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Open AccessArticle

Built and Natural Environmental Correlates of Parental Safety Concerns for Children’s Active Travel to School

by Young-Jae Kim 1,* and Chanam Lee 2
1
Department of Forest Resources and Landscape Architecture, Yeungnam University, 280 Daehak-Ro, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 38541, Korea
2
Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 517; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020517
Received: 21 November 2019 / Revised: 18 December 2019 / Accepted: 2 January 2020 / Published: 14 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
This cross-sectional study examines built and natural environmental correlates of parental safety concerns for children’s active travel to school (ATS), controlling for socio-demographic, attitudinal, and social factors. Questionnaire surveys (n = 3291) completed by parents who had 1st–6th grade children were collected in 2011 from 20 elementary schools in Austin, Texas. Objectively-measured built and natural environmental data were derived from two software programs: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Environment for Visualizing Images (ENVI). Ordinal least square regressions were used for statistical analyses in this study. Results from the fully adjusted final model showed that bike lanes, the presence of highway and railroads, the presence of sex offenders, and steep slopes along the home-to-school route were associated with increased parental safety concerns, while greater intersection density and greater tree canopy coverage along the route were associated with decreased parental safety concerns. Natural elements and walking-friendly elements of the built environment appear important in reducing parental safety concerns, which is a necessary step toward promoting children’s ATS. View Full-Text
Keywords: active travel to school; home-to-school route; built and natural environment; parental safety concerns; children active travel to school; home-to-school route; built and natural environment; parental safety concerns; children
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Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, C. Built and Natural Environmental Correlates of Parental Safety Concerns for Children’s Active Travel to School. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 517.

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