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Special Issue "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Annamaria Di Fabio

Full Professor Work and Organizational Psychology, Director of the two International Research and Intervention Laboratories: Cross-Cultural Positive Psychology, Prevention, and Sustainability (CroCPosPsychP&S), Psychology for Vocational Guidance, Career Counseling and Talents (LabOProCCareer&T), Department of Education and Psychology (Psychology Section), University of Florence, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Phone: +393387557238
Interests: psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, cross-cultural positive psychology, prevention, work and organizational psychology, talents, positive career outcomes, career decision-making, workplace relational civility, decent work, positive relational-management, intrapreneurial self-capital, acceptance of change, project reflexivity, career counseling, guidance, resiliency, emotional intelligence, personality and individual differences

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Psychology of sustainability and sustainable development represents a new research area in the field of psychology. It responds to sustainability issues that introduce a psychological contribution and promotes a trans-disciplinary perspective. This innovative psychological perspective enlarges the concept of sustainability by overcoming a perspective exclusively based on the ecological and socio-economic environment, and seeks to improve the quality of life of each human being with and in the environments. This approach overcomes the traditional framework based on the three “Es” (economy, equity, ecology) and the traditional definition of sustainability centered on “avoiding” something, in terms of exploitation, depletion, and irreversible alteration. It introduces, on the contrary, a new definition based on “promotion” of something, where the new keywords are enrichment, growth, and flexible change. Psychology of sustainability and sustainable development also introduces a new axis of psychological reflection on what is really sustainable for individuals in the environments (natural, personal, social, organizational...environments). Psychology of sustainability and sustainable development enhances the sustainability of interpersonal and intrapersonal talent as well as of group and communities, including aspects of reflexivity, meaning, purpose, and flourishing for the sustainability of projects harmonizing the different perspectives. It asks for a wide and complex vision, from personal careers and life projects to projects regarding natural, social, organizational environments. Its mission is offering contributions to promote effective and sustainable well-being for individuals and environments from a psychological research perspective.

This special issue is focused on the innovative contribution that psychology can make to the theme of sustainability and sustainable development. It focuses on both healthy and safe environments, and the promotion of well-being and quality of life of individuals in the different environments. The scope is to offer a framework of the current state-of-the-art of theories, and report research on the new topic of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development. The purpose is to collect and present innovative reflections and results of empirical research on this theme.

References:

1. Papers

Di Fabio, A., & Rosen, M. A. (2018). Opening the Black Box of Psychological Processes in the Science of Sustainable Development: A New Frontier. European Journal of Sustainable Development Research, 2(2).

Di Fabio, A., & Kenny, M. E. (2018). Connectedness to Nature, Personality Traits and Empathy from a Sustainability Perspective. Current Psychology.

Di Fabio, A. (2017a). The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development for well-being in organizations. In G. Arcangeli, G. Giorgi, N. Mucci, J.-L. Bernaud, & A. Di Fabio (Eds.), Emerging and re-emerging organizational features, work transitions and occupational risk factors: The good, the bad, the right. An interdisciplinary perspective. Research Topic in Frontiers in Psychology. Organizational Psychology, 8, 1534. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01534

Di Fabio, A. (2017b). Positive Healthy Organizations: Promoting well-being, meaningfulness, and sustainability in organizations. In G. Arcangeli, G. Giorgi, N. Mucci, J.-L. Bernaud, & A. Di Fabio (Eds.), Emerging and re-emerging organizational features, work transitions and occupational risk factors: The good, the bad, the right. An interdisciplinary perspective. Research Topic in Frontiers in Psychology. Organizational Psychology, 8(1938). doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01938

Di Fabio, A., & Bucci, O. (2016). Green positive guidance and green positive life counseling for decent work and decent lives: Some empirical results. In A. Di Fabio & D. L. Blustein (Eds.), From meaning of working to meaningful lives: The challenges of expanding decent work. Research Topic in Frontiers in Psychology. Section Organizational Psychology, 7, 261. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00261

2. Invited keynote and lecture

Di Fabio, A. (2018, November). The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development: critical empirical evidence from a new research area. Keynote at the One-Day International Conference “Strengthening Sustainability Science and its Transdisciplinary Nature: the New Area of the Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development”, University of Florence, 12 November, 2018, Florence, Italy.

Di Fabio, A. (2018, September). The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development for decent work, innovation and social inclusion: theory, research and practice. Keynote at the One-Day International Conference “Decent work and sustainable development: the perspective of existential psychology for innovation and social inclusion”, University of Florence, 21 September, 2018, Florence, Italy.

Di Fabio, A. (2018, August). The Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development: initial evidences from empirical research. Keynote at the Second international conference “Healthier societies fostering healthy organizations: A cross-cultural perspective” University of Florence, August 30-September 1, 2018, Florence, Italy.

Di Fabio, A. (2018, July). The Psychology of Positive Healthy Organizations: the challenges of cross-cultural primary prevention for the construction of individual, contextual, group, community strengths towards harmony and sustainability. Invited keynote speaker at the Ninth International Asian Association of Indigenous and Cultural Psychology (AAICP) Conference “Promoting health, happiness and quality of life: Psychological, social and cultural perspectives”, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Malaysia Sabah, Koto Kinabalu, Malaysia, July 25-27, 2018.

Di Fabio, A. (2017, October). The challenge of Sustainability in the construction and managing of personal project for a decent work and a decent life: Psychological contributions. Invited lecture at the international symposium “Life and career designing for empowerment, sustainable development and decent work”. Chair: Jacques Pouyaud (France). Presenters: Gabriela Aisenson (Argentina), Annamaria Di Fabio (Italy), Maureen E. Kenny & David L. Blustein (USA), Guðbjörg Vilhjálmsdóttir (Iceland). International Conference “Counseling and Support. Decent work, Equity and Inclusion: Password for the present and the future”, University of Padua, Italy, October 5-7, 2017.

Di Fabio, A. (2017, September). Intrapreneurial Self-Capital, well-being and Sustainability in the XXI century: the challenge of primary prevention for healthy organizations. Invited keynote lecture at the 81st Annual Convention of the Japanese Psychological Association (JPA) “Responding the growing social needs and moving on to the next stage”, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan, September 20-22, 2017.

Di Fabio, A. (2016, October). How can career guidance and counseling support the development of talents? The challenge of project sustainability in the construction and managing of the personal project? Invited keynote speaker at the seminar “Supporting and Developing Talents” organized by the Euroguidance Centre Slovakia at the Slovak Academic Association for International Cooperation, Bratislava, Slovakia, October 27, 2016.

Di Fabio, A. (2016, July). Constructing and managing personal project, career project, life project: the challenge of Sustainability. Invited lecture at the seminar organized by the Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, July 30, 2016.

Di Fabio, A. (2016, June). The construction of personal project: the challenge of Sustainability. In A. Di Fabio & J. G. Maree (Moderators), D. L. Blustein (Discussant). “Career-Life Construction and Sustainability”. Workshop at the World Conference of the UNESCO Chair “Lifelong Guidance and Counseling” on “Career and Life Design interventions for sustainable development and decent work”, Wroclaw 2016, University of Wroclaw (Poland), Wroclaw, Poland, 6-8 June 2016.

Di Fabio, A. (2018, August). The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development: first evidences from empirical research. Keynote at the Second international conference “Healthier societies fostering healthy organizations: A cross-cultural perspective” University of Florence, August 30-September 1, 2018, Florence, Italy.

Prof. Dr. Annamaria Di Fabio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychology of sustainability
  • psychology of sustainable development
  • sustainable social and psychological environment
  • attitudes toward the environment
  • psychological respect
  • oxygenating processes
  • harmony and harmonization
  • cross-cultural psychology of sustainability and sustainable development
  • sustainability of interpersonal and intrapersonal talents
  • sustainable management
  • sustainable leadership and leadership for sustainable development
  • sustainability and sustainable development of the human capital
  • intraprenership for sustainability and sustainable development
  • sustainability and sustainable development of entrepreneurship
  • sustainability of the personal career and life project
  • decent work and decent lives
  • reflexivity for sustainability and sustainable development
  • connectenedness to the nature
  • healthy business
  • healthy performances
  • healthy organizations
  • healthy cities
  • healthy societies
  • sustainability and sustainable development for well-being and quality of life of human beings in different contexts (school, university, work, life…) and environments (natural/built, personal, social, organizational…)

Published Papers (60 papers)

