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Cancers, Volume 10, Issue 2 (February 2018)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a very dense and highly organized tumor [...] Read more.
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Respiratory-Gated Proton Beam Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Adjacent to the Gastrointestinal Tract without Fiducial Markers
Received: 29 January 2018 / Revised: 16 February 2018 / Accepted: 19 February 2018 / Published: 21 February 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 893 | PDF Full-text (1663 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The efficacy of proton beam therapy (PBT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been reported, but insertion of fiducial markers in the liver is usually required. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of respiratory-gated PBT without fiducial markers for HCC located within 2 cm
[...] Read more.
The efficacy of proton beam therapy (PBT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been reported, but insertion of fiducial markers in the liver is usually required. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of respiratory-gated PBT without fiducial markers for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract. From March 2011 to December 2015 at our institution, 40 patients were evaluated (median age, 72 years; range, 38–87 years). All patients underwent PBT at a dose of 60 to 80 cobalt gray equivalents (CGE) in 20 to 38 fractions. The median follow-up period was 19.9 months (range, 1.2–72.3 months). The median tumor size was 36.5 mm (range, 11–124 mm). Kaplan–Meier estimates of the 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local tumor control rates were 76%, 60%, and 94%, respectively. One patient (2.5%) developed a grade 3 gastric ulcer and one (2.5%) developed grade 3 ascites retention; none of the remaining patients developed grade >3 toxicities (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.0.). This study indicates that PBT without fiducial markers achieves good local control without severe treatment-related toxicity of the gastrointestinal tract for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy)
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Open AccessReview Recommendations and Choices for BRCA Mutation Carriers at Risk for Ovarian Cancer: A Complicated Decision
Received: 7 December 2017 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 16 February 2018 / Published: 21 February 2018
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Abstract
Current ovarian cancer screening guidelines in high-risk women vary according to different organizations. Risk reducing surgery remains the gold standard for definitive treatment in BRCA mutation carriers, but research advancements have created more short-term options for patients to consider. The decisions involved in
[...] Read more.
Current ovarian cancer screening guidelines in high-risk women vary according to different organizations. Risk reducing surgery remains the gold standard for definitive treatment in BRCA mutation carriers, but research advancements have created more short-term options for patients to consider. The decisions involved in how a woman manages her BRCA mutation status can cause a great deal of stress and worry due to the imperfect therapy options. The goal of this review was to critically analyze the screening recommendations and alternative options for high-risk ovarian cancer patients and evaluate how these discrepancies and choices affect a woman’s management decisions. Full article
Open AccessReview Cancer Stem Cells, Bone and Tumor Microenvironment: Key Players in Bone Metastases
Received: 5 December 2017 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 17 February 2018 / Published: 20 February 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1161 | PDF Full-text (615 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tumor mass is constituted by a heterogeneous group of cells, among which a key role is played by the cancer stem cells (CSCs), possessing high regenerative properties. CSCs directly metastasize to bone, since bone microenvironment represents a fertile environment that protects CSCs against
[...] Read more.
Tumor mass is constituted by a heterogeneous group of cells, among which a key role is played by the cancer stem cells (CSCs), possessing high regenerative properties. CSCs directly metastasize to bone, since bone microenvironment represents a fertile environment that protects CSCs against the immune system, and maintains their properties and plasticity. CSCs can migrate from the primary tumor to the bone marrow (BM), due to their capacity to perform the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Once in BM, they can also perform the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, allowing them to proliferate and initiate bone lesions. Another factor explaining the osteotropism of CSCs is their ability to recognize chemokine gradients toward BM, through the CXCL12–CXCR4 axis, also known to be involved in tumor metastasis to other organs. Moreover, the expression of CXCR4 is associated with the maintenance of CSCs’ stemness, and CXCL12 expression by osteoblasts attracts CSCs to the BM niches. CSCs localize in the pre-metastatic niches, which are anatomically distinct regions within the tumor microenvironment and govern the metastatic progression. According to the stimuli received in the niches, CSCs can remain dormant for long time or outgrow from dormancy and create bone lesions. This review resumes different aspects of the CSCs’ bone metastastic process and discusses available treatments to target CSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeting Bone Metastasis in Cancer)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Towards a Clinical Decision Support System for External Beam Radiation Oncology Prostate Cancer Patients: Proton vs. Photon Radiotherapy? A Radiobiological Study of Robustness and Stability
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 19 January 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 18 February 2018
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Abstract
We present a methodology which can be utilized to select proton or photon radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients. Four state-of-the-art competing treatment modalities were compared (by way of an in silico trial) for a cohort of 25 prostate cancer patients, with and without
[...] Read more.
We present a methodology which can be utilized to select proton or photon radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients. Four state-of-the-art competing treatment modalities were compared (by way of an in silico trial) for a cohort of 25 prostate cancer patients, with and without correction strategies for prostate displacements. Metrics measured from clinical image guidance systems were used. Three correction strategies were investigated; no-correction, extended-no-action-limit, and online-correction. Clinical efficacy was estimated via radiobiological models incorporating robustness (how probable a given treatment plan was delivered) and stability (the consistency between the probable best and worst delivered treatments at the 95% confidence limit). The results obtained at the cohort level enabled the determination of a threshold for likely clinical benefit at the individual level. Depending on the imaging system and correction strategy; 24%, 32% and 44% of patients were identified as suitable candidates for proton therapy. For the constraints of this study: Intensity-modulated proton therapy with online-correction was on average the most effective modality. Irrespective of the imaging system, each treatment modality is similar in terms of robustness, with and without the correction strategies. Conversely, there is substantial variation in stability between the treatment modalities, which is greatly reduced by correction strategies. This study provides a ‘proof-of-concept’ methodology to enable the prospective identification of individual patients that will most likely (above a certain threshold) benefit from proton therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy)
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Open AccessReview Advanced EUS Guided Tissue Acquisition Methods for Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 8 December 2017 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 11 February 2018 / Published: 17 February 2018
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Abstract
Pancreas cancer is a lethal cancer as the majority patients are diagnosed at an advanced incurable stage. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities and management strategies, including surgery and chemotherapies, the outcome of pancreas cancer remains poor. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an important imaging
[...] Read more.
