Special Issue "Feature Papers in Children's Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Children's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Jitse P. Van Dijk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Ant. Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
Tel. + 31653672733
Interests: adolescents and health; chronic disease; ethnicity and health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Zuzana Dankulincova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, PJ Safarik University in Kosice, Trieda SNP 1, 04011 Kosice, Slovakia
Interests: adolescence; mental health; well-being

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the Special Issue entitled “Feature Papers in Children’s Health”. This is a collection of important high-quality papers (original research articles or comprehensive review papers) published in Open Access form by Editorial Board Members, or prominent scholars invited by the Editorial Office and the Section Editor-in-Chief. This Special Issue aims to discuss new knowledge or new cutting-edge developments in the children’s health research field through selected works, which will make a great contribution to the community. We consider that this issue will be the best forum for disseminating excellent research findings as well as sharing innovative ideas in the field.

Papers could be either research papers with a detailed summary of their own work done so far, or papers highlighting the state-of-the-art developments in one of the areas covered by the Section “Children’s Health”. Contributions to this important Special Issue will be accepted by invitation only. In order to benefit both authors and readers, we would like to grant a discount for submissions based on evaluation.

You are welcome to send a tentative title and a short abstract to our Editorial Office ([email protected]) for evaluation before submission. Please note that selected full papers will still be subjected to a thorough and rigorous peer-review.

We are looking forward to receiving your excellent work.

Assoc. Prof. Jitse P. Van Dijk
Assoc. Prof. Zuzana Dankulincova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Children’s and adolescent’s health
  • Children’s and adolescent’s mental health
  • Child and adolescent mental health services
  • School
  • Family
  • Positive youth development
  • Socio-economic status
  • Health literacy
  • Adverse childhood experiences
  • Emotional and behavioural problems
  • Extensive internet use
  • Birth outcomes
  • Developmental disorders
  • Risk factors