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Open AccessArticle Examining Millennials’ Global Citizenship Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions to Engage in Environmental Volunteering
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2324; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082324
Received: 21 January 2019 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
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Abstract
Volunteering for nature conservation has become an important resource in solving local environmental problems of global importance. The study at hand assessed how well millennials’ global citizenship attitudes explain their behavioral intentions to engage in volunteer projects, as well as how prior experience [...] Read more.
Volunteering for nature conservation has become an important resource in solving local environmental problems of global importance. The study at hand assessed how well millennials’ global citizenship attitudes explain their behavioral intentions to engage in volunteer projects, as well as how prior experience of volunteering in environmental projects affects millennials’ global citizenship attitudes. Those who reported past participation in this type of volunteer experience were generally more inclined to partake in future environmental volunteering than those without prior experience. Likewise, for those with prior experience, global citizen factors played a greater role in intentions to experience environmental volunteering. This study makes valuable contributions to the literature surrounding nature conservation, as it illustrates that millennials’ global citizenship attitudes predict participation in environmental volunteering. This work concludes with insights concerning what programs (that provide millennials with opportunities to fulfill environmental duties associated with their global environmental citizenship) can do to provide a more valuable experience for young volunteers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Relationship between Ability-Based Emotional Intelligence, Cognitive Intelligence, and Job Performance
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2299; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082299
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 6 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
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Abstract
Based on previous findings, which found that the three facets of ability-based emotional intelligence (EI) have varying effects on job performance, this study investigates the relationship between emotional intelligence, cognitive intelligence (CI), and job performance. The use of a cascade model suggests a [...] Read more.
Based on previous findings, which found that the three facets of ability-based emotional intelligence (EI) have varying effects on job performance, this study investigates the relationship between emotional intelligence, cognitive intelligence (CI), and job performance. The use of a cascade model suggests a progressive pattern, starting from emotion perception, followed by emotional understanding and emotion regulation, with downstream effects on job performance. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of both measurements, we employed the performance-based ability measurement, the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the self-reporting ability EI measurement, Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS). Our findings supported the cascade model, but in the case of WLEIS measures, both self-emotion appraisal and others’ emotion appraisal precede emotion regulation, leading to a positive effect on job performance. Moreover, CI moderated the relationship between EI and job performance, such that a decline in CI rendered the relationship more positive. The MSCEIT and WLEIS showed similar results, thus supporting the cascading model and moderating effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Double-Edged Effects of Socially Responsible Human Resource Management on Employee Task Performance and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Mediating by Role Ambiguity and Moderating by Prosocial Motivation
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2271; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082271
Received: 22 January 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 8 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
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Abstract
Previous literature has explored the positive effects of socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) on employees, leaving potential dark sides largely ignored. By integrating situational-strength theory and motivation literature, this study investigates the double-edged effects of SRHRM on employee performance. Based on a [...] Read more.
Previous literature has explored the positive effects of socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) on employees, leaving potential dark sides largely ignored. By integrating situational-strength theory and motivation literature, this study investigates the double-edged effects of SRHRM on employee performance. Based on a sample of 314 employee–supervisor dyads from three companies, we found that SRHRM could increase employees’ organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) while decreasing their task performance through role-ambiguity mediation. Interestingly, prosocial motivation serves as a significant moderator in strengthening the positive relationship between SRHRM and OCB and the negative association between SRHRM and task performance. Finally, we discuss the theoretical and practical implications of how managers should conduct SRHRM practices among employees. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle From Psychological Theoretical Assumptions to New Research Perspectives in Sustainability and Sustainable Development: Motivation in the Workplace
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2222; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082222
Received: 1 March 2019 / Revised: 7 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
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Abstract
This article proposes a framework that indicates opportunities for integrating psychology into research on sustainability and sustainable development. The central issue proposed is motivation in the workplace with a strong focus on employee health and optimal functioning. The main methodological issues are formulated [...] Read more.
This article proposes a framework that indicates opportunities for integrating psychology into research on sustainability and sustainable development. The central issue proposed is motivation in the workplace with a strong focus on employee health and optimal functioning. The main methodological issues are formulated in four assumptions: (1) Health from the perspective of health per se; (2) an individual seen as an agent; (3) an agent in the situation and context; (4) the life-span development perspective. The article refers in the narrative review to the most influential conceptualizations and research. This proposition shows a way forward and offers new opportunities to formulate challenging and important research questions in the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Effect of Cognitive Variables and Emotional Variables on Urban Residents’ Recycled Water Reuse Behavior
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2208; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082208
Received: 14 February 2019 / Revised: 7 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
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Abstract
Urban residents’ perception of recycled water reuse is the foundation for the realization of recycled water reuse behavior. However, even though the perception factor is equipped, it does not mean that urban residents will use recycled water continuously for sure. Therefore, in this [...] Read more.
Urban residents’ perception of recycled water reuse is the foundation for the realization of recycled water reuse behavior. However, even though the perception factor is equipped, it does not mean that urban residents will use recycled water continuously for sure. Therefore, in this research, the authors try to put cognitive factors and emotional factors into a unified behavioral process. Based on this theory framework, the paper will interpret the initiation, formation and continuing process of recycled water reuse behavior of urban residents. On the basis of previous studies, this study established a theoretical model to study the influence of cognitive factors and emotional factors on recycled water reuse behavior of the residents. Based on the data of 325 samples, the direct and indirect relationship between the variables in the model is verified through path analysis and mediation analysis. The empirical results show that: firstly, the urban residents’ perception of recycled water reuse can activate their emotion for recycled water, and the emotion includes both positive emotion and negative emotion; secondly, although the recognition of recycled water can stimulate both positive and negative emotional factors, there are great differences between positive and negative emotions on the initiation, formation and sustainability of recycled water behavior. Negative emotion has a certain effect on the initiation of recycled water reuse behavior, but it has no significant effect on the formation and sustainability of recycled water reuse behavior. By contrast, positive emotion has no significant effect on the initiation of recycled water reuse behavior, but it has a significant effect on the formation and sustainability of recycled water reuse behavior. That is to say, at different stages, the recycled water reuse behaviors are affected differently by positive emotions and negative emotions. Thirdly, compared with negative emotional variables, positive emotions have a greater impact on individual recycled water reuse behavior. Positive emotional variables can significantly mediate the impact of cognitive variables on recycled water reuse behavior habits. In other words, positive emotions play a vital role in the sustainability of recycled water reuse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Body Esteem among Korean Adolescent Boys and Girls
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 2051; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11072051
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 29 March 2019 / Accepted: 31 March 2019 / Published: 6 April 2019
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Abstract
Establishing a positive body image is a critical factor for adolescents’ physical and mental health as it leads to sustainable individual growth and development throughout their lives. Therefore, possible personality traits need to be examined for their capability as protective factors for a [...] Read more.
Establishing a positive body image is a critical factor for adolescents’ physical and mental health as it leads to sustainable individual growth and development throughout their lives. Therefore, possible personality traits need to be examined for their capability as protective factors for a healthy body image. The current study examined how one internal personality trait (self-concept clarity) and three external factors (tripartite influence from media, parents, and peers) are associated with adolescents’ internalization of the thin-body ideal and body esteem in a sample of Korean adolescents (N = 1127). Self-concept clarity was identified as a powerful factor that is positively related with body esteem. The results showed that greater self-concept clarity, lower tripartite influences and thin body internalization were related to greater body esteem. Gender differences were found in the relationships between body esteem and the predictor variables. The implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Analyzing the Determinants of Individual Action on Climate Change by Specifying the Roles of Six Values in South Korea
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 1834; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11071834
Received: 13 February 2019 / Revised: 22 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 27 March 2019
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Abstract
The serious problems stemming from climate change require an active response it. This study focuses on the role of value factors in action on climate change. Individuals’ values systematically influence the fundamental orientation of their attitudes and behaviors. Therefore, this study analyzes whether [...] Read more.
The serious problems stemming from climate change require an active response it. This study focuses on the role of value factors in action on climate change. Individuals’ values systematically influence the fundamental orientation of their attitudes and behaviors. Therefore, this study analyzes whether six values, namely: ideology, environmental justice, religiosity, personal norms, scientific optimism, and environmentalism, influence action on climate change directly or indirectly, and compares their effects with perception factors’ impact. The results indicate that religiosity decreased action on climate change, whereas personal norms, science and technology (S&T) optimism, and environmentalism increased such action. Among the perception factors, perceived risks and benefits, trust, and knowledge increased action on climate change. Furthermore, perception factors explained action on climate change more than value factors did. Moreover, value factors (i.e., S&T optimism and environmentalism) moderated the impacts of perceived risks, perceived benefits, and negative emotions on action against climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Accounting for Individual Differences in Connectedness to Nature: Personality and Gender Differences
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1693; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061693
Received: 14 February 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 18 March 2019 / Published: 21 March 2019
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Abstract
In the psychology of sustainability and the sustainable development framework, regarding the specific focus on the natural environment, the construct of connectedness to nature is studied in depth for its potential for environmental management. The present research focuses on individual differences, examining the [...] Read more.
In the psychology of sustainability and the sustainable development framework, regarding the specific focus on the natural environment, the construct of connectedness to nature is studied in depth for its potential for environmental management. The present research focuses on individual differences, examining the relationships between connectedness to nature and the Big Five personality traits in 459 Italian university students. This work analyzes whether gender differences emerge with respect to connectedness to nature, answering a more exploratory research question, since previous studies have not considered this aspect. The results show that agreeableness and extraversion are positively associated with connectedness to nature in Italian university students. No gender differences emerged with respect to connectedness to nature. Also, the relationship between connectedness to nature and personality traits was mainly found to be gender invariant. Future perspectives for research and intervention are offered in the psychology of sustainability and the sustainable development framework. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Translating Sustainability into Action: A Management Challenge in FabLabs
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1676; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061676
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 20 March 2019
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Abstract
In recent years, the number of new organizations aiming to accomplish principles of sustainability has rapidly grown, leading analysts and scholars to announce almost a new industrial revolution. An example of this is the proliferation of the so-called fabrication laboratories (FabLabs) that nowadays [...] Read more.
In recent years, the number of new organizations aiming to accomplish principles of sustainability has rapidly grown, leading analysts and scholars to announce almost a new industrial revolution. An example of this is the proliferation of the so-called fabrication laboratories (FabLabs) that nowadays are perceived as being forerunners in innovative and sustainable high-tech production through peer-to-peer collaborative practices and sharing. However, the challenges managers face in translating these promotional aims into organizational action is vastly understudied. To address this research gap, we have studied the management of two FabLabs, in Italy and Finland. In this study, we draw from a psycho-sociological framework applying cultural-historical activity theory, and especially from the concepts of activity system and contradiction. According to this perspective, a sustainable organization is based on promotion, enrichment, regeneration, and flexible change efforts, and it is related to the managerial and ability to bring internal and external stakeholders together to recognize and solve tensions and contradictions collectively. Through our case studies, we have provided new research knowledge on how managers make an effort to translate sustainability into action in the complex context of FabLabs, involving multiple, often competing stakeholders and activity systems. Our analysis reveals multiple tensions in the collective activity, stemming from system level contradictions, which represent a challenge for the daily work of the FabLab managers. In the paper we also suggest how an engaged management orientation towards sustainably can be promoted, and we discuss future research topics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Employability of Disabled Graduates: Resources for a Sustainable Employment
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1542; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061542
Received: 5 January 2019 / Revised: 22 February 2019 / Accepted: 8 March 2019 / Published: 14 March 2019
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Abstract
In the frame of the psychology of sustainability, this research aims at exploring how the related concepts of risk factors, protective factors, and resilience might inform our understanding of the postgraduate outcomes of disabled youth. The number of disabled students is growing steadily, [...] Read more.