Pancreas cancer is a lethal cancer as the majority patients are diagnosed at an advanced incurable stage. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities and management strategies, including surgery and chemotherapies, the outcome of pancreas cancer remains poor. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an important imaging tool for pancreas cancer. For decades, resected pancreas cancer and other cancer specimens have been used to identify tissue biomarkers or genomics for precision therapy; however, only 20% of patients undergo surgery, and thus, this framework is not useful for unresectable pancreas cancer. With advancements in needle technologies, tumor specimens can be obtained at the time of tissue diagnosis. Tumor tissue can be used for development of personalized cancer treatment, such as performing whole exome sequencing and global genomic profiling of pancreas cancer, development of tissue biomarkers, and targeted mutational assays for precise chemotherapy treatment. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in tissue acquisition of pancreas cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
Open AccessArticle A Phase I/II Study Targeting Angiogenesis Using Bevacizumab Combined with Chemotherapy and a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor (Valproic Acid) in Advanced Sarcomas
Received: 1 January 2018 / Revised: 13 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 17 February 2018
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Abstract
Epigenetic events and genetic alterations under the control of the tumor microenvironment potentially mediate tumor induced angiogenesis involved in soft tissue sarcoma (STS) metastasis. Addition of antiangiogenic agent, such as bevacizumab, to standard chemotherapy in treatment of sarcoma has been studied in clinical
[...] Read more.
Epigenetic events and genetic alterations under the control of the tumor microenvironment potentially mediate tumor induced angiogenesis involved in soft tissue sarcoma (STS) metastasis. Addition of antiangiogenic agent, such as bevacizumab, to standard chemotherapy in treatment of sarcoma has been studied in clinical trials, but most of the findings have not supported its use. We hypothesized the existence of an epigenetically mediated “angiogenic switch”, and the tumor microenvironment, prevents bevacizumab from truly blocking angiogenesis. The addition of valproic acid (VPA), a weak histone deacetylase inhibitor, and bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, together with the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine and docetaxel, may enhance responses and alter chemoresistance. This was designed as a phase I/II trial with primary endpoints including safety of the treatment combination and tumor response. Unresectable or metastatic sarcoma patients >18 years of age, irrespective of number of prior treatments, received VPA 40 mg/kg orally for 5 days prior to day 1, bevacizumab at 15 mg/kg IV on day 1, gemcitabine 900 mg/m2 (day 1, day 8), and docetaxel 75 mg/m2 (day 8). Cycles were of 28 day duration. Bevacizumab and VPA were continued as maintenance after 6 cycles, until disease progression. A standard 3 + 3 phase I dose de-escalation design was utilized to evaluate safety. Gain of function p53 gene mutation testing was performed on available archival tissue specimens. A total of 46 patients (30 female, 16 male) with median age of 60 (range 24–81) years were enrolled; 34 (73.9%) patients received prior chemotherapy, 14 (30%) of which received prior gemcitabine and docetaxel. Patients received a median of 5.5 cycles (range 0–24 of treatment (min 0, one patient died prior to completing the first cycle; max: 24, one patient received 6 cycles and 18 maintenance cycles before progressing). Seventeen patients underwent dose reduction, of which VPA was reduced in 6 patients. Forty-one patients were evaluable for response. There was a confirmed complete response in 1 (epithelioid sarcoma), and a partial response (PR) in 6 (1 carcinosarcoma, 2 extrauterine leiomyosarcoma (LMS), 2 undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, and 1 uterine LMS) patients. Stable disease (SD) was seen in 21 patients for at least 2 months. One subject with prior gemcitabine and docetaxel had PR, and 7 had SD. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.7 months (95% CI: 2.1–8.0), and overall survival (OS) was 12.9 months (95% CI: 8.3–14.5). Three patients died due to tumor progression while on the study. The combination of VPA, bevacizumab, gemcitabine, and docetaxel appears to be moderately safe and well tolerated. Given that there are very limited options for patients with relapsed refractory STS, this drug combination may be an important therapy to consider. This combination treatment deserves further investigation in epithelioid and carcinosarcoma subtypes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetic Influence on Cancer Metastasis and/or Treatment Resistance)
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Open AccessEditorial The Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Cancer
Received: 11 February 2018 / Revised: 13 February 2018 / Accepted: 13 February 2018 / Published: 16 February 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 899 | PDF Full-text (163 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs during normal embryonic development, tissue regeneration, organ fibrosis, and wound healing.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) in Cancer)
Open AccessReview Next Generation Immunotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer: DNA Vaccination is Seeking New Combo Partners
Received: 15 January 2018 / Revised: 7 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 16 February 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1367 | PDF Full-text (1985 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) is an almost incurable radio- and chemo-resistant tumor, and its microenvironment is characterized by a strong desmoplastic reaction associated with a significant infiltration of T regulatory lymphocytes and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Tregs, MDSC). Investigating immunological targets has identified a
[...] Read more.
Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) is an almost incurable radio- and chemo-resistant tumor, and its microenvironment is characterized by a strong desmoplastic reaction associated with a significant infiltration of T regulatory lymphocytes and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Tregs, MDSC). Investigating immunological targets has identified a number of metabolic and cytoskeletal related molecules, which are typically recognized by circulating antibodies. Among these molecules we have investigated alpha-enolase (ENO1), a glycolytic enzyme that also acts a plasminogen receptor. ENO1 is also recognized by T cells in PDA patients, so we developed a DNA vaccine that targets ENO1. This efficiently induces many immunological processes (antibody formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC)-mediated tumor killing, infiltration of effector T cells, reduction of infiltration of myeloid and Treg suppressor cells), which significantly increase the survival of genetically engineered mice that spontaneously develop pancreatic cancer. Although promising, the ENO1 DNA vaccine does not completely eradicate the tumor, which, after an initial growth inhibition, returns to proliferate again, especially when Tregs and MDSC ensue in the tumor mass. This led us to develop possible strategies for combinatorial treatments aimed to broaden and sustain the antitumor immune response elicited by DNA vaccination. Based on the data we have obtained in recent years, this review will discuss the biological bases of possible combinatorial treatments (chemotherapy, PI3K inhibitors, tumor-associated macrophages, ENO1 inhibitors) that could be effective in amplifying the response induced by the immune vaccination in PDA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Alleviating Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Pain Using Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Neurolysis
Received: 14 January 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 15 February 2018
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Abstract
The most common symptom in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer is abdominal pain. This has traditionally been treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioid analgesics. However, these treatments result in inadequate pain control or drug-related adverse effects in some patients. An alternative pain-relief
[...] Read more.
The most common symptom in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer is abdominal pain. This has traditionally been treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioid analgesics. However, these treatments result in inadequate pain control or drug-related adverse effects in some patients. An alternative pain-relief modality is celiac plexus neurolysis, in which the celiac plexus is chemically ablated. This procedure was performed percutaneously or intraoperatively until 1996, when endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided celiac plexus neurolysis was first described. In this transgastric anterior approach, a neurolytic agent is injected around the celiac trunk under EUS guidance. The procedure gained popularity as a minimally invasive approach and is currently widely used to treat pancreatic cancer-associated pain. We focus on two relatively new techniques of EUS-guided neurolysis: EUS-guided celiac ganglia neurolysis and EUS-guided broad plexus neurolysis, which have been developed to improve efficacy. Although the techniques are safe and effective in general, some serious adverse events including ischemic and infectious complications have been reported as the procedure has gained widespread popularity. We summarize reported clinical outcomes of EUS-guided neurolysis in pancreatic cancer (from the PubMed and Embase databases) with a goal of providing information useful in developing strategies for pancreatic cancer-associated pain alleviation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Beyond Brooding on Oncometabolic Havoc in IDH-Mutant Gliomas and AML: Current and Future Therapeutic Strategies
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 3 February 2018 / Accepted: 6 February 2018 / Published: 11 February 2018
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Abstract
Isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1,2), the key Krebs cycle enzymes that generate NADPH reducing equivalents, undergo heterozygous mutations in >70% of low- to mid-grade gliomas and ~20% of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) and gain an unusual new activity of reducing the α-ketoglutarate
[...] Read more.
Isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1,2), the key Krebs cycle enzymes that generate NADPH reducing equivalents, undergo heterozygous mutations in >70% of low- to mid-grade gliomas and ~20% of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) and gain an unusual new activity of reducing the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in a NADPH-consuming reaction. The oncometabolite D-2HG, which accumulates >35 mM, is widely accepted to drive a progressive oncogenesis besides exacerbating the already increased oxidative stress in these cancers. More importantly, D-2HG competes with α-KG and inhibits a large number of α-KG-dependent dioxygenases such as TET (Ten-eleven translocation), JmjC domain-containing KDMs (histone lysine demethylases), and the ALKBH DNA repair proteins that ultimately lead to hypermethylation of the CpG islands in the genome. The resulting CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) accounts for major gene expression changes including the silencing of the MGMT (O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase) repair protein in gliomas. Glioma patients with IDH1 mutations also show better therapeutic responses and longer survival, the reasons for which are yet unclear. There has been a great surge in drug discovery for curtailing the mutant IDH activities, and arresting tumor proliferation; however, given the unique and chronic metabolic effects of D-2HG, the promise of these compounds for glioma treatment is uncertain. This comprehensive review discusses the biology, current drug design and opportunities for improved therapies through exploitable synthetic lethality pathways, and an intriguing oncometabolite-inspired strategy for primary glioblastoma. Full article
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Open AccessReview Early Diagnosis to Improve the Poor Prognosis of Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 1 January 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2018 / Accepted: 2 February 2018 / Published: 11 February 2018
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Abstract
Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a poor prognosis due to delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis is the most important factor for improving prognosis. For early diagnosis of PC, patients with clinical manifestations suggestive of PC and high risk for developing PC need to be selected
[...] Read more.
Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a poor prognosis due to delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis is the most important factor for improving prognosis. For early diagnosis of PC, patients with clinical manifestations suggestive of PC and high risk for developing PC need to be selected for examinations for PC. Signs suggestive of PC (e.g., symptoms, diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, or abnormal results of blood examinations) should not be missed, and the details of risks for PC (e.g., familial history of PC, intraductal mucin producing neoplasm, chronic pancreatitis, hereditary pancreatitis, or life habit) should be understood. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be performed for diagnosing PC, but the diagnostic ability of these examinations for PC is limited. Endoscopic diagnostic procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, including fine-needle aspiration, and endoscopic retrograde pancreatocholangiography, including Serial Pancreatic-juice Aspiration Cytologic Examination (SPACE), could be recommended for a detailed examination to diagnose pancreatic carcinoma earlier. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
Open AccessFeature PaperReview Bioapplications of Cell-SELEX-Generated Aptamers in Cancer Diagnostics, Therapeutics, Theranostics and Biomarker Discovery: A Comprehensive Review
Received: 17 December 2017 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1866 | PDF Full-text (6315 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Currently, functional single-stranded oligonucleotide probes, termed aptamers, generated by an iterative technology, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX), are utilized to selectively target molecules or cells with high affinity. Aptamers hold considerable promise as multifunctional molecules or conjugates for challenging nanotechnologies
[...] Read more.
Currently, functional single-stranded oligonucleotide probes, termed aptamers, generated by an iterative technology, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX), are utilized to selectively target molecules or cells with high affinity. Aptamers hold considerable promise as multifunctional molecules or conjugates for challenging nanotechnologies or bioapplications now and in the future. In this review, we first describe recent endeavors to select aptamers towards live cancer cells via cell-SELEX. We then introduce several characteristic applications of selected aptamers, especially in imaging, drug delivery and therapy. In part, these advances have been made possible via synthesis of aptamer-based nanomaterials, which, by their sizes, shapes, and physicochemical properties, allow such aptamer-nanomaterial complexes to function as signal reporters or drug carriers. We also describe how these aptamer-based molecular tools contribute to cancer biomarker discovery through high-affinity recognition of membrane protein receptors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamers: Promising Tools for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 1 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
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Abstract
Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the main important causes of cancer-related death and its mortality is increasingly worldwide. In Europe, alcohol abuse accounts for approximately half of all liver cancer cases and it will become the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in the
[...] Read more.
Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the main important causes of cancer-related death and its mortality is increasingly worldwide. In Europe, alcohol abuse accounts for approximately half of all liver cancer cases and it will become the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in the next future with the sharp decline of chronic viral hepatitis. The pathophysiology of alcohol-induced carcinogenesis involves acetaldehyde catabolism, oxidative stress and chronic liver inflammation. Genetic background plays also a significant role and specific patterns of gene mutations in alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma have been characterized. Survival is higher in patients who undergo specific surveillance programmes than in patients who do not. However, patients with alcohol cirrhosis present a significantly greater risk of liver decompensation than those with cirrhosis due to other aetiologies. Furthermore, the adherence to screening program can be suboptimal. Liver transplant for patients with Milan-in hepatocellular carcinoma represents the best possible treatment in case of tumour recurrence/progression despite loco-regional or surgical treatments. Long-term result after liver transplantation for alcohol related liver disease is good. However, cardiovascular disease and de novo malignancies can significantly hamper patients’ survival and should be carefully considered by transplant team. In this review, we have focused on the evolution of alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma epidemiology and risk factors as well as on liver transplantation in alcoholic patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Cancer)
Open AccessReview Linking Extracellular Matrix Agrin to the Hippo Pathway in Liver Cancer and Beyond
Received: 4 January 2018 / Revised: 5 February 2018 / Accepted: 5 February 2018 / Published: 6 February 2018
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Abstract
In addition to the structural and scaffolding role, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is emerging as a hub for biomechanical signal transduction that is frequently relayed to intracellular sensors to regulate diverse cellular processes. At a macroscopic scale, matrix rigidity confers long-ranging effects contributing
[...] Read more.
In addition to the structural and scaffolding role, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is emerging as a hub for biomechanical signal transduction that is frequently relayed to intracellular sensors to regulate diverse cellular processes. At a macroscopic scale, matrix rigidity confers long-ranging effects contributing towards tissue fibrosis and cancer. The transcriptional co-activators YAP/TAZ, better known as the converging effectors of the Hippo pathway, are widely recognized for their new role as nuclear mechanosensors during organ homeostasis and cancer. Still, how YAP/TAZ senses these “stiffness cues” from the ECM remains enigmatic. Here, we highlight the recent perspectives on the role of agrin in mechanosignaling from the ECM via antagonizing the Hippo pathway to activate YAP/TAZ in the contexts of cancer, neuromuscular junctions, and cardiac regeneration. Full article
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Open AccessReview Integrin Inhibitors in Prostate Cancer
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 6 February 2018
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Abstract
Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the third highest cause of cancer-related deaths in men in the U.S. The development of chemotherapeutic agents that can bind PCa tumor cells with high specificity is critical in order to increase treatment
[...] Read more.
Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the third highest cause of cancer-related deaths in men in the U.S. The development of chemotherapeutic agents that can bind PCa tumor cells with high specificity is critical in order to increase treatment effectiveness. Integrin receptors and their corresponding ligands have different expression patterns in PCa cells. They have been identified as promising targets to inhibit pathways involved in PCa progression. Currently, several compounds have proven to target specific integrins and their subunits in PCa cells. In this article, we review the role of integrins inhibitors in PCa and their potential as therapeutic targets for PCa treatments. We have discussed the following: natural compounds, monoclonal antibodies, statins, campothecins analog, aptamers, d-aminoacid, and snake venom. Recent studies have shown that their mechanisms of action result in decrease cell migration, cell invasion, cell proliferation, and metastasis of PCa cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrins in Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle Elevated Polyamines in Saliva of Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 26 January 2018 / Accepted: 2 February 2018 / Published: 5 February 2018
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Abstract
Detection of pancreatic cancer (PC) at a resectable stage is still difficult because of the lack of accurate detection tests. The development of accurate biomarkers in low or non-invasive biofluids is essential to enable frequent tests, which would help increase the opportunity of
[...] Read more.
Detection of pancreatic cancer (PC) at a resectable stage is still difficult because of the lack of accurate detection tests. The development of accurate biomarkers in low or non-invasive biofluids is essential to enable frequent tests, which would help increase the opportunity of PC detection in early stages. Polyamines have been reported as possible biomarkers in urine and saliva samples in various cancers. Here, we analyzed salivary metabolites, including polyamines, using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. Salivary samples were collected from patients with PC (n = 39), those with chronic pancreatitis (CP, n = 14), and controls (C, n = 26). Polyamines, such as spermine, N1-acetylspermidine, and N1-acetylspermine, showed a significant difference between patients with PC and those with C, and the combination of four metabolites including N1-acetylspermidine showed high accuracy in discriminating PC from the other two groups. These data show the potential of saliva as a source for tests screening for PC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle MYC Regulates α6 Integrin Subunit Expression and Splicing Under Its Pro-Proliferative ITGA6A Form in Colorectal Cancer Cells
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 29 January 2018 / Accepted: 31 January 2018 / Published: 3 February 2018
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Abstract
The α6 integrin subunit (ITGA6) pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing to form two splicing variants, named ITGA6A and ITGA6B. In primary human colorectal cancer cells, the levels of both ITGA6 and β4 integrin subunit (ITGB4) subunits of the α6β4 integrin are increased.
[...] Read more.
The α6 integrin subunit (ITGA6) pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing to form two splicing variants, named ITGA6A and ITGA6B. In primary human colorectal cancer cells, the levels of both ITGA6 and β4 integrin subunit (ITGB4) subunits of the α6β4 integrin are increased. We previously found that the upregulation of ITGA6 is a direct consequence of the increase of the pro-proliferative ITGA6A variant. However, the mechanisms that control ITGA6 expression and splicing into the ITGA6A variant over ITGA6B in colorectal cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the promoter activity of the ITGA6 gene is regulated by MYC. Pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity with the MYC inhibitor (MYCi) 10058-F4 or knockdown of MYC expression by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) both lead to a decrease in ITGA6 and ITGA6A levels in colorectal cancer cells, while overexpression of MYC enhances ITGA6 promoter activity. We also found that MYC inhibition decreases the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 2 (ESRP2) splicing factor at both the mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that the proximal promoter sequences of ITGA6 and ESRP2 were occupied by MYC and actively transcribed in colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, expression studies in primary colorectal tumors and corresponding resection margins confirmed that the up-regulation of the ITGA6A subunit can be correlated with the increase in MYC and ESRP2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the proto-oncogene MYC can regulate the promoter activation and splicing of the ITGA6 integrin gene through ESRP2 to favor the production of the pro-proliferative ITGA6A variant in colorectal cancer cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrins in Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle Phosphorylation of Sox2 at Threonine 116 is a Potential Marker to Identify a Subset of Breast Cancer Cells with High Tumorigenecity and Stem-Like Features
Received: 7 December 2017 / Revised: 17 January 2018 / Accepted: 30 January 2018 / Published: 3 February 2018
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Abstract
We have previously identified a novel phenotypic dichotomy in breast cancer (BC) based on the response to a SRR2 (Sox2 regulatory region 2) reporter, with reporter responsive (RR) cells being more tumorigenic/stem-like than reporter unresponsive (RU) cells. Since the expression level of Sox2
[...] Read more.