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Built and Natural Environmental Correlates of Parental Safety Concerns for Children’s Active Travel to School
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 517; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020517 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
This cross-sectional study examines built and natural environmental correlates of parental safety concerns for children’s active travel to school (ATS), controlling for socio-demographic, attitudinal, and social factors. Questionnaire surveys (n = 3291) completed by parents who had 1st–6th grade children were collected [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study examines built and natural environmental correlates of parental safety concerns for children’s active travel to school (ATS), controlling for socio-demographic, attitudinal, and social factors. Questionnaire surveys (n = 3291) completed by parents who had 1st–6th grade children were collected in 2011 from 20 elementary schools in Austin, Texas. Objectively-measured built and natural environmental data were derived from two software programs: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Environment for Visualizing Images (ENVI). Ordinal least square regressions were used for statistical analyses in this study. Results from the fully adjusted final model showed that bike lanes, the presence of highway and railroads, the presence of sex offenders, and steep slopes along the home-to-school route were associated with increased parental safety concerns, while greater intersection density and greater tree canopy coverage along the route were associated with decreased parental safety concerns. Natural elements and walking-friendly elements of the built environment appear important in reducing parental safety concerns, which is a necessary step toward promoting children’s ATS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Rumination and Emotional Profile in Children with Specific Learning Disorders and Their Parents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 389; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020389 - 07 Jan 2020
Abstract
Rumination, namely a cognitive process characterized by a repetitive thinking focused on negative feelings and thoughts, is a significant predictor for the onset of internalizing symptoms and has also been found to run in families. Rumination has never been studied in children with [...] Read more.
Rumination, namely a cognitive process characterized by a repetitive thinking focused on negative feelings and thoughts, is a significant predictor for the onset of internalizing symptoms and has also been found to run in families. Rumination has never been studied in children with specific learning disorders (SLD), a population that, due to its condition, might encounter more difficulties in daily life and is at risk of increased psychological distress, compared to typically developing (TD) peers. The present study covers this gap by examining whether children with SLD, and their parents, tend to use rumination more than TD peers and their parents. The study also explores associations between rumination and both children’s and parents’ emotional profile. Results on 25 children with SLD and 25 TD peers and their parents (n = 150), showed higher levels of rumination in children with SLD when referring to a negative social situation, as well as higher levels of rumination in both mothers and fathers of children with SLD. Modest correlations between parents’ and children’s rumination traits were also found. This study offers evidence on rumination as a possible risk factor for children with SLD, particularly considering when they deal with social contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Association between the Mother’s Social Cognition and the Child’s Social Functioning in Kindergarten: The Mediating Role of the Child’s Social Cognition
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010358 - 05 Jan 2020
Abstract
Children’s ability to adjust to the social rules and expectations in the educational environment is of major concern to researchers and practitioners alike. Accordingly, the main purpose of the present study was to examine predictors of children’s social functioning in kindergarten with a [...] Read more.
Children’s ability to adjust to the social rules and expectations in the educational environment is of major concern to researchers and practitioners alike. Accordingly, the main purpose of the present study was to examine predictors of children’s social functioning in kindergarten with a specific focus on (a) maternal factors and (b) children’s social cognition. Using a multi-method (self-reports and direct assessments), multi-informant (child, mother, teacher) design, we collected data from 301 kindergarten children and their mothers tapping the mother’s social cognition (general and child-related) and parenting style, and children’s social cognition (social information processing) and functioning in kindergarten. We found direct associations between the mother and child’s social cognition, between the mother’s authoritarian parenting style and her child’s less competent social cognition and behavior, and between the child’s social cognition and social functioning. Finally, as hypothesized, we found a number of interesting mediated effects. Most notably, we found that the association between the mother’s social cognition (her tendency to attribute hostile intent to unknown others) and the child’s social cognition (his/her tendency to generate less competent responses) is fully mediated by the mother’s higher levels of authoritarian parenting style. The important theoretical and clinical implications of our findings are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Does Daily Physical Activity Level Determine the Physical Efficiency of Children After Treatment of Leukemia?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 307; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010307 - 01 Jan 2020