In the frame of the psychology of sustainability, this research aims at exploring how the related concepts of risk factors, protective factors, and resilience might inform our understanding of the postgraduate outcomes of disabled youth. The number of disabled students is growing steadily, nevertheless, relatively little is known about the employment experiences and skill development of disabled youth. Following the positive primary preventive approach, this explorative research investigates the role of resilience and employability resources both in preventing perceived negative impact of disability on the employment opportunities and promoting the perception of employability. Fifty disabled students responded to an online questionnaire and their responses were compared to those of a nondisabled sample (N = 190). Motivations and meanings associated with entry into the workplace are equivalent in the two groups, but perceived impact of disability is a risk factor that hinders perceived employability. Resilience resources and soft skills show their effectiveness in reducing perceived disability impact and improving perceived employability, but between group comparison shows differences in the set of available resources. Overall, results provide insights for implementing actions to promote sustainable employment in order to foster a positive, sustainable organizational development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Internal and External Influential Factors on Waste Disposal Behavior in Public Open Spaces in Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1518; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061518
Received: 12 February 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 6 March 2019 / Published: 13 March 2019
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Abstract
Over the last decade, municipal solid waste generation in Phnom Penh has increased noticeably; however, the waste management system is far from satisfactory. Considerable amount of waste is left uncollected, as well as intentionally disposed of in public open spaces. External and internal [...] Read more.
Over the last decade, municipal solid waste generation in Phnom Penh has increased noticeably; however, the waste management system is far from satisfactory. Considerable amount of waste is left uncollected, as well as intentionally disposed of in public open spaces. External and internal factors can trigger these problems. Possible external factors are low collection frequency, low cleaning services, and insufficient facilities such as small dumpsters. Possible internal factors, which also play an important role in this issue, include low awareness, insufficient knowledge, and low responsibility for personal waste. To examine the influences of these internal and external factors on people’s waste disposal behaviors, we selected and conducted a questionnaire survey at four sites in Phnom Penh that differ in waste collection frequency and population density. A total of 413 valid responses were obtained. We developed a structural equation model to explain people’s intentions not to dispose of waste in public open spaces. The results showed that personal and social norms, such as perception of social pressure from friends and family and from the government, had significant influences on intention, whereas the influence of external factors was much smaller. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle People Make the Difference: An Explorative Study on the Relationship between Organizational Practices, Employees’ Resources, and Organizational Behavior Enhancing the Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1499; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051499
Received: 3 December 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
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Abstract
The most recent developments in the field of sustainability science and the emergence of a psychology of sustainability and sustainable development have contributed to collect evidences about the fact that modern organizations need healthy and motivated employees to survive and to prosper within [...] Read more.
The most recent developments in the field of sustainability science and the emergence of a psychology of sustainability and sustainable development have contributed to collect evidences about the fact that modern organizations need healthy and motivated employees to survive and to prosper within this fast-moving scenario. In this vein, a confirmation to these evidences came from the abundant research on HEalthy and Resilient Organizations (HERO), showing that when organizations make systematic, planned, and proactive efforts to improve employees’ subjective resources then organizational processes and outcomes benefit in turn. Moving forward from these premises, the present study aimed to explore these assumptions within the context of small and medium enterprises (SMEs), investigating the relationships among the organizational practices, employees’ subjective resources, and organizational behaviors. Two hundred and thirty-six participants working in SMEs located in the south of Italy took part. They were invited to fill in a questionnaire investigating their perception of organizational resources and practices (autonomy, leadership, communication, organizational mindfulness, and commitment to resilience), of their individual resources (work engagement and psychological capital), and finally, of some organizational outcomes (extra-role behavior). Results showed that psychological capital was a significant mediator of the relationship between employees’ perception of the organizational resources and practices and extra-role behaviors. Concrete implications of these conclusions in terms of human resource management (HRM) are discussed together with limitations of the study and future developments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle The Interplay between Job Control, SOC Strategies, and Age in Sustaining Work Ability in a Sample of Administrative Employees
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1463; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051463
Received: 5 February 2019 / Revised: 28 February 2019 / Accepted: 1 March 2019 / Published: 9 March 2019
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Abstract
In recent years, the average age of workers has risen. Because of that, work ability is reducing in many sectors, especially in a public context. Given the above, it is necessary to investigate the individual and organisational resources that can play a role [...] Read more.
In recent years, the average age of workers has risen. Because of that, work ability is reducing in many sectors, especially in a public context. Given the above, it is necessary to investigate the individual and organisational resources that can play a role in the protection of work ability. This study investigates the work ability of administrative workers, examines selection, optimisation, and compensation (SOC) as a form of mediation between job control and work ability, and explores the relationship of job control, age, work ability, and SOC strategies via moderated mediation models. The findings indicate that job control, SOC strategies, and age correlate to work ability, but the effect of these factors is different. Job control and SOC strategies are positively related to work ability, and job control positively relates to the use of optimisation and compensation. However, only optimisation and compensation strategies mediate the association between job control and work ability. Finally, age moderates the effect of job control on work ability. The findings suggest that interventions, such as SOC training, promotion, and job control, may help to sustain work ability among elderly administrative workers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle What Determines the Psychological Well-Being during Commute in Xi’an: The Role of Built Environment, Travel Attitude, and Travel Characteristics
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1328; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051328
Received: 22 January 2019 / Revised: 15 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 4 March 2019
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Abstract
The commute well-being (CWB) has been associated with the mental health and depends on the positive or negative emotions that occur during the daily commute. This paper analyzes the influencing factors and discusses the structural relationship between CWB and influencing factors, based on [...] Read more.
The commute well-being (CWB) has been associated with the mental health and depends on the positive or negative emotions that occur during the daily commute. This paper analyzes the influencing factors and discusses the structural relationship between CWB and influencing factors, based on our evaluation of the results for daily CWB between different travel modes. We based our analyses on a CWB survey conducted in the central city proper of Xi’an. In contrast to previous studies, this paper investigates two commuting phases, in the morning and evening, to better analyze daily CWB. To conduct a more comprehensive analysis, in addition to considering multi-stage combined travel, the subjective and objective aspects of factors influencing CWB were deepened and expanded. The measurement was based on the Satisfaction with Travel Scale, which was developed based on a method for measuring subjective well-being. The average CWB level of each model was compared by analyzing the variances. The influencing factors were determined by stepwise regression, and the influence mechanism was analyzed using a structural equation model (SEM). The results indicate that CWB in Xi’an was highest for walking, which was followed, in order, by motorcycle, electric bicycle, staff shuttle bus, bicycle, metro, car, taxi, and bus. The result reflects that commuting by bus is associated with more negative emotions in Xi’an. The results of SEM indicate that the built environment does not directly affect CWB, but it will act on CWB by affecting other factors. The travel attitude, commute mode choice, and other travel characteristics affect each other and affect CWB directly and indirectly. Other travel characteristics has the largest total effect on CWB, and the travel attitudes have the largest direct effect. Without considering the travel attitude, reducing traffic congestion, commuting time, and transfer times can significantly improve CWB and reduce negative emotions in the future in Xi’an. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Burnout Precursors in Oncology Nurses: A Preliminary Cross-Sectional Study with a Systemic Organizational Analysis
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1246; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051246
Received: 25 January 2019 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
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Abstract
Burnout negatively affects nurses’ health and performance. Healthcare managers have an ethical duty to create healthy organizations that reduce burnout, especially within critical settings such as oncology. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to measure the presence of nurses’ burnout to [...] Read more.
Burnout negatively affects nurses’ health and performance. Healthcare managers have an ethical duty to create healthy organizations that reduce burnout, especially within critical settings such as oncology. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to measure the presence of nurses’ burnout to formulate organizational strategies to prevent the syndrome onset, and (2) to evaluate the effect of recent organizational changes on the burnout phenomenon. A descriptive, cross-sectional design supported by a systemic organizational analysis was conducted in a Swiss Oncology Institute in 2013. Of 103 nurses working in the Institute, 52 (51.4%) completed the Burnout Potential Inventory (BPI) questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Burnout risk levels were low to moderate. Only 2 nurses out of the 52 showed moderate burnout risk levels. Inpatient nurses showed a higher risk of burnout than outpatient nurses, particularly due to ambiguity and feelings of powerlessness. Nurses with post-basic education showed a higher risk when considering poor teamwork values and ambiguity in the workplace. Poor middle-management was found to negatively influence worker wellbeing. The working environment set by management resulted in low burnout risk levels. Managers must carefully select middle-management because inappropriate leadership might promote the onset of burnout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle The Contributions of Personality Traits and Emotional Intelligence to Intrapreneurial Self-Capital: Key Resources for Sustainability and Sustainable Development
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1240; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051240
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 19 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
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Abstract
In the innovative research area of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, Intrapreneurial Self-Capital (ISC) constitutes a promising core of resources to face the challenges of the 21st century. This article presents two studies supporting the contribution of trait emotional intelligence to [...] Read more.
In the innovative research area of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, Intrapreneurial Self-Capital (ISC) constitutes a promising core of resources to face the challenges of the 21st century. This article presents two studies supporting the contribution of trait emotional intelligence to ISC beyond that explained by the three most quoted personality trait models. The Intrapreneurial Self-Capital Scale (ISCS), Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF), Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ), Mini International Personality Item Pool Scale (Mini-IPIP), HEXACO-60, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised Short Form (EPQ-RS) were administered to 210 first and second year university students (Study 1) and 206 university students in the last three years of undergraduate university studies (Study 2). Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that Emotional Intelligence (EI) explained additional variance in ISC beyond that accounted for each of the three personality trait models for both samples. These results should encourage future research within a positive primary prevention perspective in the framework of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Decent Work as a Necessary Condition for Sustainable Well-Being. A Tale of Pi(i)gs and Farmers
Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 1051; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11041051
Received: 11 December 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2019 / Accepted: 14 February 2019 / Published: 18 February 2019
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Abstract
This article analyzes with a holistic and systematic approach the state of working conditions in the European labor market after the crisis, as well as their effects on worker well-being. For this, a distinction will be made between the southern countries most affected, [...] Read more.
This article analyzes with a holistic and systematic approach the state of working conditions in the European labor market after the crisis, as well as their effects on worker well-being. For this, a distinction will be made between the southern countries most affected, namely Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece, and Spain (Piigs), and the northern countries that are, a priori, less damaged by the crisis (Farmers). The samples integrate 7867 workers from the five Piigs countries (36.2%) and 13,894 from the 10 Farmers countries (63.8%). The results have broadly confirmed the research purposes and they established that ensuring well-being is the key to sustainability, growth, and success for workers, groups, and organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Are More Intelligent People Happier? Emotional Intelligence as Mediator between Need for Relatedness, Happiness and Flourishing
Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 1022; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11041022
Received: 29 December 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 13 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
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Abstract
The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development aims to study the personal characteristics that promote effective and sustainable well-being for individuals and environments from a psychological research perspective. According to the self-determination theory, the psychological need for relatedness is positively associated with happiness [...] Read more.
The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development aims to study the personal characteristics that promote effective and sustainable well-being for individuals and environments from a psychological research perspective. According to the self-determination theory, the psychological need for relatedness is positively associated with happiness and flourishing. In turn, emotional intelligence, i.e., understanding and managing one’s own emotions and recognizing others’ emotions, may play a key role in this association. Therefore, the present study investigates the mediating role of emotional intelligence in the relationship between need for relatedness and both happiness and flourishing. Basic Psychological Needs scales (BPNs), Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS), Flourishing Scale, and Happiness Scale were administered to 216 Italian participants (age range 15–66 years old). A mediation model via a structural equation model for path analysis was tested. The results showed that the psychological need for relatedness positively associated with both happiness and flourishing and that emotional intelligence mediated these associations. These results suggest that important interventions may be performed to promote flourishing and happiness, enhancing emotional intelligence through specific training differently from need for relatedness that, instead, can be considered substantially stable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Why We Should Empty Pandora’s Box to Create a Sustainable Future: Hope, Sustainability and Its Implications for Education
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 893; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030893
Received: 29 December 2018 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 9 February 2019
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Abstract
(1) Hope and optimism are strongly connected to physical and psychological health and have been much researched in the field of positive psychology. Research has shown that hope is connected to pro-environmental behavior and plays an important role in ESD. (2) In order [...] Read more.
