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Examining Millennials’ Global Citizenship Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions to Engage in Environmental Volunteering

1
Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
2
Ekonomihögskolan, Linnéuniversitet, 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden
3
Institute of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Jagiellonian University, 30-387 Krakow, Poland
4
Mayborn School of Journalism, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2324; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082324
Received: 21 January 2019 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Abstract

Volunteering for nature conservation has become an important resource in solving local environmental problems of global importance. The study at hand assessed how well millennials’ global citizenship attitudes explain their behavioral intentions to engage in volunteer projects, as well as how prior experience of volunteering in environmental projects affects millennials’ global citizenship attitudes. Those who reported past participation in this type of volunteer experience were generally more inclined to partake in future environmental volunteering than those without prior experience. Likewise, for those with prior experience, global citizen factors played a greater role in intentions to experience environmental volunteering. This study makes valuable contributions to the literature surrounding nature conservation, as it illustrates that millennials’ global citizenship attitudes predict participation in environmental volunteering. This work concludes with insights concerning what programs (that provide millennials with opportunities to fulfill environmental duties associated with their global environmental citizenship) can do to provide a more valuable experience for young volunteers. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental volunteering; global citizenship attitudes; behavioral intentions; prior volunteer experience environmental volunteering; global citizenship attitudes; behavioral intentions; prior volunteer experience
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Woosnam, K.M.; Strzelecka, M.; Nisbett, G.S.; Keith, S.J. Examining Millennials’ Global Citizenship Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions to Engage in Environmental Volunteering. Sustainability 2019, 11, 2324.

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