We have previously identified a novel phenotypic dichotomy in breast cancer (BC) based on the response to a SRR2 (Sox2 regulatory region 2) reporter, with reporter responsive (RR) cells being more tumorigenic/stem-like than reporter unresponsive (RU) cells. Since the expression level of Sox2 is comparable between the two cell subsets, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Sox2 contribute to their differential reporter response and phenotypic differences. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found Sox2 to be phosphorylated in RR but not RU cells. Threonine 116 is an important phosphorylation site, since transfection of the T116A mutant into RR cells significantly decreased the SRR2 reporter luciferase activity and the RR-associated phenotype. Oxidative stress-induced conversion of RU into RR cells was accompanied by Sox2 phosphorylation at T116 and increased Sox2-DNA binding. In a cohort of BC, we found significant correlations between the proportion of tumor cells immuno-reactive with anti-phosphorylated Sox2T116 and a high tumor grade (p = 0.006), vascular invasion (p = 0.001) and estrogen receptor expression (p = 0.032). In conclusion, our data suggests that phosphorylation of Sox2T116 contributes to the tumorigenic/stem-like features in RR cells. Detection of phospho-Sox2T116 may be useful in identifying a small subset of tumor cells carrying stem-like/tumorigenic features in BC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Biomarkers)
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Open AccessArticle Regulation of Cancer Stem Cell Metabolism by Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 4 (sFRP4)
Received: 22 November 2017 / Revised: 25 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
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Abstract
Tumours contain a small number of treatment-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs), and it is through these that tumour regrowth originates at secondary sites, thus rendering CSCs an attractive target for treatment. Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism for aggressive proliferation. Tumour cells use less
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Tumours contain a small number of treatment-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs), and it is through these that tumour regrowth originates at secondary sites, thus rendering CSCs an attractive target for treatment. Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism for aggressive proliferation. Tumour cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and increasing tumour mass, instead of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). CSCs show distinct metabolic shift and, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. Since Wnt signalling promotes glycolysis and tumour growth, we investigated the effect of the Wnt antagonist secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (sFRP4) on CSC metabolism. We demonstrate that sFRP4 has a prominent role in basal glucose uptake in CSCs derived from breast and prostate tumour cell lines. We show that sFRP4 treatment on CSCs isolated with variable glucose content induces metabolic reprogramming by relocating metabolic flux to glycolysis or OXPHOS. Altogether, sFRP4 treatment compromises cell proliferation and critically affects cell survival mechanisms such as viability, glucose transporters, pyruvate conversion, mammalian target of rapamycin, and induces CSC apoptosis under conditions of variable glucose content. Our findings provide the feasibility of using sFRP4 to inhibit CSC survival in order to induce metabolic reprogramming in vivo. Full article
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Open AccessReview Precision Immuno-Oncology: Prospects of Individualized Immunotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 23 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2491 | PDF Full-text (1244 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pancreatic cancer, most commonly referring to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), remains one of the most deadly diseases, with very few effective therapies available. Emerging as a new modality of modern cancer treatments, immunotherapy has shown promises for various cancer types. Over the past
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Pancreatic cancer, most commonly referring to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), remains one of the most deadly diseases, with very few effective therapies available. Emerging as a new modality of modern cancer treatments, immunotherapy has shown promises for various cancer types. Over the past decades, the potential of immunotherapy in eliciting clinical benefits in pancreatic cancer have also been extensively explored. It has been demonstrated in preclinical studies and early phase clinical trials that cancer vaccines were effective in eliciting anti-tumor immune response, but few have led to a significant improvement in survival. Despite the fact that immunotherapy with checkpoint blockade (e.g., anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 [CTLA-4] and anti-programmed cell death 1 [PD-1]/PD-L1 antibodies) has shown remarkable and durable responses in various cancer types, the application of checkpoint inhibitors in pancreatic cancer has been disappointing so far. It may, in part, due to the unique tumor microenvironment (TME) of pancreatic cancer, such as existence of excessive stromal matrix and hypovascularity, creating a TME of strong inhibitory signaling circuits and tremendous physical barriers for immune agent infiltration. This informs on the need for combination therapy approaches to engender a potent immune response that can translate to clinical benefits. On the other hand, lack of effective and validated biomarkers to stratify subgroup of patients who can benefit from immunotherapy poses further challenges for the realization of precision immune-oncology. Future studies addressing issues such as TME modulation, biomarker identification and therapeutic combination are warranted. In this review, advances in immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer were discussed and opportunities as well as challenges for personalized immune-oncology were addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Colorectal Cancer and Alcohol Consumption—Populations to Molecules
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2687 | PDF Full-text (1425 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, being the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the world. Several environmental and habitual factors have been associated with the CRC risk. Alcohol intake, a common and
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Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, being the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the world. Several environmental and habitual factors have been associated with the CRC risk. Alcohol intake, a common and rising habit of modern society, is one of the major risk factors for development of CRC. Here, we will summarize the evidence linking alcohol with colon carcinogenesis and possible underlying mechanisms. Some epidemiologic studies suggest that even moderate drinking increases the CRC risk. Metabolism of alcohol involves ethanol conversion to its metabolites that could exert carcinogenic effects in the colon. Production of ethanol metabolites can be affected by the colon microbiota, another recently recognized mediating factor to colon carcinogenesis. The generation of acetaldehyde and alcohol’s other metabolites leads to activation of cancer promoting cascades, such as DNA-adduct formation, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, epigenetic alterations, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and immune modulatory effects. Not only does alcohol induce its toxic effect through carcinogenic metabolites, but alcoholics themselves are predisposed to a poor diet, low in folate and fiber, and circadian disruption, which could further augment alcohol-induced colon carcinogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle Electrotransfer of Different Control Plasmids Elicits Different Antitumor Effectiveness in B16.F10 Melanoma
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 23 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1017 | PDF Full-text (2231 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Several studies have shown that different control plasmids may cause antitumor action in different murine tumor models after gene electrotransfer (GET). Due to the differences in GET protocols, plasmid vectors, and experimental models, the observed antitumor effects were incomparable. Therefore, the current study
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Several studies have shown that different control plasmids may cause antitumor action in different murine tumor models after gene electrotransfer (GET). Due to the differences in GET protocols, plasmid vectors, and experimental models, the observed antitumor effects were incomparable. Therefore, the current study was conducted comparing antitumor effectiveness of three different control plasmids using the same GET parameters. We followed cytotoxicity in vitro and the antitumor effect in vivo after GET of control plasmids pControl, pENTR/U6 scr and pVAX1 in B16.F10 murine melanoma cells and tumors. Types of cell death and upregulation of selected cytosolic DNA sensors and cytokines were determined. GET of all three plasmids caused significant growth delay in melanoma tumors; nevertheless, the effect of pVAX1 was significantly greater than pControl. While DNA sensors in vivo were not upregulated significantly, cytokines IFN β and TNF α were upregulated after GET of pVAX1. In vitro, the mRNAs of some cytosolic DNA sensors were overexpressed after GET; however, with no significant difference among the three plasmids. In summary, although differences in antitumor effects were observed among control plasmids in vivo, no differences in cellular responses to plasmid GET were detected in tumor cells in vitro. Thus, the tumor microenvironment as well as some plasmid properties are most probably responsible for the antitumor effectiveness. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Targeted Therapies for Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 15 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1656 | PDF Full-text (678 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related death and by 2030, it will be second only to lung cancer. We have seen tremendous advances in therapies for lung cancer as well as other solid tumors using a molecular targeted approach
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Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related death and by 2030, it will be second only to lung cancer. We have seen tremendous advances in therapies for lung cancer as well as other solid tumors using a molecular targeted approach but our progress in treating pancreatic cancer has been incremental with median overall survival remaining less than one year. There is an urgent need for improved therapies with better efficacy and less toxicity. Small molecule inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and immune modulatory therapies have been used. Here we review the progress that we have made with these targeted therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Reviewing the Utility of EUS FNA to Advance Precision Medicine in Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 27 January 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1127 | PDF Full-text (601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive malignancy with few effective therapeutic options. While the evolution of precision medicine in recent decades has changed the treatment landscape in many cancers, at present no targeted therapies are used in the routine management of PC.
