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Article

Greenness Availability and Respiratory Health in a Population of Urbanised Children in North-Western Italy

1
Department of Public Health and Pediatrics, University of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
2
Specialty School in Respiratory Diseases, University of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
3
Complex Structure of Pneumology, Local Health Authority of the City of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010108
Received: 27 November 2019 / Revised: 16 December 2019 / Accepted: 20 December 2019 / Published: 22 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Feature Papers in Children's Health)
Paediatric Asthma contributes in paediatric global burden of diseases, as the most common chronic disease in children. Children are exposed to many environmental risk-factors, able to determine or worsen respiratory diseases, and contributing to asthma and asthma-like symptoms increases, especially in metropolitan areas. In urban settings, surrounding vegetation (greenness) may provide important benefits to health, including the promotion of physical activity and the mitigation of air and noise pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between greenness and respiratory health. A total of 187 children (10–13 yrs old) were recruited in Turin, the north-western part of Italy. The prevalence of asthma and asthma-like symptoms was calculated from self-reported data collected by SIDRIA questionnaire. Spirometry test was performed to obtain respiratory flow measurements. Greenness was measured at individual level through the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) estimations from remote-sensing images. Higher exposure (3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile) to NDVI was associated to significantly lower ORs for asthma [0.13 CI 95% 0.02–0.7, p = 0.019], bronchitis [0.14 CI 95% 0.05–0.45, p = 0.001], and current wheezing [0.25 CI 95% 0.09–0.70, p = 0.008]. A significative positive association was found between greenness and FEF25–75, since children exposed to the 2nd tertile of NDVI reported a significantly decreased FEF25–75 compared to those in the 3rd tertile [B: −2.40; C.I.95%: −0.48–0.01; p = 0.049]. This cross-sectional study provided additional data on still inconsistent literature referring to respiratory health in children and green spaces, attesting a positive effect of greenness in a specific area of Italy. Further research is still needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: children health; greenness; respiratory function; environmental primary prevention; asthma children health; greenness; respiratory function; environmental primary prevention; asthma
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MDPI and ACS Style

Squillacioti, G.; Bellisario, V.; Levra, S.; Piccioni, P.; Bono, R. Greenness Availability and Respiratory Health in a Population of Urbanised Children in North-Western Italy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 108. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010108

AMA Style

Squillacioti G, Bellisario V, Levra S, Piccioni P, Bono R. Greenness Availability and Respiratory Health in a Population of Urbanised Children in North-Western Italy. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(1):108. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010108

Chicago/Turabian Style

Squillacioti, Giulia, Valeria Bellisario, Stefano Levra, Pavilio Piccioni, and Roberto Bono. 2020. "Greenness Availability and Respiratory Health in a Population of Urbanised Children in North-Western Italy" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 1: 108. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010108

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