Special Issue "Oral Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kenji Yamagata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
Interests: oral cancer; orthognathic surgery; cleft lip and palate; implantology; traumatology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The number of patients with oral cancer, especially those of an older age, has been growing. Generally speaking, diagnosis at a low stage is effective for a good prognosis, and recently, a new molecular target drug was found to prolong survival after recurrence and distant metastasis.

Although treatment results can be improved through chemoradiotherapy and surgery with wide resection and reconstruction, older patients suffering from any diseases that prevent the use of surgery and chemotherapy cannot receive aggressive treatment, and we must always consider the treatment appropriate for each patient according to their personal characteristics.

This Special Issue will publish new information on the diagnostics and treatment of oral cancer, including new molecular target drugs, treatment according to patients’ risk factors, complications, and post-treatment functional disorders. Reviews and case reports are welcome for submission.

Dr. Kenji Yamagata
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oral cancer
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Sarcoma
  • Diagnosis
  • Therapy
  • Prognosis
  • Risk factors
  • Surgery
  • Reconstruction
  • Radiotherapy
  • Chemotherapy
  • Molecular target drug
  • Functional disorder
  • Complications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Comparison of Postoperative Bleeding between Application of Polyglycolic Acid Sheet and Primary Closure in Tongue Cancer Patients with Partial Glossectomy
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030085 - 03 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1069
Abstract
The technique of covering a mucosal defect with fibrin glue and a polyglycolic acid sheet (MCFP) for the resection of mucosa is applied in oral cancers. The MCFP technique for partial glossectomy provides faster relief from postoperative pain and the prevention of scar [...] Read more.
The technique of covering a mucosal defect with fibrin glue and a polyglycolic acid sheet (MCFP) for the resection of mucosa is applied in oral cancers. The MCFP technique for partial glossectomy provides faster relief from postoperative pain and the prevention of scar contracture, unlike primary closure. However, it has a major complication of postoperative bleeding. This study sought to compare postoperative bleeding between the MCFP technique and primary closure. We designed a retrospective study with a cohort of 57 patients who underwent partial glossectomy with the MCFP technique or primary closure. Our primary predictor variable was the wound closure procedure (primary closure or the MCFP technique). The primary outcome variable was postoperative bleeding, and the other variables were patient characteristics, excision area and depth, tooth contact for the wound, and antithrombotic therapy. Statistical evaluation was performed with Pearson’s chi-squared test, Welch’s t-test, and multiple logistic regression. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The MCFP technique was selected for cases with a large excision area (1433 vs. 963 mm2, P = 0.029). Total postoperative bleeding occurred in 10 of 57 patients (MCFP technique: 7 of 37 cases; primary closure: 3 of 20 cases). There was no significant difference in bleeding between the two groups (P = 0.71). Postoperative bleeding was significant in patients with antithrombotic therapy (MCFP: 40% vs. primary closure: 2%, P = 0.0024). Postoperative bleeding timing was significantly different in the MCFP technique (6.4 days) from that of primary closure (1 day; P = 0.0076). Postoperative bleeding was not associated with the MCFP technique or primary closure. However, postoperative bleeding with the MCFP technique occurred later than that with primary closure. The MCFP technique is not recommended for patients on antithrombotic therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment)
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Article
The Association between D-Dimer and Prognosis in the Patients with Oral Cancer
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030084 - 03 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 880
Abstract
D-dimer levels are reported to relate with tumor stage, prognosis, and lymph node involvement, as well as overall survival (OS) in patients with solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate association between the value of D-dimer and the prognosis of [...] Read more.
D-dimer levels are reported to relate with tumor stage, prognosis, and lymph node involvement, as well as overall survival (OS) in patients with solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate association between the value of D-dimer and the prognosis of oral cancer (OC). We designed a retrospective cohort study and enrolled a sample of patients who were diagnosed with OC and treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy. The predictor was the D-dimer and outcome variable was OS. Other variables included age, neutrocyte count, neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and management. Differences in OS rate were analyzed by log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to adjust for the effects of potential confounders. Differences with a P value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. In 88 patients with OC, D-dimer median value for the predicting OS was 0.7 µg/mL. There was a significant difference in OS when patients were stratified according to D-dimer, with an OS rate of 77.8% for patients with low D-dimer (<0.7), and 57.3% with high D-dimer (≥0.7) (p = 0.035). Univariate analyses revealed close correlations between OS and age, neutrocyte count, NLR, CRP, and D-dimer (<0.7 and ≥0.7). Cox multivariate analysis identified management (mainly surgery vs. radiotherapy) (HR 3.274, 95% CI 1.397–7.676; p = 0.006) as independent predictive factors for OS. There was a significant difference in OS when patients were stratified according to D-dimer with low (<0.7) and high D-dimer (≥0.7) (p = 0.035). Though, as a predictive factor, management was associated with OS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment)
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Review

