Special Issue "Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Special Needs Patients and Systemic Implications of Oral Health"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luca Fiorillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences, Morphological and Functional Images, School of Dentistry University of Messina, 98100 Messina, Italy
2. Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Specialties, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 80121 Naples, Italy
Interests: oral health; public health; systemic disease; biomaterials; microbiomes; infection risk; oral surgery; rehabilitative medicine; environment disinfection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Luigi Laino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy
Interests: biomaterials; oral surgery; implantology; oral pathology; dental materials
Prof. Dr. Gabriele Cervino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tolga Tozum
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Periodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
Interests: periodontics; oral surgery; dentistry; oral rehabilitation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery are performed daily on patients of all ages. Often, these patients undergo complex, polypharmacy pharmacological therapy, and in some situations, their systemic conditions tend to increase their surgical risk. In fact, surgery must always take into account patients’ accurate medical history and, precisely on this basis, plan each patient’s surgery or prophylaxis, evaluating the risk and post-surgical quality of life. The purpose of this Special Issue is to create a collection on local and systemic contraindications to surgery in the oro-maxillofacial district, focusing on physiological contraindications (for example pregnancy), pharmacological contraindications, and iatrogenic, systemic, genetic, and other pathologies. Moreover, this Special Issue would like to bring to light all the post-operative implications this type of surgery can have at the systemic level and illustrate cases in which oral health affects patients’ quality of life.

Dr. Luca Fiorillo
Prof Luigi Laino
Dr. Gabriele Cervino
Prof. Marco Cicciù
Prof. Tolga Tozum
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oral surgery
  • Maxillofacial surgery
  • Special-needs patients
  • Oral Health and systemic disease
  • Oral Health and systemic implications
  • Surgeries adverse effect
  • polipharmacological therapy
  • Surgeries Prophylaxis
  • Pharmacological adverse effect
  • Syndromic patients
  • OHRQoL
  • Quality of Life

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Milestones of Dentistry: Advent of Anesthetics in Oral Surgery
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040112 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1043
Abstract
The history of dentistry, of course, has followed a constant development since the dawn of society. The dental profession, reserved in ancient times to people with special skills and high rank, after the Middle Ages was diminished and practiced by barbers. The pharmacological [...] Read more.
The history of dentistry, of course, has followed a constant development since the dawn of society. The dental profession, reserved in ancient times to people with special skills and high rank, after the Middle Ages was diminished and practiced by barbers. The pharmacological evolution of oral surgery techniques has led this branch, today as never before, to obtain a level of specialization and preparation comparable to all other specialist medical branches. Some milestones in the history of dentistry will be considered so as to finally understand how the importance of anesthetic drugs was of primary importance, and which drugs are used today. Full article