(1) Hope and optimism are strongly connected to physical and psychological health and have been much researched in the field of positive psychology. Research has shown that hope is connected to pro-environmental behavior and plays an important role in ESD. (2) In order to operationalize hope and optimism, in a survey, 2564 young people and 525 teachers in Germany assessed the probability and desirability of predefined future scenarios. (3) Only every fourth respondent is optimistic regarding the global future. The biggest discrepancy between expectation and desirability exists with regard to climate change. Latent class analysis revealed four classes, whereby 50% of the participants are “sustainability-affine but disillusioned”. This half of the sample has great potential to promote a sustainable future: For them, a positive socio-ecological future has by far the highest value. They report the strongest emotions regarding SD and want to take the most responsibility for SD. Surprisingly, they do not disclose more sustainable behavior in comparison to the other classes. (4) The low expectation of positive socio-ecological developments might be a central factor in preventing half of the sample from behaving more sustainable and indicating a strong potential for hope. The implications for Education for Sustainable Development are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Psychometric Properties of the Intrapreneurial Self-Capital Scale in Malaysian University Students
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 881; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030881
Received: 17 January 2019 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 8 February 2019
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Abstract
The Intrapreneurial Self-Capital Scale (ISCS) is a 28-item measure intended to measure individual resources used to manage career and life challenges. The Intrapreneurial Self-Capital (ISC) is a higher order construct composed of seven specific constructs: core self-evaluation, hardiness, resilience, creative self-efficacy, decisiveness, goal [...] Read more.
The Intrapreneurial Self-Capital Scale (ISCS) is a 28-item measure intended to measure individual resources used to manage career and life challenges. The Intrapreneurial Self-Capital (ISC) is a higher order construct composed of seven specific constructs: core self-evaluation, hardiness, resilience, creative self-efficacy, decisiveness, goal mastery, and vigilance. In the new research area of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, ISC constitutes a promising core of resources to face the challenges of the 21st century. The aim of the current study was to determine the factor structure and psychometric properties (i.e., reliability and concurrent validity) of a Malaysian version of ISCS among university students. The self-report questionnaire was administered to 1491 university students in Sabah, Malaysia. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed to assess the latent structure of the Malaysian ISCS. The final indices of Goodness of Fit showed satisfactory fit to the data. The Cronbach’s alpha of the Malaysian ISCS is 0.81. The Malaysian ISCS correlates with Career Adaptability r = 0.31 (p < 0.01) and with Life Project Reflexivity r = 0.44 (p < 0.01), thus showing an adequate concurrent validity evidence. The Malaysian ISCS provides a promising research area in psychology (both positive and sustainability). Malaysian parents, teachers and counselors can also use this tool for their development and intervention efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Toward a Sustainable Future: The Case of the Municipality of Milan
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030876
Received: 29 December 2018 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 8 February 2019
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Abstract
In the new framework of the Psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, this paper addresses the issue of building socially sustainable processes to develop a better quality of life in an urban context. The aim is to explore and highlight the connection between [...] Read more.
In the new framework of the Psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, this paper addresses the issue of building socially sustainable processes to develop a better quality of life in an urban context. The aim is to explore and highlight the connection between the acknowledgment of a pluralistic and multi-stakeholder scenario, the entwined implications for sustainability at different levels (personal, social, organizational), and the enhancement of the participatory process of planning for future accomplishments. A case study supported by the Municipality of Milano (Italy) is analyzed with the aim to understand the key issues to improve the well-being of the citizens. The paper describes the context of the experience, highlighting the Delphi approach adopted and the ways applied to involve citizens in urban development policies. Discussion and conclusions address the lesson learnt from the case study, pointing out how to prompt and nurture sharing and knowing opportunities and the specific conditions that can support plural stakeholders’ engagement in a sustainable urban future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle The Mobile Emotional Intelligence Test (MEIT): An Ability Test to Assess Emotional Intelligence at Work
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030827
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 5 February 2019
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Abstract
The present study analyzes the Mobile Emotional Intelligence Test (MEIT), a new ability-test to assess emotional intelligence (EI) in a digital way. Taking into account the importance of emotional competencies in the study of employees’ wellbeing and performance, the instrument tested is based [...] Read more.
The present study analyzes the Mobile Emotional Intelligence Test (MEIT), a new ability-test to assess emotional intelligence (EI) in a digital way. Taking into account the importance of emotional competencies in the study of employees’ wellbeing and performance, the instrument tested is based on the most supported ability model (Four-branch Mayer and Salovey Model), and it evaluates emotional capacity through nine different emotional tasks. A total of 1549 participants (841 women and 708 men) with an average age of 27.77 (SD = 8.75) fulfilled the MEIT, consisting of 42 items. The score on the test is based on expert judgments: professional psychologists and emotional intelligence specialists. In addition to the MEIT test, a series of questionnaires was used to assess relevant constructs which research has shown to be related to EI (general intelligence, personality traits, and life satisfaction); besides, another measure of emotional intelligence trait (TMMS-24) was included. The results showed that the MEIT is a reliable and valid test that is useful for both scientific research and individual assessment. Statistical analysis provides evidence of the reliability and validity of the three-factor structure of the questionnaire. Moreover, internal consistency measures were high. In line with previous studies, MEIT maintains the expected relationships with the rest of the constructs studied. Finally, the limitations of the present study and the need for future research on emotional intelligence assessment are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Locus of Control: The Mediation Effect between Emotional Stability and Pro-Environmental Behavior
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 820; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030820
Received: 25 December 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 5 February 2019
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Abstract
Locus of control is a crucial factor in pro-environmental behavior. However, studies on pro-environmental behavior investigating the predisposing factors of internal locus of control are limited. Therefore, the objective of this study further explored the predisposing factors of locus of control and revealed [...] Read more.
Locus of control is a crucial factor in pro-environmental behavior. However, studies on pro-environmental behavior investigating the predisposing factors of internal locus of control are limited. Therefore, the objective of this study further explored the predisposing factors of locus of control and revealed that emotional stability may be a predisposing factor for internal locus of control and pro-environmental behavior. A questionnaire survey was conducted in Taiwan (n = 473) and the responses were explored using structural equation modeling path analysis. The results revealed that emotional stability can promote pro-environmental behavior through the mediation effect of internal locus of control, indicating that emotional stability is a predisposing factor for locus of control-generated pro-environmental behavior. Thus, the study results indicated that people with higher emotional stability and a stronger internal locus of control are more likely to engage in pro-environmental behavior. Hence, to promote pro-environmental behavior through environmental protection education, people’s self-control awareness must be strengthened to enable them to remain calm and peaceful. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Communicating Sustainability: Using Community Media to Influence Rural People’s Intention to Adopt Sustainable Behaviour
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 812; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030812
Received: 10 November 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 4 February 2019
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Abstract
Sustainable development is a big challenge for developing countries, due to lack of effective communication about sustainability to the rural population. This paper aims at building a theoretically and statistically sound model to communicate sustainability more effectively in rural areas in order to [...] Read more.
Sustainable development is a big challenge for developing countries, due to lack of effective communication about sustainability to the rural population. This paper aims at building a theoretically and statistically sound model to communicate sustainability more effectively in rural areas in order to achieve sustainable development. To this end, the constructs and items of the hypothesised model are identified, based on a focus group discussion and backed by the literature reviewed. Both partial least squares and covariance-based structural equation modelling approaches were used to test the hypotheses and validate the model against multiple indices after analysing survey data collected from 300 community radio listeners in Bangladesh. It was found that the unique media characteristics of community radio positively increased the acceptability of sustainability communications, which in turn affects the behavioural determinants (popular theory: attitudes, self-efficacy belief and social norms) and changed the intention to adopt sustainable behaviour. Example cases from around the world also support the statistically sound model. The paper also provides implications and directions for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Towards Sustainable Organizations: Supervisor Support, Commitment to Change and the Mediating Role of Organizational Identification
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 805; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030805
Received: 24 December 2018 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 3 February 2019
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Abstract
According to psychology of sustainability, healthy organizations conduct successful businesses, regenerate employees’ belongingness, and promote organizational and individual growth and change. In line with this assumption, this study investigates: a) The relation between perceived supervisor support and the affective, normative, and continuance components [...] Read more.
According to psychology of sustainability, healthy organizations conduct successful businesses, regenerate employees’ belongingness, and promote organizational and individual growth and change. In line with this assumption, this study investigates: a) The relation between perceived supervisor support and the affective, normative, and continuance components of commitment to change (CtC), and b) the mediating role of organizational identification on the relation between perceived supervisor support and components of CtC. Participants were 243 employees of a company that, in order to introduce a new organizational vision, was implementing multiple change initiatives. Results show the direct effect of perceived supervisor support on affective and normative CtC, the partial mediating effect of organizational identification on affective and normative CtC, and the full mediating effect on continuance CtC. Such results extend previous studies and are in line with the assumptions of the psychology of sustainability: Supervisor support can be considered as a primary preventive intervention that increases employees’ belongingness and encourages them to commit to change initiatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Perceived Job Insecurity and Sustainable Wellbeing: Do Coping Strategies Help?
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030784
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
For workers, perceived job insecurity represents a threat and an obstacle towards achieving a decent and sustainable dimension of wellbeing at work and in life. Using the theoretical background of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, the aim of this study is [...] Read more.
For workers, perceived job insecurity represents a threat and an obstacle towards achieving a decent and sustainable dimension of wellbeing at work and in life. Using the theoretical background of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, the aim of this study is to deepen the relation between subjective job insecurity, self-related health and life satisfaction considering the effect of personal resources, such as specific coping strategies that people may undertake facing job insecurity perceptions. The hypotheses were tested in a convenience sample of 769 employees in France. Data were collected with a self-report questionnaire and analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Science (IBM SPSS). Results showed that job insecurity was negatively related to self-reported health and life satisfaction; furthermore, problem-focused coping of the type of job, social support and training searching behaviors resulted in worsening this negative relationship. This study expanded the understanding of coping in the context of job insecurity and showed the limitations that proactive coping strategies have against job insecurity. These results encourage the debate on how far is it possible to attain sustainable wellbeing by relying on personal resources when job insecurity is experienced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Post-1990s College Students Academic Sustainability: The Role of Negative Emotions, Achievement Goals, and Self-efficacy on Academic Performance
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 775; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030775
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 26 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
In 1982, the “one-child policy” was implemented by China’s Constitution, which led to the majority of post-1990s college students in China being the only child in their family. Unique characteristics have been demonstrated in psychological development of post-1990s Chinese college students due to [...] Read more.
In 1982, the “one-child policy” was implemented by China’s Constitution, which led to the majority of post-1990s college students in China being the only child in their family. Unique characteristics have been demonstrated in psychological development of post-1990s Chinese college students due to the lack of sibling companionship, and the relationship between their psychological state and academic performance can affect their future academic sustainability. This paper used Beijing College Students Panel Survey (BCSPS) data to study the role of negative emotions, achievement goals, and academic self-efficacy on academic performance and gives a panoramic description of the China’s post-1990s college students’ psychological states based on the four-year data of more than 2000 college students who enrolled in 2008. We then used regression analysis and a two-way fixed effect model to study the effects of the psychological state on academic performance. The research conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) The levels of negative emotions, achievement goals, and academic self-efficacy vary according to the grade and gender of college students; (2) among all negative emotions discussed, only anxiety presents a significant predictive effect on academic performance, while the effect of stress and depression is not significant; (3) the presence of level of mastery–approach goals is higher than the other three achievement goals, and college students’ academic self-efficacy keeps decreasing from freshman to junior year; (4) performance–approach goals and academic self-efficacy are identified as having a significant promoting effect on academic performance; (5) mastery–avoidance goals and performance–avoidance goals are proven to have a negative effect on academic performance. This paper discusses the contribution of the psychological sustainability and sustainable development to college students’ academic performance from a primary intervention perspective. We believe that it is feasible to improve academic achievement by improving noncognitive factors, such as mental state, to achieve academic sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Self-Perceived Employability and Meaningful Work: The Mediating Role of Courage on Quality of Life
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 764; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030764
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
The concept of sustainability, from a psychological point of view, can be related to the promotion of personal resources that help people to find decent and meaningful work and live quality lives. In the psychological concept of sustainability and sustainable development, the sustainability [...] Read more.
The concept of sustainability, from a psychological point of view, can be related to the promotion of personal resources that help people to find decent and meaningful work and live quality lives. In the psychological concept of sustainability and sustainable development, the sustainability of careers is related not only to individual career management, but also to the possibility for individuals to obtain a good quality of life despite the frequent changes and the unpredictability of the work context. The present study focuses on the constructs of self-perceived employability and meaningful work, analyzing their relationships with workers’ quality of life. An empirical study was conducted on 660 Italian workers using the following measures: Self-perceived employability scale, work and meaning inventory, courage measure, satisfaction with life scale, and the flourishing scale. The results showed direct effects of employability and meaningful work on the indicators of quality of life (life satisfaction and flourishing); moreover, indirect effects of employability and meaningful work on the quality of life were found to be caused by the mediation of courage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle From Psychology of Sustainability to Sustainability of Urban Spaces: Promoting a Primary Prevention Approach for Well-Being in the Healthy City Designing. A Waterfront Case Study in Livorno