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Review
Early Diagnosis on Oral and Potentially Oral Malignant Lesions: A Systematic Review on the VELscope® Fluorescence Method
Dent. J. 2019, 7(3), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7030093 - 04 Sep 2019
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2930
Abstract
The fluorescence method is an innovative technique used by pathologists for examining body mucosa, and for the abnormalities tissue screening, potentially leading to the earlier discovery of pre-cancer, cancer or other disease processes. The early detection is one of the best mechanisms for [...] Read more.
The fluorescence method is an innovative technique used by pathologists for examining body mucosa, and for the abnormalities tissue screening, potentially leading to the earlier discovery of pre-cancer, cancer or other disease processes. The early detection is one of the best mechanisms for enabling treatment success, increasing survival rates and maintaining a high quality of life. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the clinical efficiency of this diagnostic tool applied to the oral cavity (VELscope®). A literature systematic review has been performed. The initial research provided 53 results after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and after a manual screening of the abstracts by the authors, only 25 results were eligible for review. The results and data contained in all the researches, no older than 10 years, were manually evaluated, and provided useful information on this diagnostic method. The VELscope® mean value about sensitivity and specificity resulted of 70.19% and 65.95%, respectively, by results analysis, but despite this some studies disagree about its clinical effectiveness, and this diagnostic method is still much debated in scientific and clinical medical literature. Surely being able to have efficient and effective tools from this point of view could help the clinician in the diagnosis, and also make timelier the pharmacological or surgical therapy, improving the quality of life of the patient, and in some cases guaranteeing a longer survival term. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment)
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Other

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Case Report
Superficial Temporal Artery Perforator Flap: Indications, Surgical Outcomes, and Donor Site Morbidity
Dent. J. 2020, 8(4), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8040117 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1020
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective case series was to discuss indications, surgical outcomes, and donor site morbidity in the use of superficial temporal artery perforator (STAP) flaps in intra-oral or extra-oral facial reconstruction. This study involved 9 patients treated with a STAP flap [...] Read more.
The aim of this retrospective case series was to discuss indications, surgical outcomes, and donor site morbidity in the use of superficial temporal artery perforator (STAP) flaps in intra-oral or extra-oral facial reconstruction. This study involved 9 patients treated with a STAP flap at the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Unit of the University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples. A STAP flap was used alone or in combination with other local flaps, for the coverage of facial soft tissue defects, after the resection of craniofacial malignant tumors (n = 7) or as a salvage flap, in partial or total microvascular flap loss (n = 2). The STAP flap was proven to be a valuable surgical option despite it not being frequently used in facial soft tissue reconstruction nor was it chosen as the first surgical option in patients under 70 year’s old. Donor site morbidity is one of the major reasons why this flap is uncommon. Appropriate patient selection, surgical plan, and post-surgical touch-ups should be performed in order to reduce donor site scar morbidity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment)
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Case Report
Pulmonary Nodule in a Patient with Oral and Lung Cancer: Cryptococcus Infection
Dent. J. 2019, 7(4), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7040102 - 23 Oct 2019
Viewed by 1247
Abstract
Pulmonary nodules are frequently considered to be a metastatic disease or primary lung tumors in oral cancer patients. We present a case of pulmonary cryptococcosis in a 68-year-old man with oral and lung cancer. This lung cancer was treated with thoracoscopic resection of [...] Read more.
Pulmonary nodules are frequently considered to be a metastatic disease or primary lung tumors in oral cancer patients. We present a case of pulmonary cryptococcosis in a 68-year-old man with oral and lung cancer. This lung cancer was treated with thoracoscopic resection of the right inferior lobe and mediastinal lymph node dissection. Lower gingival cancer was treated with a mandibulectomy, neck dissection, and reconstruction after chemoradiotherapy. A 20 mm cavitary nodule appeared at the left lung S6 one-month after surgery, during post-operative computed tomography. Thoracoscopic partial resection of the left inferior lobe was performed under the suspicion of lung metastasis. Pathology results revealed a pseudo-epithelial granuloma with necrosis and many yeast-shaped fungi with capsules. A pathological diagnosis of Cryptococcus infection was made. The patient was prescribed the antifungal agent fosfluconazole, which was administered intravenously for 1 week and intraoral fluconazole for 12 months. No recurrence of the Cryptococcus infection has been noted after 1.5 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment)
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