Special Issue "Review Papers in Children’s Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Children's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jitse P. van Dijk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
2. Olomouc University Social Health Institute, Palacky University Olomouc, 771 11 Olomouc, Czech Republic
3. Graduate School Kosice Institute for Society and Health, P.J. Safarik University in Kosice, 040 11 Kosice, Slovakia
Interests: mental health; adolescents; Roma health; religiosity/spirituality and health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (Impact Factor: 2.468 (2018)) intends to initiate a series of review-only Special Issues.

Under the Section “Children’s Health”, this Special Issue aims to collect a set of high-quality review papers that highlight the most recent advances in the field of children’s health. We kindly encourage all research groups covering relevant areas within the Section’s scope to contribute up-to-date, full-length comprehensive reviews, highlighting the latest developments in their research field, or to invite relevant experts and colleagues to do so. This Special Issue primarily publishes review papers by invitation, but will also publish reviews on topics of particular interest that do not overlap with current or recent Special Issues (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/sections/Children_Health).

Distinguished researchers from all over the world will be invited to contribute to this issue. Potential contributors/invited authors are kindly requested to submit a tentative title and a short abstract to our Editorial Office ([email protected]) for pre-evaluation. Please note that selected full papers will still be subjected to a thorough and rigorous peer-review. All papers will be published on an ongoing basis.

Prof. Dr. Jitse P. van Dijk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Review
  • Child or adolescent
  • Mental health
  • Physical health
  • Environmental health
  • Obesity, overweight
  • Health literacy
  • School, education
  • Cultural capital
  • Socioeconomic status

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
Health Inequalities in Children and Adolescents: A Scoping Review of the Mediating and Moderating Effects of Family Characteristics
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7739; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157739 - 21 Jul 2021
Viewed by 282
Abstract
This scoping review systematically mapped evidence of the mediating and moderating effects of family characteristics on health inequalities in school-aged children and adolescents (6–18 years) in countries with developed economies in Europe and North America. We conducted a systematic scoping review following the [...] Read more.
This scoping review systematically mapped evidence of the mediating and moderating effects of family characteristics on health inequalities in school-aged children and adolescents (6–18 years) in countries with developed economies in Europe and North America. We conducted a systematic scoping review following the PRISMA extension for Scoping Reviews recommendations. We searched the PubMed, PsycINFO and Scopus databases. Two reviewers independently screened titles, abstracts and full texts. Evidence was synthesized narratively. Of the 12,403 records initially identified, 50 articles were included in the synthesis. The included studies were conducted in the United States (n = 27), Europe (n = 18), Canada (n = 3), or in multiple countries combined (n = 2). We found that mental health was the most frequently assessed health outcome. The included studies reported that different family characteristics mediated or moderated health inequalities. Parental mental health, parenting practices, and parent-child-relationships were most frequently examined, and were found to be important mediating or moderating factors. In addition, family conflict and distress were relevant family characteristics. Future research should integrate additional health outcomes besides mental health, and attempt to integrate the complexity of families. The family characteristics identified in this review represent potential starting points for reducing health inequalities in childhood and adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers in Children’s Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Roles of the Maternal and Child Health Handbook and Other Home-Based Records on Newborn and Child Health: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7463; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147463 - 13 Jul 2021
Viewed by 577
Abstract
Home-based records are paper or electronic records retained and used by mothers or caregivers to document the health services received for maternal, newborn, and child health. Little has been studied about the roles of these records on newborn and child health outcomes. Hence, [...] Read more.
