people through a combination of clinical and social scientific research strategies that:

  • Give children an active voice in relation to their oral health.
  • Explore and evaluate the impact of oral health on the daily lives of children and their families.
  • Develop child-centred measures, decision aids and resources.

Some of our current research projects include: development and evaluation of a self-help cognitive behavioural therapy resource for young people with dental anxiety; determining the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a SMS (text message) behaviour change programme to improve the oral health of young people living in deprived areas; conduct of a multi-centred clinical trial, ‘Filling Children's Teeth: Indicated Or Not?’ which seeks to provide an evidence base for the most effective approach to the management of dental caries in the primary teeth of children; and exploring the impacts of traumatic dental injuries and enamel defects on children’s oral health-related quality of life.

Dear Colleagues,

The wider contribution of children’s oral health to their overall wellbeing is increasingly being acknowledged. Clinicians, public health practitioners and researchers are therefore increasingly interested in the psychosocial impacts of various dental conditions and how interventions may affect a child’s oral health-related quality of life. Children are eloquent and insightful in describing the social, emotional or functional impacts of their dental condition and treatment experiences, providing they are engaged in a suitably child-centred approach. Indeed, over the last decade or so, it has been encouraging to observe the emergence of novel ways of involving children in oral health research, to ensure that their opinions are listened to and valued. Consequently, we now have a much greater understanding of what it means to a child (and indeed their family) to have a dental condition such as caries, enamel defects or trauma.

We very much hope that readers will enjoy this second volume of our Special Issue, which highlights recent research with children who have a range of dental conditions, and raises awareness of the diversity of impacts. The included studies will also serve to demonstrate the value of multi-disciplinary teams in enhancing both qualitative and quantitative enquiry. The overall theme reflects our own personal interest in child-centred dental research, through which we hope to improve the oral health and treatment experiences of children and their families (https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/dentalschool/research/create/home2). For those of us who have the privilege of providing dental care for children, it is essential that we appreciate their perspectives and expectations, so that treatment outcomes are considered not just from a biomedical approach, but also from a psychosocial perspective.

Thank you very much!

Prof. Dr. Helen Rodd
Prof. Dr. Zoe Marshman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatric dentistry
  • psychosocial impacts
  • oral health-related quality of life
  • dental conditions
  • caries
  • enamel defects
  • traumatic dental injury
  • child

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
‘Message to Dentist’: Facilitating Communication with Dentally Anxious Children
Dent. J. 2019, 7(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7030069 - 01 Jul 2019
Abstract
Dental anxiety affects children worldwide and can have negative consequences on oral health. This study aimed to evaluate a novel communication aid ‘message to dentist’ (MTD), as part of a wider cognitive behavioural therapy approach to reduce dental anxiety in young patients. Dentally [...] Read more.
Dental anxiety affects children worldwide and can have negative consequences on oral health. This study aimed to evaluate a novel communication aid ‘message to dentist’ (MTD), as part of a wider cognitive behavioural therapy approach to reduce dental anxiety in young patients. Dentally anxious children, aged 9–16 years, were invited to complete the MTD proforma, before and following their course of treatment. They scored how worried they were and their anticipated pain levels on a scale of 1–10 (10 being the worst outcome). They also wrote down their coping plans and post-treatment reflections. One hundred and five children, from a UK general dental practice and a hospital clinic, were included. They had a mean age of 11.6 years, and 65% were female. There was a significant reduction in self-report worry (from 4.9 to 2.1) and anticipated pain (from 5.1 to 2.0) scores (p < 0.05, paired t-test). Many children (30%) used listening to music/audiobook as a coping strategy. Thematic analysis revealed concerns around pain, uncertainty, errors and specific procedures. The MTD proforma proved an effective means of facilitating communication between anxious children and the dental team, allowing them to identify their worries and make personalised coping plans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Conditions in Childhood, Volume Ⅱ)
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Open AccessArticle
Factors Associated with Dental Fear and Anxiety in Children Aged 7 to 9 Years
Dent. J. 2019, 7(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7030068 - 01 Jul 2019
Abstract
The aim was to investigate changes in dental fear and anxiety (DFA) and verify factors associated with DFA in children. A longitudinal cohort study that included 160 children aged 7 years was carried out. A questionnaire was completed by parents at two time [...] Read more.
The aim was to investigate changes in dental fear and anxiety (DFA) and verify factors associated with DFA in children. A longitudinal cohort study that included 160 children aged 7 years was carried out. A questionnaire was completed by parents at two time points and evaluated the immigrant background, maternal education, whether the child had ever had toothache, and whether the parents had dental fear. The oral clinical examination evaluated decayed, extracted, and filled primary teeth (deft). The children’s fear survey schedule dental subscale (CFSS-DS) was used to assess the dental fear of the children. Multilevel mixed-effects logistic regressions analyses were used. The CFSS-DS found that 7% of the children had dental fear at age 7 and mean CFSS-DS was 22.9. At 9 years of age, 8% reported dental fear and the mean increased to 25.4. Parental dental fear, experience of toothache, and report of painful dental treatment and caries development between 7 and 9 years of age were factors that were significantly related to development of DFA. There was a change in DFA between 7 and 9 years of age. Dental fear and anxiety is a dynamic process in growing individuals and is significantly related to painful symptoms and experiences of dental care as well as parental dental fear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Conditions in Childhood, Volume Ⅱ)
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Open AccessArticle
The Relationship between Caries-Specific Quality of Life and Generic Wellbeing in a Dutch Pediatric Population
Dent. J. 2019, 7(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7030067 - 01 Jul 2019
Abstract
Dental caries has significant negative impacts on the lives of children and young people. Whilst the impacts on children’s oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) have been increasingly investigated, the effect on children’s overall wellbeing remains largely unknown. Data were obtained from a [...] Read more.
Dental caries has significant negative impacts on the lives of children and young people. Whilst the impacts on children’s oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) have been increasingly investigated, the effect on children’s overall wellbeing remains largely unknown. Data were obtained from a survey conducted across four cities in the Netherlands. Children and their parents completed a series of questionnaires, which included Dutch versions of a caries-specific pediatric measure of OHRQoL (CARIES-QC-NL) and a generic pediatric health utility measure (CHU9D-NL). The participating children underwent dental examinations to determine their caries status. A total of 486 11-year-old children participated in the study, of which 184 had caries experience (38%). The mean number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) was 0.71. The CARIES-QC-NL was found to have statistically significant correlations with the DMFT and CHU9D-NL. There were no statistically significant correlations between the CHU9D and the clinical variables. The CARIES-QC-NL had acceptable internal consistency and construct validity in this population despite the low prevalence of active caries. A relationship was demonstrated between OHRQoL and generic wellbeing in this population. Despite this, the CHU9D did not show any correlation with the clinical data, which may limit its application in studies of the impact of dental caries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Conditions in Childhood, Volume Ⅱ)
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