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess daily physical activity level and its influence on the physical efficiency of children after the treatment of leukemia. The study was comprised of 34 children (23 boys and 11 girls) after the treatment of acute [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess daily physical activity level and its influence on the physical efficiency of children after the treatment of leukemia. The study was comprised of 34 children (23 boys and 11 girls) after the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia or myeloid leukemia (mean age of 11.29 ± 2.81 years, mean body height of 146.88 ± 16.11 cm, and mean body weight of 43.68 ± 13.93 kg). The mean time since treatment completion was 3.09 ± 1.80 years. The level of physical activity was assessed with the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children questionnaire (HBSC). Physical efficiency was assessed based on the palant ball throw (assessment of strength, coordination, and upper limb speed), the long jump (assessment of jumping ability, speed and coordination) and the 60 m run (assessment of speed). Measurements of motor skills were normalized, classified according to age and sex, and converted into grades. The mean values obtained in the run and the ball throw showed low pass grades in the study group. In the case of the long jump, satisfactory grades were obtained. A correlation of r = 0.512 was found between vigorous physical activity (HBSC 3) and the grade in the run. A correlation of r = −0.437 was observed between the duration of computer use in leisure time (HBSC 6) and the grade in the long jump, whereas correlations of r = −0.482 and −0.485 were noted between the number hours per week spent on games (HBSC 5) and the duration of computer use in leisure time (HBSC 6) and the grade obtained in the ball throw, respectively. In addition, different levels of physical activity and physical efficiency were demonstrated depending on the time elapsed since treatment completion. Supervised programs promoting daily physical activity should include children after the treatment of leukemia. These programs should also be aimed at improving their physical efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Risk of Urticaria in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010176 - 25 Dec 2019
Abstract
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been linked to many autoimmune problems. The association between T1DM and urticaria warrants investigation. Data were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Participants with T1DM were recruited as the case group, and [...] Read more.
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been linked to many autoimmune problems. The association between T1DM and urticaria warrants investigation. Data were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Participants with T1DM were recruited as the case group, and that group was matched by sex and age at a ratio of 1:4 to the control group comprising those without T1DM. The study period was 1998–2011. All participants were followed up to the diagnosis of urticaria, withdrawal from the insurance program, death, or the end of the study. A multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the adjusted and crude hazard ratios for urticaria. A total of 5895 participants (1179 in the case group and 4716 in the control group) were followed up in the study. The total incidence rate of urticaria in patients with type 1 DM was 26.6 per 1000 person-years, and that in controls was 6.85 per 1000 person-years. Compared with the control group, the hazard ratio of urticaria in the case group was 2.84 (95% CI = 2.27–3.56). Compared with age-matched participants without T1DM, patients with type 1 DM aged <18 years had a 3.62-fold higher risk of urticaria (95% CI = 2.85–4.59). The hazard ratio in patients with an adjusted Diabetes Complications Severity Index (aDCSI) score of 1.01–2.00 per year was 2.57 (95% CI = 1.18–5.57), and that in patients with an aDCSI score of >2.00 per year was 4.47 (95% CI = 2.68–7.47). T1DM patients aged <18 years had an increased risk of urticaria, but a similar phenomenon was not observed among T1DM patients older than 18 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Greenness Availability and Respiratory Health in a Population of Urbanised Children in North-Western Italy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010108 - 22 Dec 2019
Abstract
Paediatric Asthma contributes in paediatric global burden of diseases, as the most common chronic disease in children. Children are exposed to many environmental risk-factors, able to determine or worsen respiratory diseases, and contributing to asthma and asthma-like symptoms increases, especially in metropolitan areas. [...] Read more.
Paediatric Asthma contributes in paediatric global burden of diseases, as the most common chronic disease in children. Children are exposed to many environmental risk-factors, able to determine or worsen respiratory diseases, and contributing to asthma and asthma-like symptoms increases, especially in metropolitan areas. In urban settings, surrounding vegetation (greenness) may provide important benefits to health, including the promotion of physical activity and the mitigation of air and noise pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between greenness and respiratory health. A total of 187 children (10–13 yrs old) were recruited in Turin, the north-western part of Italy. The prevalence of asthma and asthma-like symptoms was calculated from self-reported data collected by SIDRIA questionnaire. Spirometry test was performed to obtain respiratory flow measurements. Greenness was measured at individual level through the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) estimations from remote-sensing images. Higher exposure (3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile) to NDVI was associated to significantly lower ORs for asthma [0.13 CI 95% 0.02–0.7, p = 0.019], bronchitis [0.14 CI 95% 0.05–0.45, p = 0.001], and current wheezing [0.25 CI 95% 0.09–0.70, p = 0.008]. A significative positive association was found between greenness and FEF25–75, since children exposed to the 2nd tertile of NDVI reported a significantly decreased FEF25–75 compared to those in the 3rd tertile [B: −2.40; C.I.95%: −0.48–0.01; p = 0.049]. This cross-sectional study provided additional data on still inconsistent literature referring to respiratory health in children and green spaces, attesting a positive effect of greenness in a specific area of Italy. Further research is still needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS): 3D-Analysis of Palatal Depth and 3D-Metric Facial Length
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010095 - 21 Dec 2019
Abstract
Background: Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can result in severe developmental disorders in the child. Symptoms of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) comprise growth deficiencies, abnormal facial phenotype and damage or dysfunction of the central nervous system. Numerous diagnostic methods for facial [...] Read more.
