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Open AccessArticle

Associations of Socioeconomic Status, Parental Smoking and Parental E-Cigarette Use with 10–11-Year-Old Children’s Perceptions of Tobacco Cigarettes and E-Cigarettes: Cross Sectional Analysis of the CHETS Wales 3 Survey

1
DECIPHer, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Wales CF10 3BD, UK
2
SPECTRUM Consortium, UK
3
MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, Scotland G2 3AX, UK
4
DECIPHer, Centre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, Wales CF14 4YS, UK
5
Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales CF5 2YB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030683
Received: 27 September 2019 / Revised: 7 January 2020 / Accepted: 9 January 2020 / Published: 21 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Children's Health)
Background: This study examines primary schoolchildren’s perceptions of e-cigarettes and tobacco cigarettes, and associations with parental smoking, vaping and socioeconomic status. Methods: Survey of 2218 10–11-year-old children in 73 schools in Wales. Results: Overall, 36% reported that a parent figure smoked compared to 21% for vaping, with parental smoking lower in affluent families (OR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.76). Overall, 1% had tried a cigarette, while 5% had tried an e-cigarette. Most said they would not smoke or vape in 2 years’ time; susceptibility to vaping (20%) was higher than smoking (12%). Exposure to and perceptions of tobacco cigarettes were more positive for children of smokers. Having a parent who vaped was associated with exposure to and positive perceptions of e-cigarettes, but not smoking. Most children perceived e-cigarettes as used by adults to stop smoking (64%). Susceptibility to smoking (OR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.41 to 0.79) and vaping (OR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.99) were lower among children who perceived e-cigarettes as cessation aids. Conclusions: Parental smoking continues to be concentrated in poorer families. This study provides no evidence that parental vaping in the absence of smoking is associated with more positive perceptions of tobacco cigarettes. Communicating to children the role of e-cigarettes as cessation devices for smokers may help to limit their appeal to young people. View Full-Text
Keywords: e-cigarettes; tobacco; smoking; children; parents e-cigarettes; tobacco; smoking; children; parents
MDPI and ACS Style

Moore, G.F.; Angel, L.; Gray, L.; Copeland, L.; Van Godwin, J.; Segrott, J.; Hallingberg, B. Associations of Socioeconomic Status, Parental Smoking and Parental E-Cigarette Use with 10–11-Year-Old Children’s Perceptions of Tobacco Cigarettes and E-Cigarettes: Cross Sectional Analysis of the CHETS Wales 3 Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 683.

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