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030760
Received: 6 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 21 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
One of the main objectives of contemporary society and international research is to improve the physical and psychological health and well-being of the population, especially within the urban space. An effective approach to address this complex issue must necessarily be trans-disciplinary, and must [...] Read more.
One of the main objectives of contemporary society and international research is to improve the physical and psychological health and well-being of the population, especially within the urban space. An effective approach to address this complex issue must necessarily be trans-disciplinary, and must be framed in the broader perspective of the Science of Sustainability, in particular the Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development, as a frame of reference. The study shows the first results of research, in terms of methodology and qualitative analysis, with the following objectives—identification of the criteria for intervention for a healthy city design, with particular attention to the psychological, architectural, and construction aspects, and an initial verification of these criteria, through a case study consisting of a section of the city’s waterfront, in the city of Livorno. This case study has enabled, both, the definition of an innovative design and implementation of solutions, for the correct use, accessibility, and management of spaces. It provides the first evaluation of a possible digital analyses of a waterfront, before and after intervention; and highlights the potential and the critical aspects of the process of recovery and re-appropriation of an urban space, for a new social life, within it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle The “Local Town Market Area” in Enna, Sicily: Using the Psychology of Sustainability to Propose Sustainable and Developmental Policies
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 486; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020486
Received: 29 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 17 January 2019
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Abstract
Ritualization operated by analyzing macro-sectors in a city (e.g., neighborhoods) has concluded irreversibly for condemning some dilapidated areas instead of others. Taking its cue from the scenario of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, particularly Goal 11—Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (United [...] Read more.
Ritualization operated by analyzing macro-sectors in a city (e.g., neighborhoods) has concluded irreversibly for condemning some dilapidated areas instead of others. Taking its cue from the scenario of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, particularly Goal 11—Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (United Nations)—the realized analysis links a sustainable urban design with the citizens’ role in the city in a particular urban landmark, the “local town market area” (LTMA), with a focus on developing the well-being of the local community, also referred to as the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development. Principal methods of inquiry used, along a geospatial Google-driven investigation, were self-observation and self-assessment, which reflect both the study of self-organizing systems in the context of complexity and systemic theory, choosing to detect the spatial state of a specific area, as it has neither official nor institutional boundaries. The approach to crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is therefore discussed through the maximizing of the LTMA functional urban unit in Enna, Sicily, to reach the idea of a community that is innovative and participatory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Unsustainable Working Conditions: The Association of Destructive Leadership, Use of Technology, and Workload with Workaholism and Exhaustion
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020446
Received: 29 December 2018 / Revised: 13 January 2019 / Accepted: 14 January 2019 / Published: 16 January 2019
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Abstract
Job demands typical of the current working environments and negative leadership styles may be considered unsustainable factors able to decrease workers well-being. Moreover, contrary to the idea that workaholism is an innate individual characteristic, a recent perspective considers the working context able to [...] Read more.
Job demands typical of the current working environments and negative leadership styles may be considered unsustainable factors able to decrease workers well-being. Moreover, contrary to the idea that workaholism is an innate individual characteristic, a recent perspective considers the working context able to foster its insurgence. In order to investigate unsustainable dynamics within organizations, this study aimed at examining whether (1) destructive leadership increases workload and supplemental work supported by technology, (2) the three job demands increases workaholism, and (3) workaholism mediates their relationship with exhaustion. A convenience sample of 432 workers filled in a self-report questionnaire. The structural equation model results showed a positive relationship between destructive leadership and workload, off-work hour Technology-Assisted Job Demand (off-TAJD), and workaholism. Moreover, both workload and off-TAJD partially mediated the relationship between destructive leadership and workaholism. Finally, workaholism was a mediator between the three demands and exhaustion. The study confirmed a positive association between job demands and workaholism, and, in turn, their association with exhaustion, highlighting in particular the role of two under-investigated determinants, namely destructive leadership and off-TAJD, as unsustainable working conditions. Despite limitations, above all the cross-sectional design, this study provided useful indications for research and practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Seeking Challenges, Individual Adaptability and Career Growth in the Relationship between Workload and Contextual Performance: A Two-Wave Study
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020422
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 10 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
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Abstract
Based on the theoretical approach of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development and on the theoretical Job Demands-Resources model, this contribution aims to explore the mediating effect of seeking challenges on the relationship between workload and contextual performance and the moderating effects [...] Read more.
Based on the theoretical approach of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development and on the theoretical Job Demands-Resources model, this contribution aims to explore the mediating effect of seeking challenges on the relationship between workload and contextual performance and the moderating effects of individual adaptability and organizational career growth in this process. The study involved a convenience sample from different occupational sectors. Data from 178 employees were collected with a self-report questionnaire administered at times T1 and T2 (six months later) and then analyzed through conditional process analysis. Challenging job demands (T1) fully mediated the relationship between workload (T1) and contextual performance (T2); furthermore, individual adaptability (T1) moderated the relationship between workload (T1) and challenging job demands (T1), and organizational career growth (T2) moderated the relationship between challenging job demands (T1) and contextual performance (T2). The results imply that seeking challenges can represent an effective approach to promote sustainable development through improvement of performance at work, maintaining its sustainability over time. The present study is innovative because in the new framework of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development is able to link workload, seeking challenges, career growth and performance in a two-wave study that not only has theoretical implications for organizations but also operative and practical spillovers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle The Common Good Provision Scale (CGP): A Tool for Assessing People’s Orientation towards Economic and Social Sustainability
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020370
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 6 January 2019 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 12 January 2019
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Abstract
Many governments and institutions are currently challenged with insecurity, economic instability, and ongoing turbulence which may undermine the quality of life of each human being and the sustainable development of civil society. As this kind of sustainable development is strictly related to the [...] Read more.
Many governments and institutions are currently challenged with insecurity, economic instability, and ongoing turbulence which may undermine the quality of life of each human being and the sustainable development of civil society. As this kind of sustainable development is strictly related to the promotion of the ‘common good’, it is of paramount importance to understand the different motives that lead people to give their contribution to the common good, in order to sustainably align individual needs with the needs of the society. By adopting a psychological perspective for the promotion of the sustainable development, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a new metric, the Common Good Provision scale (CGP), to assess people’s orientation towards economic and social sustainability. Items were generated from a preliminary qualitative study investigating meaning and representations on the common good and its provision. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were undertaken to validate and improve the scale. The final scale, which consists of seven items, contains two dimensions: Accessibility (i.e., making the common good accessible to anyone and fulfilling people’s basic needs) and Personal Gain (i.e., getting a return and personal advantage in exchange for one’s contribution). In addition, we tested a model in relation to a specific form of contribution: Paying taxes and making charitable donations, that are two complementary ways to financially provide for the common good. It was found that when the Accessibility motive prevails, people are more willing to pay taxes and make donations, whereas when the Personal Gain motive prevails, people are more likely to commit tax evasion and less willing to make monetary donations. The study is novel in that it represents the first attempt to develop a metric to assess people’s motives towards the common good provision. Potentialities and further applications of the CGP scale to other contexts are discussed in relation to the promotion of people’s wellbeing and sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Positive Relational Management for Sustainable Development: Beyond Personality Traits—The Contribution of Emotional Intelligence
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 330; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020330
Received: 3 September 2018 / Revised: 6 December 2018 / Accepted: 4 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
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Abstract
Positive relationships are of major importance in our personal and working lives for promoting well-being, and fostering healthy and sustainable organizations. The research literature suggests that emotional intelligence is a key factor in promoting and maintaining positive relationships. We examined the association between [...] Read more.
Positive relationships are of major importance in our personal and working lives for promoting well-being, and fostering healthy and sustainable organizations. The research literature suggests that emotional intelligence is a key factor in promoting and maintaining positive relationships. We examined the association between trait emotional intelligence and positive relational management in Italian workers, controlling for the effects of personality traits. Participants were administered the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ), the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF) and the Positive Relational Management Scale (PRMS). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that trait emotional intelligence explained an additional 14–16% of the variance beyond personality traits in relation to positive relational management in workers. These results underscore the relationship between trait emotional intelligence and positive relational management, offering new opportunities for promoting both personal well-being and healthy and sustainable organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Intrapreneurial Self-Capital and Sustainable Innovative Behavior within Organizations
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020322
Received: 13 December 2018 / Revised: 27 December 2018 / Accepted: 4 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
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Abstract
Innovative behavior is necessary to combat the 21st century’s sustainability challenges, as well as to ensure organizations’ longevity and success. Personality traits, such as extraversion, are strongly related to innovative behavior; nevertheless, such traits are not increasable through specific training. Intrapreneurial self-capital is [...] Read more.
Innovative behavior is necessary to combat the 21st century’s sustainability challenges, as well as to ensure organizations’ longevity and success. Personality traits, such as extraversion, are strongly related to innovative behavior; nevertheless, such traits are not increasable through specific training. Intrapreneurial self-capital is a promising preventive resource to enhance people’s capability to cope with innovations. On this basis, this study analyzed, in an explorative way, the relationship between extraversion, intrapreneurial self-capital, and innovative behavior, using a sample of 120 Italian workers. A mediation model was used to assess the effects of extraversion on innovative behavior and innovative implementation behavior (outcome variables) through intrapreneurial self-capital (conceived as an intervening mediator variable). The mediation analysis highlighted that intrapreneurial self-capital is correlated with both workers’ innovative behavior and innovative implementation behavior. Therefore, implementing dedicated training on intrapreneurial self-capital could help organizations better address sustainability issues and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals introduced by the United Nations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle The Role of Service Providers’ Resilience in Buffering the Negative Impact of Customer Incivility on Service Recovery Performance
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010285
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 23 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 8 January 2019
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Abstract
In the service sector, customer-related social stressors may weaken employees’ well-being, impairing job-related outcomes. Drawing on the Conservation of Resources theory and on the psychology of sustainability, fostering personal resources become critical to encourage service providers who can effectively manage such job demands. [...] Read more.
In the service sector, customer-related social stressors may weaken employees’ well-being, impairing job-related outcomes. Drawing on the Conservation of Resources theory and on the psychology of sustainability, fostering personal resources become critical to encourage service providers who can effectively manage such job demands. This study investigated how customer-related social stressors and customer orientation influence service recovery performance and whether resilience buffers the negative effects of customer incivility on service recovery performance. One hundred and fifty-seven Italian customer-contact employees completed a questionnaire analyzing customer incivility, customer-related social stressors, resilience, customer orientation, and service recovery performance. Regression analyses and SEMs were conducted. Although all customer-related social stressors indirectly and negatively influenced service recovery performance by increasing burnout symptoms, customer incivility only exerted a direct and detrimental impact on service recovery performance. Customer orientation was directly and positively associated with service recovery performance. Highly resilient employees were less affected by variations in service recovery performance across customer incivility levels. Within the psychology of sustainability framework, promoting resilient workplaces is crucial to foster healthy and sustainable work settings. Service organizations can greatly benefit from providing their employees with psychological resilience training programs, cultivating high customer-oriented attitudes through mentoring sessions, and hiring highly customer-oriented and resilient employees for customer-contact occupations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Social Psychological Theories and Sustainable Second Language Learning: A Model Comparison Approach
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010016
Received: 9 December 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 20 December 2018
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Abstract
The purposes of the present study are two-fold: (1) To examine whether social psychological variables, such as attitude and subjective norm, can predict South Korean English as a foreign language high school students’ intention to learn English, and (2) to identify the best [...] Read more.
The purposes of the present study are two-fold: (1) To examine whether social psychological variables, such as attitude and subjective norm, can predict South Korean English as a foreign language high school students’ intention to learn English, and (2) to identify the best social psychological model for sustainable second language learning in the context of South Korean English as a foreign language (EFL) learning. A total of 614 South Korean high school learners of English participated in the present study. Data collected from a survey questionnaire were analyzed using a structural equation modeling procedure. Results of the present study indicate that South Korean high school students’ attitudes toward learning English and subjective norms made a significant and independent contribution to the variance in their intention to study English. Among the three competing social psychological models examined in the current study, the theory of Planned Behavior and an expanded model of Gardner’s Socio-educational Model proved to be the most effective in terms of the strength of path coefficients and explanatory power. Theoretical and pedagogical implications are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Integrating Personal and Career Counseling to Promote Sustainable Development and Change