Background: Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can result in severe developmental disorders in the child. Symptoms of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) comprise growth deficiencies, abnormal facial phenotype and damage or dysfunction of the central nervous system. Numerous diagnostic methods for facial phenotyping in FASD exist, but diagnoses are still difficult. Our aim was to find additional and objective methods for the verification of FAS(D). Methods: Three-dimensional dental models of 60 children (30 FAS and 30 controls) were used to metrically determine maximum palatal depths at the median palatine raphe. Three-dimensional facial scans were taken, and vertical distances of the face were measured at five defined facial landmarks (FP1–FP5) for each child. Results: Mean palatal height, total facial length (FP1–FP5) as well as FP4–FP5 did not significantly differ between the FAS group and the control group. Comparing vertical facial subdivisions, however, resulted in significant differences for distances FP1 to FP2 (p = 0.042, FAS > controls), FP2 to FP3 (p < 0.001, FAS < controls), FP3 to FP4 (p < 0.001, FAS > controls) and FP3 to FP5 (p = 0.007, FAS > controls). Conclusions: Metric vertical measurements of the face can be used as additional objective criteria for FAS diagnoses. However, no significant differences were reported for palatal depth evaluation in the specific age range tested in the present study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Telephone Aftercare Intervention for Obese Hispanic Children on Body Fat Percentage, Physical Fitness, and Blood Lipid Profiles
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5133; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16245133 - 16 Dec 2019
Abstract
We investigated effects of 10-month telephone aftercare intervention following primary obesity intervention on changes in body fat percentage, physical fitness, and lipid profiles in obese Hispanic children. Seventy-one obese children were randomly assigned to (1) primary intervention and 10-month telephone aftercare intervention (PITI; [...] Read more.
We investigated effects of 10-month telephone aftercare intervention following primary obesity intervention on changes in body fat percentage, physical fitness, and lipid profiles in obese Hispanic children. Seventy-one obese children were randomly assigned to (1) primary intervention and 10-month telephone aftercare intervention (PITI; N = 26), (2) primary intervention only (PI; n = 25), and (3) control (CON; N = 20). Anthropometric data, physical fitness, and blood samples were obtained before (PRE) and after (POST) eight-week primary intervention, and 10-month telephone aftercare intervention (1YEAR). Eight weeks of primary intervention significantly reduced body fat percentage, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) with increases in VO2max, flexibility, muscular strength, and HDL-C (PITI and PI, p < 0.05). 1YEAR measurements returned to baseline for the PI whereas those measurements in PITI remained significantly different when compared to PRE (p < 0.05). CON observed negative changes in all variables at POST, which were improved slightly during the subsequent school year. Levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL-C are correlated to changes in body fat percentage, suggesting that fat loss is effective in preventing and managing obesity-related disorders. Results indicate that telephone intervention is an effective aftercare in stabilizing positive changes obtained from a short-term intensive intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
Open AccessArticle
Association between Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy and Missing Teeth in Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4536; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224536 - 16 Nov 2019
Abstract
Tooth agenesis and disturbance of tooth eruption is the most prevalent oral defect, and is possibly caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. We hypothesized that prenatal factors may affect tooth development. The objective of this study was to examine whether [...] Read more.
Tooth agenesis and disturbance of tooth eruption is the most prevalent oral defect, and is possibly caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. We hypothesized that prenatal factors may affect tooth development. The objective of this study was to examine whether smoking during pregnancy was associated with missing teeth in the offspring during adolescence. The study population comprised pregnant women and their children registered (N = 1052) at Koshu city, Japan. When the expectant mothers visited the city office for pregnancy registration, a survey was conducted to ascertain their lifestyle habits. Data on missing teeth in the children were obtained from the compulsory dental health checkup during junior high school years. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to assess the association between missing teeth and lifestyle habits. A total of 772 children were studied. The prevalence of missing teeth in these children was 4.9%. Children whose mothers smoked six cigarettes or more per day were 4.59 (95% CI: 1.07–19.67) times more likely to present with missing teeth than those children whose mothers did not smoke, after adjustment for possible confounders. Our findings indicate that smoking during pregnancy can be a risk factor for missing teeth in the offspring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing Vitamins, Minerals and Supplements Marketed to Children in Canada
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224326 - 06 Nov 2019
Abstract
Given the growth of supplements specifically designed for children in Canada, this study examines the nutrient levels of these products, and evaluates them in light of the US Health and Medical Division (HMD)—formerly the Institute of Medicine—and Health Canada’s recommendations. Content analysis was [...] Read more.
Given the growth of supplements specifically designed for children in Canada, this study examines the nutrient levels of these products, and evaluates them in light of the US Health and Medical Division (HMD)—formerly the Institute of Medicine—and Health Canada’s recommendations. Content analysis was used to document the nutrient levels of child-targeted vitamins, minerals and fish oils/omega-3s (n = 80) in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Products were assessed according to HMD and Health Canada dosage recommendations for children, and the percentage of Estimate Average Requirements (EAR), Adequate Intakes (AI), and Tolerable Upper Intakes Level (UL) calculated. Median EAR/AI/UL percentages and quartiles were calculated for each nutrient, and estimates for the adequate intake recommendations plotted with box plots. Sixty five percent of the products assessed were multivitamins; the median dose was higher than AI recommendations for vitamins A, B6, B12, and C, as well as thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, and biotin. Substantial variation in vitamin, mineral, or fish oil dosage was found between similar supplements—with nutrients such as vitamin B12 ranging from 83% to 5557% of AI. Such findings matter because the very existence of these products suggests that children should be taking them, yet more research is needed on their potential (adverse) effects over both the short and long term. The substantial variation in dosages between products also raises questions about the (perhaps unnecessary) fortification of our children, as well as the expectations that parents know—or are even aware of—appropriate nutrient levels for their kids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Daily Physical Activity Among Toddlers: Hip and Wrist Accelerometer Assessments
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4244; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214244 - 01 Nov 2019
Abstract
Physical activity (PA) habits seem to track over time from as young as early childhood. For children under age 3 years, wearable sensor-measured PA levels have begun to be investigated. The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using hip- [...] Read more.
Physical activity (PA) habits seem to track over time from as young as early childhood. For children under age 3 years, wearable sensor-measured PA levels have begun to be investigated. The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using hip- vs. wrist-worn accelerometers, and to report accelerometer-derived PA metrics among toddlers. A convenience sample of 22 toddlers aged 13 to 35 months and their mothers were recruited for this study. ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometers were attached to wrist bands and waist belts. The mothers were asked to affix a wrist band and a waist belt to their participating children during waking hours for four days. They also completed an acceptability survey. Of the 22 toddlers, 19 (86%) had ≥ 3 valid days of hip data, while only 14 (64%) did so for wrist data (p = 0.16). In terms of acceptability, 18 mothers (82%) responded that the 4-day hip wear was easy, while only 13 (59%) responded that the 4-day wrist wear was easy (p = 0.19). Daily light-intensity PA (LPA) was on average 161 min, and daily moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA) was on average 47 min, as determined using published hip accelerometer cut-points. There were no significant differences in LPA or MVPA by age or by sex. In conclusion, this study suggests that hip placement of an ActiGraph accelerometer is more feasible than wrist placement among toddlers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Breastfeeding in the Community—How Can Partners/Fathers Help? A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 413; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020413 - 08 Jan 2020
Abstract
Support from partners/fathers and families can play a significant role in a mother’s decision to initiate, continue or cease breastfeeding postnatally. This study systematically reviewed published studies to determine the impact of specific types of partner support on breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. [...] Read more.
Support from partners/fathers and families can play a significant role in a mother’s decision to initiate, continue or cease breastfeeding postnatally. This study systematically reviewed published studies to determine the impact of specific types of partner support on breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. We used the 2015 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines for the review. Seven computerized bibliographic databases (Embase, ProQuest Central, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Science, MEDLINE/PubMed and CINAHL) were searched. Of a total of 695 articles retrieved from the databases, seven studies met the inclusion criteria and reported on breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Four of the seven studies found that partner support in the form of verbal encouragement to new mothers increased breastfeeding duration and exclusivity. Other types of partner supportive actions that led to improved breastfeeding behavior included sensitivity of the partner to the nursing mother’s needs, assistance in preventing and managing breastfeeding difficulties, and helping with household and child care duties. This review showed that specific supportive actions of partners/fathers in the community positively improved breastfeeding practices. To maximise the impact of breastfeeding policies and interventions among new mothers, breastfeeding programmes should consider the involvement of partners/fathers and their specific roles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Measuring complex experiences of health-care: the development of an innovative child-reported experience measure using participatory design
Authors: Malin Berghammer 1; Margaretha Jenholt Nolbris 1; Mohamed Hajir 1; John Chaplin 1,2
Affiliation: 1 Department of Paediatrics, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital; 2 Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden
 
Title: Being heard—moving from professional-centred to child-centred care using augmentative and alternative communication as universal design
Authors: Stefan Nilsson 1, Joakim Öhlén 1,2, Gunilla Thunberg 3
Affiliation: 1 Institute of Health and Care Sciences, and University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2 Palliative Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Palliative Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3 DART center for AAC and AT, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
 
Title: Sand-Skin Hand and Body Adherence: Potential Influence on Exposure to Oil Spill Chemicals
Authors: Alesia Ferguson 1, Ashok Dwidevi 1, Foluke Adelabeu 1, Esther Ehindero 1, Kristina Mena 2 and Helena Solo Gabriele 3
Affiliation: 1 North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; 2 University of Texas; 3 University of Miami
 
Title: Longitudinal Participation trends in predicting mental health in children with and without physical difficulty
Author: Ai-Wen Hwang
Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan

Title: Does Daily Physical Activity Level Determine the Physical Efficiency of Children after Leukemia Treatment?
Author: Iwona Malicka
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