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Advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive malignancy with few effective therapeutic options. While the evolution of precision medicine in recent decades has changed the treatment landscape in many cancers, at present no targeted therapies are used in the routine management of PC. Only a minority of patients with PC present with surgically resectable disease, and in the remainder obtaining high quality biopsy material for both diagnosis and molecular testing can prove challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS FNA) is a widely used diagnostic procedure in PC, and allows tumour sampling in patients with both early and late stage disease. This review will provide an update on the role of EUS FNA as a diagnostic tool, as well as a source of genetic material which can be used both for molecular analysis and for the creation of valuable preclinical disease models. We will also consider relevant clinical applications of EUS FNA in the management of PC, and the path towards bringing precision medicine closer to the clinic in this challenging disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Extracellular Influences: Molecular Subclasses and the Microenvironment in Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 21 December 2017 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 27 January 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1169 | PDF Full-text (1021 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most prevalent form of pancreatic cancer and carries the worst prognosis of all common cancers. Five-year survival rates have not surpassed 6% for some decades and this lack of improvement in outcome urges a better understanding of
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Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most prevalent form of pancreatic cancer and carries the worst prognosis of all common cancers. Five-year survival rates have not surpassed 6% for some decades and this lack of improvement in outcome urges a better understanding of the PDAC-specific features which contribute to this poor result. One of the most defining features of PDAC known to contribute to its progression is the abundance of non-tumor cells and material collectively known as the stroma. It is now well recognized that the different non-cancer cell types, signalling molecules, and mechanical properties within a tumor can have both tumor-promoting as well as –inhibitory effects. However, the net effect of this intratumour heterogeneity is not well understood. Heterogeneity in the stromal makeup between patients is even less well established. Such intertumour heterogeneity is likely to be affected by the relative contributions of individual stromal constituents, but how these contributions exactly relate to existing classifications that demarcate intertumour heterogeneity in PDAC is not fully known. In this review, we give an overview of the available evidence by delineating the elements of the PDAC stroma and their contribution to tumour growth. We do so by interpreting the heterogeneity at the gene expression level in PDAC, and how stromal elements contribute to, or interconnect, with this. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessReview The Ever-Evolving Concept of the Cancer Stem Cell in Pancreatic Cancer
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 15 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 26 January 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2373 | PDF Full-text (5196 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic cancer, is the 4th most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide, primarily due to the inherent chemoresistant nature and metastatic capacity of this tumor. The latter is believed to be mainly due to
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Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic cancer, is the 4th most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide, primarily due to the inherent chemoresistant nature and metastatic capacity of this tumor. The latter is believed to be mainly due to the existence of a subpopulation of highly plastic “stem”-like cells within the tumor, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have been shown to have unique metabolic, autophagic, invasive, and chemoresistance properties that allow them to continuously self-renew and escape chemo-therapeutic elimination. As such, current treatments for the majority of PDAC patients are not effective and do not significantly impact overall patient survival (<7 months) as they do not affect the pancreatic CSC (PaCSC) population. In this context, it is important to highlight the need to better understand the characteristics of the PaCSC population in order to develop new therapies to target these cells. In this review, we will provide the latest updates and knowledge on the inherent characteristics of PaCSCs, particularly their unique biological properties including chemoresistance, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, plasticity, metabolism and autophagy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Development in Pancreatic Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Tackling Cancer Resistance by Immunotherapy: Updated Clinical Impact and Safety of PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitors
Received: 10 December 2017 / Revised: 21 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 25 January 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3261 | PDF Full-text (505 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cancer therapy has been constantly evolving with the hope of finding the most effective agents with the least toxic effects to eradicate tumors. Cancer immunotherapy is currently among the most promising options, fulfilling this hope in a wide range of tumors. Immunotherapy aims
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Cancer therapy has been constantly evolving with the hope of finding the most effective agents with the least toxic effects to eradicate tumors. Cancer immunotherapy is currently among the most promising options, fulfilling this hope in a wide range of tumors. Immunotherapy aims to activate immunity to fight cancer in a very specific and targeted manner; however, some abnormal immune reactions known as immune-related adverse events (IRAEs) might occur. Therefore, many researchers are aiming to define the most proper protocols for managing these complications without interfering with the anticancer effect. One of these targeted approaches is the inhibition of the interaction between the checkpoint protein, programmed death-receptor 1 (PD-1), and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), via a class of antibodies known as PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. These antibodies achieved prodigious success in a wide range of malignancies, including those where optimal treatment is not yet fully identified. In this review, we have critically explored and discussed the outcome of the latest PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitor studies in different malignancies compared to standard chemotherapeutic alternatives with a special focus on the clinical efficacy and safety. The approval of the clinical applications of nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, avelumab, and durvalumab in the last few years clearly highlights the hopeful future of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for cancer patients. These promising results of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors have encouraged many ongoing preclinical and clinical trials to explore the extent of antitumor activity, clinical efficacy and safety as well as to extend their applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Cell-Penetrating CaCO3 Nanocrystals for Improved Transport of NVP-BEZ235 across Membrane Barrier in T-Cell Lymphoma
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 15 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 25 January 2018
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Abstract
Owing to their nano-sized porous structure, CaCO3 nanocrystals (CaCO3NCs) hold the promise to be utilized as desired materials for encapsulating molecules which demonstrate wide promise in drug delivery. We evaluate the possibility to encapsulate and release NVP-BEZ235, a novel and
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Owing to their nano-sized porous structure, CaCO3 nanocrystals (CaCO3NCs) hold the promise to be utilized as desired materials for encapsulating molecules which demonstrate wide promise in drug delivery. We evaluate the possibility to encapsulate and release NVP-BEZ235, a novel and potent dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor that is currently in phase I/II clinical trials for advanced solid tumors, from the CaCO3NCs. Its chemical nature shows some intrinsic limitations which induce to administer high doses leading to toxicity; to overcome these problems, here we proposed a strategy to enhance its intracellular penetration and its biological activity. Pristine CaCO3 NCs biocompatibility, cell interactions and internalization in in vitro experiments on T-cell lymphoma line, were studied. Confocal microscopy was used to monitor NCs-cell interactions and cellular uptake. We have further investigated the interaction nature and release mechanism of drug loaded/released within/from the NCs using an alternative approach based on liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Our approach provides a good loading efficiency, therefore this drug delivery system was validated for biological activity in T-cell lymphoma: the anti-proliferative test and western blot results are very interesting because the proposed nano-formulation has an efficiency higher than free drug at the same nominal concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology and Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Volumetric Modulated Arc (Radio) Therapy in Pets Treatment: The “La Cittadina Fondazione” Experience
Received: 3 November 2017 / Revised: 29 December 2017 / Accepted: 16 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
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Abstract
Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a modern technique, widely used in human radiotherapy, which allows a high dose to be delivered to tumor volumes and low doses to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). Veterinary clinics takes advantage of this feature due
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Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a modern technique, widely used in human radiotherapy, which allows a high dose to be delivered to tumor volumes and low doses to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). Veterinary clinics takes advantage of this feature due to the small target volumes and distances between the target and the OAR. Sparing the OAR permits dose escalation, and hypofractionation regimens reduce the number of treatment sessions with a simpler manageability in the veterinary field. Multimodal volumes definition is mandatory for the small volumes involved and a positioning device precisely reproducible with a setup confirmation is needed before each session for avoiding missing the target. Additionally, the elaborate treatment plan must pursue hard constraints and objectives, and its feasibility must be evaluated with a per patient quality control. The aim of this work is to report results with regard to brain meningiomas and gliomas, trigeminal nerve tumors, brachial plexus tumors, adrenal tumors with vascular invasion and rabbit thymomas, in comparison with literature to determine if VMAT is a safe and viable alternative to surgery or chemotherapy alone, or as an adjuvant therapy in pets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy)
Open AccessReview Estrogen and Androgen Blockade for Advanced Prostate Cancer in the Era of Precision Medicine
Received: 27 December 2017 / Revised: 19 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 23 January 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1863 | PDF Full-text (2685 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been widely prescribed for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) to control key signaling pathways via androgen receptor (AR) and AR-collaborative transcriptional factors; however, PC gradually acquires a lethal phenotype and results in castration-resistant PC (CRPC) during ADT.
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Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been widely prescribed for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) to control key signaling pathways via androgen receptor (AR) and AR-collaborative transcriptional factors; however, PC gradually acquires a lethal phenotype and results in castration-resistant PC (CRPC) during ADT. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are required in clinical practice. In addition, ARs; estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ); and estrogen-related receptors (ERRs; ERRα, ERRβ, and ERRγ) have been reported to be involved in the development or regulation of PC. Recent investigations have revealed the role of associated molecules, such as KLF5, FOXO1, PDGFA, VEGF-A, WNT5A, TGFβ1, and micro-RNA 135a of PC, via ERs and ERRs. Selective ER modulators (SERMs) have been developed. Recently, estrogen and androgen blockade (EAB) using a combination of toremifene and ADT has been demonstrated to improve biochemical recurrence rate in treatment-naïve bone metastatic PC. In the future, the suitability of ADT alone or EAB for individuals may be evaluated by making clinical decisions on the basis of information obtained from RT-PCR, gene-panel, or liquid biopsy to create a “personalized medicine” or “precision medicine”. In this review, we summarize ER and ERR signaling pathways, molecular diagnosis, and SERMs as candidates for advanced PC treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hormone Receptors in Genitourinary Tumors)
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