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Open AccessArticle

Burnout Precursors in Oncology Nurses: A Preliminary Cross-Sectional Study with a Systemic Organizational Analysis

1
Nursing Research Centre, Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale and Research and Development Unit of Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland (IOSI), 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland
2
Department of Business Economics, Health and Social Care, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland, 6928 Manno, Switzerland
3
Department of Psychology, EngageMinds Hub—Consumer & Health Research Center, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 20123 Milan, Italy
4
Health Professions Research and Developement Unit, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, 20100 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1246; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051246
Received: 25 January 2019 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
Burnout negatively affects nurses’ health and performance. Healthcare managers have an ethical duty to create healthy organizations that reduce burnout, especially within critical settings such as oncology. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to measure the presence of nurses’ burnout to formulate organizational strategies to prevent the syndrome onset, and (2) to evaluate the effect of recent organizational changes on the burnout phenomenon. A descriptive, cross-sectional design supported by a systemic organizational analysis was conducted in a Swiss Oncology Institute in 2013. Of 103 nurses working in the Institute, 52 (51.4%) completed the Burnout Potential Inventory (BPI) questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Burnout risk levels were low to moderate. Only 2 nurses out of the 52 showed moderate burnout risk levels. Inpatient nurses showed a higher risk of burnout than outpatient nurses, particularly due to ambiguity and feelings of powerlessness. Nurses with post-basic education showed a higher risk when considering poor teamwork values and ambiguity in the workplace. Poor middle-management was found to negatively influence worker wellbeing. The working environment set by management resulted in low burnout risk levels. Managers must carefully select middle-management because inappropriate leadership might promote the onset of burnout. View Full-Text
Keywords: burnout; oncology nursing; leadership; nurse wellbeing; healthy organizations; sustainable work; patient engagement burnout; oncology nursing; leadership; nurse wellbeing; healthy organizations; sustainable work; patient engagement
MDPI and ACS Style

Bonetti, L.; Tolotti, A.; Valcarenghi, D.; Pedrazzani, C.; Barello, S.; Ghizzardi, G.; Graffigna, G.; Sari, D.; Bianchi, M. Burnout Precursors in Oncology Nurses: A Preliminary Cross-Sectional Study with a Systemic Organizational Analysis. Sustainability 2019, 11, 1246.

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