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 4176; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10114176
Received: 4 September 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
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Abstract
This article reports on the integration of personal and career counseling to promote sustainable development and change. An explorative, descriptive, instrumental, single-case study approach was followed. Qualitative and quantitative data collection strategies were used to collect data, and an integrative career construction counseling [...] Read more.
This article reports on the integration of personal and career counseling to promote sustainable development and change. An explorative, descriptive, instrumental, single-case study approach was followed. Qualitative and quantitative data collection strategies were used to collect data, and an integrative career construction counseling intervention was conducted. The intervention comprised, first, elicitation of the participant’s micro- and meso-career-life stories; second, integration of these stories into a coherent macro-story, with the participant’s authorization of the narrative; and, third, co-construction by the participant and the counselor of action steps to facilitate action and forward movement. Integrating personal and career counseling helped to address the participants’ deep-seated personal needs while simultaneously addressing his career counseling needs. Longitudinal, qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods research is essential to determine the value and importance of integrating personal and career counseling. This study contributed to expanding the research on interventions that integrate personal and career counseling, promoting the development of sustainable career-life projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Escape from Working Poverty: Steps toward Sustainable Livelihood
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 4144; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10114144
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 31 October 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 11 November 2018
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Abstract
Working poverty affects over half the world’s working population, yet we know remarkably little about the role of wages in transitioning toward sustainable livelihood. We develop and test a model whereby as pay approaches a living wage range, pay fairness becomes clearly associated [...] Read more.
Working poverty affects over half the world’s working population, yet we know remarkably little about the role of wages in transitioning toward sustainable livelihood. We develop and test a model whereby as pay approaches a living wage range, pay fairness becomes clearly associated with work–life balance; this in turn links to job satisfaction, which is a four-step process at the psychological level. We further extend this by testing a moderated mediated model, whereby income level is tested as a boundary condition. Using data from N = 873 New Zealand employees, we focus on relatively low-waged employees across three levels of income: up to $20,000, $20–40,000, and $40–60,000, with the last band straddling the New Zealand Living Wage. We find strong support for pay fairness predicting work–life balance and job satisfaction, with work–life balance mediating the relationship toward job satisfaction. In addition, we find direct effects from income to work–life balance, although not job satisfaction. Furthermore, two-way moderation is supported toward work–life balance and job satisfaction, with higher income employees reporting higher outcomes when fairness is high. The index of moderated mediation is also significantly supporting, indicating that work–life balance has a stronger mediation effect as income rises. Thus, as workers emerged from working poverty, pay fairness, and in turn work–life balance, became psychologically more salient for happiness at work, implying that a pathway to Sustainable Development Goal 8 includes at least three psychological steps, in addition to the pecuniary issue of pay: fairness, work–life balance, and job satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Promoting the Sustainability of Organizations: Contribution of Transformational Leadership to Job Engagement
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 4109; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10114109
Received: 19 September 2018 / Revised: 24 October 2018 / Accepted: 6 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
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Abstract
The psychology of sustainability highlights the importance of building organizational environments promoting the employees’ well-being, and leaders play an important role in it. Drawing from Kahn’s theory, the purpose of this study is to simultaneously examine the mediating role of task significance, perceived [...] Read more.
The psychology of sustainability highlights the importance of building organizational environments promoting the employees’ well-being, and leaders play an important role in it. Drawing from Kahn’s theory, the purpose of this study is to simultaneously examine the mediating role of task significance, perceived organizational support (POS) and employees’ core self-evaluations (CSE) in the relationship between supervisors’ transformational leadership and job engagement. In order to test the proposed model, a structural equation modelling was performed using the bootstrapping technique in IBM SPSS Amos 23 for Windows. The sample consisted of 320 employees from emergent high-tech and knowledge-based SMEs in Spain. The results supported all the hypotheses posited. By helping employees to find the meaning and significance of their work, making them feel supported by the organization and strengthening their sense of worth and competence, transformational leaders boost job engagement, a key aspect of the human dimension of organizational sustainability. This paper contributes to the psychology of sustainability by advancing knowledge of the mechanisms through which supervisors’ transformational leadership influences employees’ well-being in terms of job engagement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Managerial Humanistic Attention and CSR: Do Firm Characteristics Matter?
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 4029; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10114029
Received: 7 October 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 31 October 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
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Abstract
This study attempted to investigate the influence of managerial humanistic attention on corporate social responsibility. Drawing upon humanistic value, upper echelons theory and behavior decision theory, we developed and tested hypotheses using secondary from manufacturing firms listed at Shanghai Stock Exchange from year [...] Read more.
This study attempted to investigate the influence of managerial humanistic attention on corporate social responsibility. Drawing upon humanistic value, upper echelons theory and behavior decision theory, we developed and tested hypotheses using secondary from manufacturing firms listed at Shanghai Stock Exchange from year 2010 to year 2014. This study showed that managerial humanistic attention can positively affect corporate social responsibility and corporate social responsibility was found to be influenced by firm characteristics. Specifically, the relationship between managerial humanistic attention and corporate social responsibility was stronger: when a firm was older; was bigger; and had more slack resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle The Valencia Eustress-Distress Appraisal Scale (VEDAS): Validation of the Italian Version
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3903; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113903
Received: 10 September 2018 / Revised: 23 October 2018 / Accepted: 24 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this study is to validate the Italian version of the Valencia Eustress-Distress Appraisal Scale (VEDAS). Two hundred and thirty-two Italian workers were involved in the study. Dimensionality, reliability, and concurrent validity were analyzed. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four-dimensional structure. [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to validate the Italian version of the Valencia Eustress-Distress Appraisal Scale (VEDAS). Two hundred and thirty-two Italian workers were involved in the study. Dimensionality, reliability, and concurrent validity were analyzed. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four-dimensional structure. In addition, the Italian version of the scale showed good internal consistency and validity. The results indicate that the Italian version of the VEDAS is a valid instrument for measuring eustress and distress appraisal in the Italian context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Antecedent and Consequences of Psychological Capital of Entrepreneurs
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3717; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103717
Received: 21 September 2018 / Revised: 7 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 October 2018 / Published: 16 October 2018
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Abstract
Psychological capital is critical for entrepreneurial resilience and sustainability. The purpose of this study is to examine a comprehensive model of the relationships between the antecedents and consequences of the psychological capital of entrepreneurs. A data sample of 208 entrepreneurs from the Philippines [...] Read more.
Psychological capital is critical for entrepreneurial resilience and sustainability. The purpose of this study is to examine a comprehensive model of the relationships between the antecedents and consequences of the psychological capital of entrepreneurs. A data sample of 208 entrepreneurs from the Philippines was analyzed with Structural Equation Modeling. The results found that organizational climate, organizational justice, leader-member exchange, authentic leadership have significant and positive influences on psychological capital, while occupational stressor is significantly associated with psychological capital. Among them, authentic leadership has the strongest impact on psychological capital. Results also found that psychological capital has significant and positive influences on entrepreneurs’ job satisfaction, performance, attitude, organizational citizenship behavior, while it also has negative influences on undesirable behavior. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Psychological Capital Research: A Meta-Analysis and Implications for Management Sustainability
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3457; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103457
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 11 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 28 September 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of this study is to conduct a wide-ranging meta-analytic review of empirical psychological capital studies in the management field. We conducted a meta-analysis on papers collected from the EBSCOhost and ProQuest databases. For comprehensive and extensive literature coverage, we also searched [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to conduct a wide-ranging meta-analytic review of empirical psychological capital studies in the management field. We conducted a meta-analysis on papers collected from the EBSCOhost and ProQuest databases. For comprehensive and extensive literature coverage, we also searched and compared the Journal Citation Report for the journals that referenced the most-cited articles (e.g., Journal of Organizational Behavior, Academy of Management Journal, etc.). A total of 81 published types of research were thoroughly selected and analyzed. The results revealed that, with different weighting, the following influencing factors have significant associations with psychological capital: organizational climate, organizational justice, authentic leadership, leader–member exchange, and occupational stress. Also, with different influencing weighting, psychological capital is confirmed to have impacts on job satisfaction, attitude, performance, organizational citizenship behavior, and undesirable behaviors. Implications for managerial sustainability are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Sustainability in Organizations: Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility and Spanish Employees’ Attitudes and Behaviors
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3423; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103423
Received: 19 August 2018 / Revised: 20 September 2018 / Accepted: 23 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
The fields of psychology of sustainability and sustainable development have been recently highlighted by their contributions to employee’s wellbeing in organizations. The present study is aimed to empirically explore the relationship between perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility of IBEX 35 (Spanish Exchange Index) [...] Read more.
The fields of psychology of sustainability and sustainable development have been recently highlighted by their contributions to employee’s wellbeing in organizations. The present study is aimed to empirically explore the relationship between perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility of IBEX 35 (Spanish Exchange Index) companies’ employees, and their attitudes and behaviors. The relationship between the employees’ perception of Corporate Social Responsibility of the IBEX 35 companies with their job satisfaction and Organizational citizenships behaviors is empirically analyzed. The sample includes 600 employees of the IBEX 35 companies. The results supported that the three dimensions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) perceived by the workers are different from each other, and that they are related positively, and significantly, with their job satisfaction, the Organizational Citizenships Behaviors oriented to the company and to other co-workers. We found that two dimensions of perceived CSR—sustainable economic development, and environmental protection—have a greater impact, whereas the CSR of social equity has an almost null explanatory power, compared to the other two dimensions. The study contributions will link the Firms’ CSR activities with the degree of wellbeing of employees: Relationships that become essential when designing companies’ products and/or services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Personality Traits and Positive Resources of Workers for Sustainable Development: Is Emotional Intelligence a Mediator for Optimism and Hope?
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3422; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103422
Received: 1 August 2018 / Revised: 3 September 2018 / Accepted: 4 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
The 21st century is characterized by unpredictable and changing environments that require individuals and organizations to adapt to these challenges and prepare for continuous transitions in the work environment. Optimism and hope are positive resources that are key factors in navigating this post-modern [...] Read more.
The 21st century is characterized by unpredictable and changing environments that require individuals and organizations to adapt to these challenges and prepare for continuous transitions in the work environment. Optimism and hope are positive resources that are key factors in navigating this post-modern work scenario. Emotional intelligence can be considered as another important variable in this context and furthermore, research has shown it can be increased through specific training. The aim of the present study is to examine the contribution of emotional intelligence in mediating the relationship between personality traits and both optimism and hope. The Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ), the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue-SF), the Life Orientation Test Revised (LOT-R), and the Hope Scale (HS) were administered to 201 Italian workers. Correlations among variables were calculated and mediation analyses were performed. The results showed that the relationships between personality traits and both optimism and hope are mediated by emotional intelligence. In particular, the contribution of emotional stability, agreeableness, and extraversion on optimism was mediated by emotional intelligence; the contribution of extraversion, emotional stability, and conscientiousness on hope was mediated by emotional intelligence. These results open new possibilities for research and interventions to enhance the personal resources of workers in the fluid scenario of the 21st century by promoting optimism and hope that are facilitated by emotional intelligence in the perspective of enhancing psychological aspects of sustainability and sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainable and Healthy Organizations Promote Employee Well-Being: The Moderating Role of Selection, Optimization, and Compensation Strategies
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3411; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103411
Received: 25 July 2018 / Revised: 20 September 2018 / Accepted: 22 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
The psychology of sustainability claims for a new kind of organization that promotes employee well-being as well as the search firm’s performance. In sustainable and healthy organizations, tasks are characterized by their significance, variety, autonomy, and feedback from the job. This way of [...] Read more.
