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Job Loss in a Group of Older Canadian Workers: Challenges in the Sustainable Labour Market Reintegration Process

1
Département des Fondements et Pratiques en Éducation, Centre de Recherche sur l’Intervention Et la Vie Au Travail (CRIEVAT), Faculté des Sciences de l’Éducation, Laval University, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Institute of Psychology, Research Center in Vocational Psychology and Career Counseling (CePCO), University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2245; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072245
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 25 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Abstract

In Western countries, the loss of jobs among older workers is a highly worrisome situation, since it can be synonymous with long-term employment precariousness and definitive exclusion from the labour market. This precariousness is occurring while the labour force in these countries is aging, and governments are looking to extend people’s working lives. It is therefore particularly relevant to study different labour market reintegration processes and to understand their sustainability from a psychological perspective. The present article is examining these processes using a longitudinal study over an 18-month period with 61 older Canadian workers. Time 1 and Final Time were documented with semi-structured individual interviews. These data allowed us to qualitatively construct three reintegration processes (blocked, downgrading, and sustainable) that describe a large spectrum of workers’ experiences regarding occupational repositioning. Quantitative analyses likewise suggest moderate statistical links between the reintegration process and changes in subjective variables associated with the relationship to work and identity representations. Altogether, the results underline the importance of returning to the labour market in qualified, decent, sustainable work that allows people to have a decent and meaningful personal life. The results also suggest, in keeping with the psychology of sustainability, that interventions should promote occupational and personal enrichment, both at the individual and organizational levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: psychology of sustainability and sustainable development; sustainable career; decent work; positive career outcomes; unemployment; older workers; labour market reintegration; relationship to work; identity representations psychology of sustainability and sustainable development; sustainable career; decent work; positive career outcomes; unemployment; older workers; labour market reintegration; relationship to work; identity representations
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Fournier, G.; Zimmermann, H.; Masdonati, J.; Gauthier, C. Job Loss in a Group of Older Canadian Workers: Challenges in the Sustainable Labour Market Reintegration Process. Sustainability 2018, 10, 2245.

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