Research

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Article
Effect of Flavonoid Supplementation on Alveolar Bone Healing—A Randomized Pilot Trial
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030086 - 04 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1171
Abstract
We investigated the effects of two common dietary supplements on bone healing in dental extraction sockets in humans. In this randomized pilot trial, male subjects took Grape Seed Extract [GSE] or Grapefruit Extract [GFE] starting two weeks prior to dental extraction and maintained [...] Read more.
We investigated the effects of two common dietary supplements on bone healing in dental extraction sockets in humans. In this randomized pilot trial, male subjects took Grape Seed Extract [GSE] or Grapefruit Extract [GFE] starting two weeks prior to dental extraction and maintained this regimen for sixty days after surgery. Extraction sockets were filled with a collagen plug. After 24 h, a socket sample was collected and processed for quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and an 84-gene wound healing assay. Sixty days after tooth extraction, a core of newly formed bone was obtained prior to dental implant placement and processed for histology. qRT-PCR revealed that GFE led to a significant decrease in platelet-derived growth factor and interleukin (IL)1-β compared to GSE, and a significant decrease in IL-6 and CXCL2 compared to control. GSE led to a significant increase in coagulation factor Von Willebrand and inflammatory marker IL1-β compared to GFE. WISP1 and CXCL5 were upregulated in both groups. Overall, GFE showed a downregulation of inflammation and GSE led to a decrease in collagen density and increased osteoclasts. This pilot trial highlights the need for further investigation on the mechanism of action of such supplements on bone healing and oral health. Full article
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Article
Evaluation of Profile Changes in Class II Individuals Treated by Means of Herbst Miniscope Appliance
Dent. J. 2020, 8(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8010027 - 20 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1145
Abstract
Background: To evaluate the profile changes following orthopedic/orthodontic treatment with the Herbst Miniscope® appliance in subjects affected with Class II malocclusion with mandibular retrusion. Methods: A total of 44 patients presenting a skeletal Angle Class II malocclusion (ANB > 4°) due to [...] Read more.
Background: To evaluate the profile changes following orthopedic/orthodontic treatment with the Herbst Miniscope® appliance in subjects affected with Class II malocclusion with mandibular retrusion. Methods: A total of 44 patients presenting a skeletal Angle Class II malocclusion (ANB > 4°) due to mandibular retrusion and a cervical maturation stage between CS2 and CS3 were included in the study. Of these 44 patients, 22 (mean age 11.9 ± 1.3, HBT group) were treated using the Herbst appliance, while 22 (mean age 10.6 ± 1.3, CTR group) were followed for a 12-month observational period. A cephalometric tracing was performed at the beginning of treatment (T0) and after 12 months (T1). Results: In both groups there was a significant advancement of soft tissue pogonion (HBT = 3.5 ± 3.0 mm, p < 0.001; CTR = 2.2 ± 2.9 mm, p < 0.001), but the difference between the two groups was not significant (p = 0.172). On the contrary, both groups had a significant advancement of the mandibular sulcus (HBT = 3.7 ± 2.8 mm, p < 0.001; CTR = 1.2 ± 2.2 mm, p < 0.001) and a lower lip protrusion (HBT = 3.45 ± 2.51 mm, p < 0.001; CTR = 1.7 ± 2.7 mm, p = 0.008), but in both cases the HBT group showed a statistically significant greater increase in sulcus protrusion (p = 0.002) and lower lip protrusion (p = 0.029) than controls. There were no statistically significant effects on the upper jaw. Conclusions: The Herbst appliance advanced the lower jaw soft tissues. Full article
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Article
Nonsyndromic Oral Cleft in First-Degree Relatives of Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
Dent. J. 2020, 8(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8010023 - 04 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 889
Abstract
Multiple studies have demonstrated an association between cancer and nonsyndromic oral clefts in different populations. In this study, we assessed the occurrence of nonsyndromic oral clefts in families of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 50) and controls (n = [...] Read more.
Multiple studies have demonstrated an association between cancer and nonsyndromic oral clefts in different populations. In this study, we assessed the occurrence of nonsyndromic oral clefts in families of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 50) and controls (n = 125). The parents of the patients answered a questionnaire with basic demographic information and family history of nonsyndromic oral clefts in first-degree relatives. Statistical analysis was carried out using Fisher’s exact test. In the ALL group, 22 (44%) were male and 28 (56%) were female, and the average age was 13.2 ± 12.2 years. In the control group, 64 (51.2%) were male and 65 were female and the average age was 11.3 ± 10.3 years. Two out of 50 patients (4%) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had a positive history of nonsyndromic oral clefts, whereas there were no reported occurrences of nonsyndromic oral clefts in the control group (OR: 12.94, 95% CI: 0.61–274.6, p = 0.08). Despite the limited population, the frequency of nonsyndromic oral clefts was increased in the first-degree relatives of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Studies with larger samples and molecular analyses are needed to better understand the possible etiological relationship between cancer and nonsyndromic oral clefts. Full article

Review

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Review
Porphyromonas gingivalis, Periodontal and Systemic Implications: A Systematic Review
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040114 - 11 Dec 2019
Cited by 44 | Viewed by 2972
Abstract
In recent scientific literature, oral infections and systemic manifestations, or correlations between oral health and systemic diseases are a topic of discussion. Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the bacteria implicated in the biofilm formation of bacterial plaque, and plays an important role in [...] Read more.
In recent scientific literature, oral infections and systemic manifestations, or correlations between oral health and systemic diseases are a topic of discussion. Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the bacteria implicated in the biofilm formation of bacterial plaque, and plays an important role in the progression of periodontal disease. In this systematic review authors have evaluated the literature of the last 10 years on P. gingivalis and all the systemic implications proven. This study therefore evaluates all the districts of the organism in which this bacterium may have implications. From the results it emerges that P. gingivalis has implications in the onset of different systemic pathologies, including rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular pathologies, and neurodegenerative pathologies. Surely, understanding the mechanisms of diffusion of this bacterium, it would be possible to prevent a series of pathologies. Thus, putting the dentist clinician at the center of prevention for these diseases. Full article
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