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Article

Connected, Respected and Contributing to Their World: The Case of Sexual Minority and Non-Minority Young People in Ireland

1
Health Promotion Research Centre, National University of Ireland Galway, H91 TK33 Galway, Ireland
2
School of Education, National University of Ireland Galway, H91 TK33 Galway, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1118; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031118
Received: 31 December 2020 / Revised: 21 January 2021 / Accepted: 23 January 2021 / Published: 27 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Feature Papers in Children's Health)
Outcome 5 of the Irish Better Outcomes, Brighter Futures national youth policy framework (“Connected, respected, and contributing to their world”) offers a suitable way to study psychosocial determinants of adolescent health. The present study (1) provides nationally representative data on how 15- to 17-year-olds score on these indicators; (2) compares sexual minority (same- and both-gender attracted youth) with their non-minority peers. We analyzed data from 3354 young people (aged 15.78 ± 0.78 years) participating in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in Ireland. Age and social class were associated with the indicators only to a small extent, but girls were more likely than boys to report discrimination based on gender and age. Frequency of positive answers ranged from 67% (feeling comfortable with friends) to 12% (being involved in volunteer work). Sexual minority youth were more likely to feel discriminated based on sexual orientation, age, and gender. Both-gender attracted youth were less likely than the other groups to report positive outcomes. Same-gender attracted youth were twice as likely as non-minority youth to volunteer. The results indicate the importance of a comprehensive approach to psycho-social factors in youth health, and the need for inclusivity of sexual minority (especially bisexual) youth. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent health; psycho-social determinants of health; better outcomes brighter futures framework; BOBF; health behaviour in school-aged children study; HBSC; sexual minority youth; discrimination adolescent health; psycho-social determinants of health; better outcomes brighter futures framework; BOBF; health behaviour in school-aged children study; HBSC; sexual minority youth; discrimination
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MDPI and ACS Style

Költő, A.; Gavin, A.; Vaughan, E.; Kelly, C.; Molcho, M.; Nic Gabhainn, S. Connected, Respected and Contributing to Their World: The Case of Sexual Minority and Non-Minority Young People in Ireland. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1118. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031118

AMA Style

Költő A, Gavin A, Vaughan E, Kelly C, Molcho M, Nic Gabhainn S. Connected, Respected and Contributing to Their World: The Case of Sexual Minority and Non-Minority Young People in Ireland. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1118. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031118

Chicago/Turabian Style

Költő, András, Aoife Gavin, Elena Vaughan, Colette Kelly, Michal Molcho, and Saoirse Nic Gabhainn. 2021. "Connected, Respected and Contributing to Their World: The Case of Sexual Minority and Non-Minority Young People in Ireland" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1118. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031118

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