The psychology of sustainability claims for a new kind of organization that promotes employee well-being as well as the search firm’s performance. In sustainable and healthy organizations, tasks are characterized by their significance, variety, autonomy, and feedback from the job. This way of organizing employees’ activities motivates them and can affect their well-being. However, due to a series of age-related physical and cognitive changes, older workers must constantly adapt to task demands to continue working and maintain their productivity. This research explores the moderating role of selection, optimization, and compensation strategies in the relationship between task characteristics (significance, variety, autonomy, and feedback from the job) on the one hand, and job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behaviors on the other. This study was carried out using a lagged design over a three-month interval. Participants were 183 Spanish workers aged between 45–55 years who completed two questionnaires (Time 1 and Time 2). The results support the moderating role of the optimization and compensation in the relationship between task characteristics and employee well-being. Elective selection and loss-based selection strategies do not moderate the relationship. These findings underscore that people who are actively involved in optimization and compensation strategies can age successfully at work. The implications of this study to improve the orientation practices of older workers are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle The Impact of Consumers’ Attitudes toward a Theme Park: A Focus on Disneyland in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3409; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103409
Received: 2 September 2018 / Revised: 21 September 2018 / Accepted: 22 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
We explore the impact of consumers’ attitude toward a theme park on the image of the host city. We study how attitudinal aspects of Disneyland in Los Angeles can influence the image of Los Angeles. Using the tripartite approach of attitudes, we model [...] Read more.
We explore the impact of consumers’ attitude toward a theme park on the image of the host city. We study how attitudinal aspects of Disneyland in Los Angeles can influence the image of Los Angeles. Using the tripartite approach of attitudes, we model consumers’ attitude of theme parks with three dimensions: cognition, affect, and conation. We show the causal relationships among Disney content, attitudinal constructs, and attitudes toward Los Angeles. Results showed that Disney content influenced cognition, affect, and conation, and both cognition and affect were connected to conation. Finally, affect influenced attitudes toward Los Angeles. Our research provides several implications for both academia and practitioners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Psychometric Properties of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Form Y) among Malaysian University Students
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3311; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093311
Received: 10 August 2018 / Revised: 6 September 2018 / Accepted: 10 September 2018 / Published: 17 September 2018
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Abstract
Health Ministry statistics showed mental health problems among Malaysian students increased from one in ten individuals in year 2011 to one in five in 2016. Anxiety and depression were cited as the main causes of mental health problems among students in Malaysia. However, [...] Read more.
Health Ministry statistics showed mental health problems among Malaysian students increased from one in ten individuals in year 2011 to one in five in 2016. Anxiety and depression were cited as the main causes of mental health problems among students in Malaysia. However, an anxiety measure that has been validated for use with Malaysian students is still lacking. Thus, the main objective of the current study is to examine the psychometric proprieties of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Form Y) (STAI), and to assess the suitability of the factorial model in the context of Malaysia. The STAI contains separate scales for measuring state and trait anxiety. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was conducted to test and to compare the two-factor model (State Anxiety and Trait Anxiety) and the four-factor model (State Anxiety Present, State Anxiety Absent, Trait Anxiety Present, and Trait Anxiety Absent) of STAI. In addition, the reliability and validity of the model were also tested. The sample consisted of 341 university students from one of the universities in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. The results supported a better fit to the data for the four-factor model of STAI. To improve composite reliability and the average variance extracted (AVE) of the constructs, one item was removed from each of the State Anxiety Present factor, Trait Anxiety present factor, and Trait Anxiety Absent factor. Convergent validity for the four-factor model was also improved by the removal of the three items. The findings also suggested that the STAI may have some discriminant validity issues. In the framework of psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, research and intervention regarding this topic should also be enhanced from a primary prevention perspective to improve the quality of life of every human being, fostering wellbeing at all different levels, from individuals to organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Intrapreneurial Self-Capital: A Key Resource for Promoting Well-Being in a Shifting Work Landscape
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3035; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093035
Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 22 August 2018 / Accepted: 25 August 2018 / Published: 27 August 2018
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Abstract
Intrapreneurial Self-Capital (ISC) represents a promising individual resource that might be enhanced through intervention to help individuals cope adaptively with the ongoing changes that characterize the world of work and other life challenges in the 21st century. In order to examine the promise [...] Read more.
Intrapreneurial Self-Capital (ISC) represents a promising individual resource that might be enhanced through intervention to help individuals cope adaptively with the ongoing changes that characterize the world of work and other life challenges in the 21st century. In order to examine the promise of this construct, the present study analyzed the relationship between ISC and both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, controlling for the effects of personality traits, which are substantially stable and not amenable to psychological intervention. The Intrapreneurial Self-Capital Scale (ISCS), the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ), the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), the Meaning in Life Measure (MLM), and the Flourishing Scale (FS), were administered to 563 Italian university students. Hierarchical regressions analyses showed that ISC explained a percentage of incremental variance beyond that accounted for by personality traits in relation to both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. These results support the premise that ISC may be a promising resource for fostering both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Aesthetic Experience Anchors Ego Identity Formation
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2596; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082596
Received: 7 April 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
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Abstract
The development of a coherent identity status, also referred to as ego identity, is critical during adolescence and early-adulthood. In the long run, an individual’s ego identity status may influence the sustainability of his or her well-being. Researchers have attempted to discover the [...] Read more.
The development of a coherent identity status, also referred to as ego identity, is critical during adolescence and early-adulthood. In the long run, an individual’s ego identity status may influence the sustainability of his or her well-being. Researchers have attempted to discover the predictors or factors correlated with one’s identity status. In that search, aesthetic experience, as a unique means of knowing oneself and the world, seemed to be overlooked. Philosophical and psychological discourses have asserted that aesthetic experience stimulated identity discovery and formation; this hypothesis, however, is not supported by strong quantitative evidence. Thus, an empirical study with a quantitative approach was conducted to examine whether those who have frequent aesthetic experiences are more likely to possess a mature ego identity. A sample of 758 valid questionnaires was collected. The results supported the argument that aesthetic experience favors the development of ego identity. In addition, this study revealed that sociodemographic backgrounds such as women, fine arts and design majors, and religious individuals were more likely to have a rich aesthetic life. The results imply that aesthetic experience serves as a crucial aspect that contributes to the wellness of personality development and promotes a healthy and sustainable quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Enhancing Substainability: Psychological Capital, Perceived Employability, and Job Insecurity in Different Work Contract Conditions
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2475; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072475
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 12 July 2018 / Published: 15 July 2018
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Abstract
According to the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, even though there are numerous challenges within the current labor market, it is possible to establish meaningful lives and meaningful work experiences through optimizing the use of personal resources and regenerating them. In line [...] Read more.
According to the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, even though there are numerous challenges within the current labor market, it is possible to establish meaningful lives and meaningful work experiences through optimizing the use of personal resources and regenerating them. In line with this assumption, the present study aims to test the moderation effect of the type of worker contracts on the relationship between psychological capital, perceived employability, and job insecurity. Participants were N = 190 Italian young workers (self-employed, permanent employees, or temporary employees). Results showed that perceived employability mediated the relationship between psychological capital and job insecurity, and that this relationship was moderated by the workers’ type of contract. Specifically, a higher level of psychological capital corresponded to a higher perception of employability, and consequently a lower job insecurity for temporary and self-employed workers, but not for permanent ones. These findings are in line with the assumptions of the psychology of sustainability, and encourage preventive interventions aimed to foster personal resources in order to reduce job insecurity, especially in cases of non-standard employment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Human Capital Sustainability Leadership to Promote Sustainable Development and Healthy Organizations: A New Scale
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2413; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072413
Received: 18 June 2018 / Revised: 6 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 July 2018 / Published: 11 July 2018
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Abstract
Human resource management that aims to promote employee wellbeing calls for a new style of leadership. Such a strategy focuses on fostering flourishing and resilient workers to build up thriving businesses and robust and sustainable organizations. In this framework, we developed a new [...] Read more.
Human resource management that aims to promote employee wellbeing calls for a new style of leadership. Such a strategy focuses on fostering flourishing and resilient workers to build up thriving businesses and robust and sustainable organizations. In this framework, we developed a new integrated construct of human capital sustainability leadership, and a scale to assess it. This leadership style has its roots in the existing definition of the term but aims to achieve higher integration of different functions and of the four dimensions of leadership, including ethical, sustainable, mindful and servant leadership. In this study, we analyze the psychometric properties of the new scale for assessing human capital sustainability leadership for Italian workers. The results of the exploratory factor analysis reveal a factor structure with the four dimensions that have good reliability and validity. The confirmatory factor analysis confirms this four-dimensional structure, which is integrated into the construct of human capital sustainability leadership as a single second-order factor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessArticle Job Loss in a Group of Older Canadian Workers: Challenges in the Sustainable Labour Market Reintegration Process
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2245; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072245
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 25 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
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Abstract
In Western countries, the loss of jobs among older workers is a highly worrisome situation, since it can be synonymous with long-term employment precariousness and definitive exclusion from the labour market. This precariousness is occurring while the labour force in these countries is [...] Read more.
In Western countries, the loss of jobs among older workers is a highly worrisome situation, since it can be synonymous with long-term employment precariousness and definitive exclusion from the labour market. This precariousness is occurring while the labour force in these countries is aging, and governments are looking to extend people’s working lives. It is therefore particularly relevant to study different labour market reintegration processes and to understand their sustainability from a psychological perspective. The present article is examining these processes using a longitudinal study over an 18-month period with 61 older Canadian workers. Time 1 and Final Time were documented with semi-structured individual interviews. These data allowed us to qualitatively construct three reintegration processes (blocked, downgrading, and sustainable) that describe a large spectrum of workers’ experiences regarding occupational repositioning. Quantitative analyses likewise suggest moderate statistical links between the reintegration process and changes in subjective variables associated with the relationship to work and identity representations. Altogether, the results underline the importance of returning to the labour market in qualified, decent, sustainable work that allows people to have a decent and meaningful personal life. The results also suggest, in keeping with the psychology of sustainability, that interventions should promote occupational and personal enrichment, both at the individual and organizational levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Academic Relational Civility as a Key Resource for Sustaining Well-Being
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1914; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061914
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 7 June 2018
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Abstract
In the 21st century, which has been characterized by complexity, instability, and continuous change, the well-being of individuals is threatened. The health and well-being of individuals are recognized as one of the 17 sustainable development goals of the United Nations. From a primary [...] Read more.
In the 21st century, which has been characterized by complexity, instability, and continuous change, the well-being of individuals is threatened. The health and well-being of individuals are recognized as one of the 17 sustainable development goals of the United Nations. From a primary prevention perspective, physical and psychological health can be augmented through the early identification and promotion of key psychological resources that sustain well-being across one’s lifetime. With that goal in mind, the present study explored potential relationships between academic relational civility and both hedonic (positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction) and eudaimonic well-being (meaning in life and flourishing), controlling for the effect of personality traits among university students. The Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ), the Academic Relational Civility Scale (ARCS), the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), the Meaning in Life Measure (MLM), and the Flourishing Scale (FS), were administered to 241 Italian university students. Regression analyses identified that academic relational civility contributed significantly to hedonic and eudaimonic well-being beyond the contribution of stable personality factors. Academic relational civility may represent one psychological resource for supporting and sustaining hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, suggesting the need for further research and intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle Seeking Control in a Precarious Environment: Sustainable Practices as an Adaptive Strategy to Living under Uncertainty
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1320; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051320
Received: 27 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 22 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
Our societies and our economies are struggling to transform in response to the climate crisis with the speed and intent that the rapidly deteriorating environmental situation requires. Resistance to change is invoked as one of the reasons for the slow adoption of new [...] Read more.
Our societies and our economies are struggling to transform in response to the climate crisis with the speed and intent that the rapidly deteriorating environmental situation requires. Resistance to change is invoked as one of the reasons for the slow adoption of new sustainable practices. In this paper, we argue that the transition to sustainable behaviors is part of a wider adaptation to the new uncertain and precarious conditions of contemporary living and this constitutes a unique opportunity for rapid cultural change. The analysis of a growing innovation space that is at the crossroads of digital transformation and ecological transition shows that the digital culture of sustainability actually goes hand in hand with the changing practices emerging from an increasing economic and professional precariousness. Since the invention of the world wide web, we have seen that digital innovation is an accelerator of cultural change. When applied to the ecological transition, will digital innovation create the conditions for an equally rapid and profound transformation of practices? To start exploring this question, we built a dedicated research tool called If You Want To that collected several thousand digital environmental projects. Our initial findings suggest that this wide landscape of services enables new sustainable forms of exchange, collaboration, consumption, and production, giving rise to alternative social, environmental, and economic models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)