Home-based records are paper or electronic records retained and used by mothers or caregivers to document the health services received for maternal, newborn, and child health. Little has been studied about the roles of these records on newborn and child health outcomes. Hence, we collated and summarized evidence concerning the roles of home-based records in improving newborn and child health. We conducted a systematic search in several databases: MEDLINE, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Academic Search Complete, SocINDEX, CENTRAL, DARE, NHS EED, HTA, J-STAGE, Ichushi, and gray literature. We included original research articles of all study designs published in English or Japanese until January 2020. Owing to heterogeneity across the outcomes of included studies, we conducted a narrative synthesis. We included 55 studies (23 in Japanese) among 14,017 identified articles. We identified the following roles of home-based records on newborn and child health: promoted newborn/childcare seeking, improved knowledge and practices of newborn/childcare, encouraged home care for childhood illnesses, reduced child mortality and morbidity, and facilitated continuum of care. We observed a mixed effect on age-appropriate immunization (e.g., DTP3 completion) and no effect on the practice of immediate breastfeeding and prevention of perinatal mortality and morbidity. The findings highlighted the effectiveness and usefulness of home-based records to improve newborn and child health outcomes. However, only a few studies were available for each outcome category, limiting the certainty of evidence provided in this review. Therefore, we recommend further studies to explore the benefits of home-based records on improving newborn and child health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers in Children’s Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
The Effects of Active Video Games on Health-Related Physical Fitness and Motor Competence in Children and Adolescents with Healthy Weight: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6965; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136965 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 395
Abstract
(1) Background: Poor levels of physical fitness and motor skills are problems for today’s children. Active video games (AVG) could be an attractive strategy to help address them. The aim was to investigate the effects of AVG on health-related physical fitness and motor [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Poor levels of physical fitness and motor skills are problems for today’s children. Active video games (AVG) could be an attractive strategy to help address them. The aim was to investigate the effects of AVG on health-related physical fitness and motor competence in children and adolescents with healthy weight. (2) Methods: Randomized and non-randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of AVG programs on health-related physical fitness and motor competence were included. Two different quality assessment tools were used to measure the risk of bias. Twenty articles met the inclusion criteria and the variables of interest were body mass index (BMI), body fat, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscular fitness and motor competence. (3) Results: AVG interventions seem to have benefits in BMI when lasting longer than 18 weeks (SMD, −0.590; 95% IC, −1.071, −0.108) and in CRF (SMD, 0.438; 95% IC, 0.022, 0.855). AVG seems to be a promising tool to improve muscular fitness and motor competence but the effects are still unclear due to the lack of evidence. (4) Conclusions: AVG seem to be an effective tool for improving some components of health-related physical fitness and motor competence in healthy-weight children and adolescents, but the effect on some fitness components needs further research. Therefore, AVG may be included as a strategy to improve health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers in Children’s Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Which Meso-Level Characteristics of Early Childhood Education and Care Centers Are Associated with Health, Health Behavior, and Well-Being of Young Children? Findings of a Scoping Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4973; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094973 - 07 May 2021
Viewed by 741
Abstract
Characteristics of early childhood education and care (ECEC) centers might be relevant for children’s health. This scoping review aims to provide an overview of the association between meso-level characteristics (MLCs) of ECEC centers with children’s health, health behavior, and wellbeing. Five databases were [...] Read more.
Characteristics of early childhood education and care (ECEC) centers might be relevant for children’s health. This scoping review aims to provide an overview of the association between meso-level characteristics (MLCs) of ECEC centers with children’s health, health behavior, and wellbeing. Five databases were searched for quantitative and qualitative research articles published in English or German since 1 January 2000 on health, health behavior, and wellbeing of children aged 0 to 6 years considering MLCs of ECEC centers. Two authors screened 10,396 potentially eligible manuscripts and identified 117 papers, including 3077 examinations of the association between MLCs and children’s health indicators (Kappas > 0.91). Five categories of MLCs were identified: (1) structural characteristics, (2) equipment/furnishings, (3) location, (4) facilities/environment, (5) culture/activities/policies/practices, and 6) staff. Only very few studies found an association of MLCs with body weight/obesity, and general health and wellbeing. Especially physical activity and mental health were related to MLCs. In general, the location (rural vs. urban, neighborhood status) seemed to be a relevant health aspect. MLCs of ECEC centers appeared relevant for child health indicators to different degrees. Future research should focus on these associations, in detail, to identify concrete ECEC indicators that can support health promotion in early childhood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers in Children’s Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
A Systematic Review of Self-Report Instruments for the Measurement of Anxiety in Hospitalized Children with Cancer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1911; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041911 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1340
Abstract
Anxiety has been identified as one of the most severe and long-lasting symptoms experienced by hospitalized children with cancer. Self-reports are especially important for documenting emotional and abstract concepts, such as anxiety. Children may not always be able to communicate their symptoms due [...] Read more.
