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Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2299; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082299

Relationship between Ability-Based Emotional Intelligence, Cognitive Intelligence, and Job Performance

1
Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8529, Japan
2
School of Business Administration, University of Economics and Business—Vietnam National University, Hanoi 10000, Vietnam
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 6 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Abstract

Based on previous findings, which found that the three facets of ability-based emotional intelligence (EI) have varying effects on job performance, this study investigates the relationship between emotional intelligence, cognitive intelligence (CI), and job performance. The use of a cascade model suggests a progressive pattern, starting from emotion perception, followed by emotional understanding and emotion regulation, with downstream effects on job performance. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of both measurements, we employed the performance-based ability measurement, the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the self-reporting ability EI measurement, Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS). Our findings supported the cascade model, but in the case of WLEIS measures, both self-emotion appraisal and others’ emotion appraisal precede emotion regulation, leading to a positive effect on job performance. Moreover, CI moderated the relationship between EI and job performance, such that a decline in CI rendered the relationship more positive. The MSCEIT and WLEIS showed similar results, thus supporting the cascading model and moderating effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: cascading model; cognitive intelligence; compensatory model; emotional intelligence; emotional intelligence measurement cascading model; cognitive intelligence; compensatory model; emotional intelligence; emotional intelligence measurement
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Nguyen, N.N.; Nham, P.T.; Takahashi, Y. Relationship between Ability-Based Emotional Intelligence, Cognitive Intelligence, and Job Performance. Sustainability 2019, 11, 2299.

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