Review

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Open AccessReview Sustainability within Fashion Business Models: A Systematic Literature Review
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2233; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082233
Received: 12 February 2019 / Revised: 28 March 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 13 April 2019
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Abstract
Production, marketing, and consumption of fashion products result in negative environmental impacts due to the massive production volume of fashion items. However, there is limited literature on how the fashion industry integrates sustainability-related practices into business models, how sustainability is measured within the [...] Read more.
Production, marketing, and consumption of fashion products result in negative environmental impacts due to the massive production volume of fashion items. However, there is limited literature on how the fashion industry integrates sustainability-related practices into business models, how sustainability is measured within the business models, or what drives the sustainability-emphasis of the fashion industry. Therefore, it is consequential to conduct a systematic review of the existing literature concerning how the fashion industry integrates sustainability into business models, if and how sustainability-related practices are measured to ensure transparency and lead to improvements, and to recognize what drives sustainability in fashion business models. The key aspects regarding sustainability integration into business models include organization values, entrepreneurship, innovation, and internationalization processes. With regards to measurement of impacts and reporting, it is evident that Corporate Social Responsibility, the Global Reporting Initiative, and the Apparel and Footwear Sector Supplement are of relevance for the industry, mainly with regards to the supply chain. The drivers influencing sustainability practices are government and regulatory pressure, market pressure, closed-loop pressure, value creation, innovation, equity, authenticity, functionality, localism, and exclusivity. The findings are of relevance both for academia and the fashion industry, as the paper provides evidence on what has already been studied by academia, but also highlights a need for further studies on the fashion industry with regards to sustainability practices. This paper; therefore, opens a path for academics to consider empirical studies on how to investigate the sustainability strategies of fashion businesses, elements of fashion business models, driving forces influencing actions, measurements, key performance indicators, transparency, and disclosure, just to name a few examples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessReview Migrant Workers and Physical Health: An Umbrella Review
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010232
Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 24 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
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Abstract
Migrants are mainly employed in “3D jobs” which are dirty, dangerous, and difficult, are characterized by monotony and intense rhythms, and are found in sectors with higher risks such as construction, heavy industry, and agriculture. The aim of this study is to construct [...] Read more.
Migrants are mainly employed in “3D jobs” which are dirty, dangerous, and difficult, are characterized by monotony and intense rhythms, and are found in sectors with higher risks such as construction, heavy industry, and agriculture. The aim of this study is to construct a systematic review in order to identify the main occupational risks and occupational diseases of this category. Research included articles published from 2013 to 2018 on major online databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Scopus), which were obtained using a combination of keywords (migrant workers, expatriates, physical health, diseases, illnesses, travel, travelers, work, and occupational medicine). The online search included 1109 references. We excluded 977 studies because they were unrelated to physical health and another 64 due to duplication. There were 68 articles which were analyzed, including six reviews and 62 original articles. The main risks which emerged are developing infectious diseases, metabolic cardiovascular diseases and manifesting a lower quality of life, in particular due to difficulties in accessing local health services. It will be crucial to implement the role of occupational medicine in order to introduce multilevel interventions designed to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses, and to promote healthier working environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper Improving Sustainability in Architectural Research: Biopsychosocial Requirements in the Design of Urban Spaces
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1585; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061585
Received: 6 December 2018 / Revised: 17 February 2019 / Accepted: 4 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
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Abstract
There is an ever increasing interest in identifying the links between architecture and public health and in how urban design can positively influence the latter. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development represents an innovative research area as a recent contribution to sustainability [...] Read more.
There is an ever increasing interest in identifying the links between architecture and public health and in how urban design can positively influence the latter. The psychology of sustainability and sustainable development represents an innovative research area as a recent contribution to sustainability science and its trans-disciplinary configuration. The research topic deals with the importance and the centrality of the user-centered approach in the observation of the relationships among mankind, technological systems, and built environments, for projects that guarantee the conditions of physical, mental, and social well-being. Starting from the plurality of different disciplinary sectors, from anthropometry and sociology to psychology, “human experience” and user’s expectations are explored, understood, and systematized. The analysis of the relationship between health and urban design has allowed researchers to identify design strategies to improve the level of urban livability. The city of Pisa is the case study; mobility within the city is redefined through various levels of the use of space so that paths and areas of inclusion and socialization are re-valued, while new scenarios for some urban spaces open up. In this perspective, the design strategies synthetically follow two main directions: the re-appropriation of these places by the citizens and, at the same time, the promotion of their well-being from both a physical and psychological point of view. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Open AccessPerspective The Psychology of Harmony and Harmonization: Advancing the Perspectives for the Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4726; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124726
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 5 December 2018 / Accepted: 6 December 2018 / Published: 11 December 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (242 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
After delineating the roots of harmony in the literature from both the Eastern and the Western perspectives, the paper introduces the new Psychology of harmony in terms of harmonization that widens the perspective calling for psychological contributions regarding components, processes and building strengths [...] Read more.
After delineating the roots of harmony in the literature from both the Eastern and the Western perspectives, the paper introduces the new Psychology of harmony in terms of harmonization that widens the perspective calling for psychological contributions regarding components, processes and building strengths in a preventive perspective. The complex construction of Harmony from a psychological perspective underlines the concept of relationality. Harmony results at three main points, with oneself, with others, and with nature/the natural world, also taking into account the spatial and temporal perspectives. The Psychology of harmony as harmonization represents a pillar for a new research area in the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, considering harmonization in geographical and temporal perspectives, including meaningful construction processes from the past, to the present, and into the future using reflexivity processes at the individual, group, community, social, and national levels. Introducing the innovative psychology of harmony as harmonization the present article offers promising perspectives for research and intervention with the aim to individuate and foster new strengths from a preventive perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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