Anxiety has been identified as one of the most severe and long-lasting symptoms experienced by hospitalized children with cancer. Self-reports are especially important for documenting emotional and abstract concepts, such as anxiety. Children may not always be able to communicate their symptoms due to language difficulties, a lack of developmental language skills, or the severity of their illness. Instruments with sufficient psychometric quality and pictorial support may address this communication challenge. The purpose of this review was to systematically search the published literature and identify validated and reliable self-report instruments available for children aged 5–18 years to use in the assessment of their anxiety to ensure they receive appropriate anxiety-relief intervention in hospital. What validated self-report instruments can children with cancer use to self-report anxiety in the hospital setting? Which of these instruments offer pictorial support? Eight instruments were identified, but most of the instruments lacked pictorial support. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL™) 3.0 Brain Tumor Module and Cancer Module proved to be useful in hospitalized children with cancer, as they provide pictorial support. It is recommended that faces or symbols be used along with the VAS, as pictures are easily understood by younger children. Future studies could include the adaptation of existing instruments in digital e-health tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers in Children’s Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Obesity Prevention within the Early Childhood Education and Care Setting: A Systematic Review of Dietary Behavior and Physical Activity Policies and Guidelines in High Income Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 838; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020838 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1611
Abstract
As a strategy for early childhood obesity prevention, a variety of dietary behavior and physical activity policies and guidelines published by leading health agencies and early childhood education and care (ECEC) licensing and accreditation bodies exist. Given the potential diversity in recommendations from [...] Read more.
As a strategy for early childhood obesity prevention, a variety of dietary behavior and physical activity policies and guidelines published by leading health agencies and early childhood education and care (ECEC) licensing and accreditation bodies exist. Given the potential diversity in recommendations from these policies, this narrative review sought to synthesize, appraise and describe the various policies and guidelines made by organizational and professional bodies to highlight consistent recommendations and identify opportunities to strengthen such policies. An electronic bibliographic search of seven online databases and grey literature sources was undertaken. Records were included if they were policies or guidelines with specific recommendations addressing dietary behavior and/or physical activity practice implementation within the ECEC setting; included children aged >12 months and <6 years and were developed for high income countries. Recommended dietary behavior and physical activity policies and practices were synthesized into broad themes using the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity framework, and the quality of included guidelines appraised. Our search identified 38 eligible publications mostly from the US and Australia. Identified guidelines were largely consistent in their recommendation and frequently addressed the physical and sociocultural environment and were well-aligned with research evidence. Broader consideration of policy and economic environments may be needed to increase the impact of such policies and guidelines within the ECEC setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers in Children’s Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
The Impact of Overweight and Obesity on Plantar Pressure in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6600; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186600 - 10 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 938
Abstract
We aimed to synthesise the results of previous studies addressing the impact of overweight and obesity on plantar pressure in children and adolescents. An electronic search of scientific literature was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane and Scopus database, with keywords: “plantar pressure” AND “children” [...] Read more.
We aimed to synthesise the results of previous studies addressing the impact of overweight and obesity on plantar pressure in children and adolescents. An electronic search of scientific literature was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane and Scopus database, with keywords: “plantar pressure” AND “children” AND “obesity”; “plantar pressure” AND “adolescents” AND “obesity”, “plantar pressure” AND “children” AND “overweight”, “plantar pressure” AND “adolescents” AND “overweight”. Twenty-two articles were included in the review and the following data were recorded: authors, publication year, type of technology (systems, software) for the determination of plantar pressure, study characteristics. Most of the articles used dynamic plantar pressure determination with only four using static plantar pressure measurement. Using ultrasonography with static plantar pressure determination, the correlation between structural and functional changes in the feet of obese children. In overweight and obese children and adolescents, important findings were recorded: higher contact area, increased maximum force beneath the lateral and medial forefoot, increased pressure–time integral beneath the midfoot and 2nd–5th metatarsal regions. Significantly increased foot axis angle and significantly flatter feet were observed in obese subjects in comparison to their normal-weight counterparts. The obese children presented increased midfoot fat pad thickness, with decreased sensitivity of the whole foot and midfoot. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers in Children’s Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop