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Special Issue "Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Children Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Jitse P. van Dijk

Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Ant. Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Roma health; Roma health disadvantage; chronic disease; adolescents and health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) welcomes submissions for a Special Issue focusing on “Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health”.

IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal with a current impact factor (2016) of 2.101 (5-year impact factor of 2.54) that publishes research articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. More details about the journal can be found at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

The Special Issue on “Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health” is meant to show the recent trends in studying the health of adolescents and children. Such an overview is also necessary to nuance statements such as the following: “most children in the WHO European Region have a happy, healthy childhood and adolescence where they grow and develop into prosperous adults”. In this period of the life-course identity is formulated, experimentations are made, and independence is developed. Furthermore, the inequality issue is relevant for children and adolescents. Inequality between and within all WHO’s Member States, unequal access to quality services, maltreatment and unhealthy lifestyles, are negatively affecting health among the most vulnerable groups in our societies—children and adolescents.

We are interested in topics such as, though not limited to:

  • Factors influencing child and adolescent public health at various levels (individual, family, peers, society, etc.)
  • Physical health, as well as mental health
  • Quality of life, social participation
  • Innovative interventions in the broad field of care and prevention
  • The role of key stakeholders (e.g., children themselves, peers, parents, teachers)
  • Various settings (e.g., home, school, neighborhood, care, communities)
  • Organizational and/or policy changes

Researchers are invited to contribute novel work to be considered for publication in this Special Issue. Submissions should include original articles, critical reviews (systematic reviews or meta-analyses), or brief reports. Articles that focus on the above-mentioned key aspects, or that can be brought into a relationship with them, are welcomed. Additionally, articles that focus on underrepresented or disadvantaged communities are encouraged.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Jitse van Dijk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical and mental health
  • Youth
  • Care
  • Environment
  • Social factors
  • Interventions
  • Health promotion
  • Parental influence
  • School’s or Teacher’s influence
  • Health disparities
  • Policy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle “In my day…”- Parents’ Views on Children’s Physical Activity and Screen Viewing in Relation to Their Own Childhood
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2547; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112547 (registering DOI)
Received: 4 October 2018 / Revised: 26 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
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Abstract
Physical activity and screen viewing are associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors, psychological wellbeing, and academic performance among children. Across the last generation, children’s physical activity and screen viewing behaviours have changed, coinciding with changes to the home and neighbourhood environment. This study aimed
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Physical activity and screen viewing are associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors, psychological wellbeing, and academic performance among children. Across the last generation, children’s physical activity and screen viewing behaviours have changed, coinciding with changes to the home and neighbourhood environment. This study aimed to qualitatively explore parents’ views on their 8–9-year-old child’s childhood and how this compares to experiences from their own childhood, with a specific focus on physical activity and screen viewing behaviours. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 51 parents (mean age = 41.2 years, range 31.5 to 51.5 years), between July and October 2016. Inductive and deductive content analyses were used to explore parents’ perceptions of their child’s physical activity and screen viewing behaviours in comparison to their own childhood behaviours. Interview data revealed that compared to the relative freedom they recalled as children, parents restrict their children’s independent mobility and outdoor play due to concerns about safety. Despite their children having greater access to structured activities than they did as children, parents feel their children are “missing out,” and perceived their own childhood as better with regards to maximising independent and outdoor play and limiting screen viewing. Innovative strategies are needed to change the social norms surrounding children’s independent mobility and outdoor play. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research)
Open AccessArticle A Comparison of Preschoolers’ Physical Activity Indoors versus Outdoors at Child Care
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2463; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112463
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
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Abstract
The aims of this study were to quantify and examine differences in preschoolers’ indoor and outdoor sedentary time and physical activity intensity at child care using GPS devices and accelerometers. We conducted an observational study of 46 children (mean age 4.5 years, 30
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The aims of this study were to quantify and examine differences in preschoolers’ indoor and outdoor sedentary time and physical activity intensity at child care using GPS devices and accelerometers. We conducted an observational study of 46 children (mean age 4.5 years, 30 boys, 16 girls) from five child care centers who wore accelerometers and GPS devices around their waists for five days during regular child care hours. GPS signal-to-noise ratios were used to determine indoor vs. outdoor location. Accelerometer data were categorized by activity intensity. Children spent, on average, 24% of child care time outdoors (range 12–37% by site), averaging 74 min daily outdoors (range 30–119 min), with 54% of children spending ≥60 min/day outdoors. Mean accelerometer activity counts were more than twice as high outdoors compared to indoors (345 (95) vs. 159 (38), (p < 0.001)), for girls and boys. Children were significantly less sedentary (51% of time vs. 75%) and engaging in more light (18% vs. 13%) and moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA) (31% vs. 12%) activity when outdoors compared to indoors (p < 0.001). To achieve a minute of MVPA, a preschooler needed to spend 9.1 min indoors vs. 3.8 min outdoors. Every additional 10 min outdoors each day was associated with a 2.9 min increase in MVPA (2.7 min for girls, 3.0 min for boys). Preschool-age children are twice as active and less sedentary when outdoors compared to indoors in child care settings. To help preschoolers achieve MVPA recommendations and likely attain other benefits, one strategy is to increase the amount of time they spend outdoors and further study how best to structure it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research)
Open AccessArticle What Protects Adolescents with Youth Subculture Affiliation from Excessive Internet Use?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2451; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112451
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 23 October 2018 / Accepted: 28 October 2018 / Published: 3 November 2018
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Abstract
Youth subculture affiliation (SA) appears to be an important risk factor with regard to adolescents’ problem behavior. Excessive Internet use (EIU) has emerged as a new type of problem behavior; however, it has not yet been studied in adolescents affiliated with youth subcultures.
[...] Read more.
Youth subculture affiliation (SA) appears to be an important risk factor with regard to adolescents’ problem behavior. Excessive Internet use (EIU) has emerged as a new type of problem behavior; however, it has not yet been studied in adolescents affiliated with youth subcultures. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the association between SA and EIU and to explore the role of selected protective factors. We used data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study conducted in 2014 in Slovakia. The final sample for this study comprised 532 adolescents (mean age: 15.4; 49.6% boys). Hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the associations of EIU with SA. Adolescents with SA were more likely to report EIU. Adjustment for protective factors decreased the association between EIU and SA. From all tested interactions, only the interaction of SA with family support was found to be significant. The relationship between family support and EIU was mediated via Monitoring by the mother only in adolescents without SA. Our findings imply that the risk of EIU is higher in adolescents with SA. There was a difference in how protective factors worked in adolescents with and without SA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research)
Open AccessArticle Self-Reported vs. Measured Height, Weight, and BMI in Young Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2216; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102216
Received: 6 September 2018 / Revised: 5 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 October 2018 / Published: 11 October 2018
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Abstract
Self-reported height and weight, if accurate, provide a simple and economical method to track changes in body weight over time. Literature suggests adults tend to under-report their own weight and that the gap between self-reported weight and actual weight increases with obesity. This
[...] Read more.
Self-reported height and weight, if accurate, provide a simple and economical method to track changes in body weight over time. Literature suggests adults tend to under-report their own weight and that the gap between self-reported weight and actual weight increases with obesity. This study investigates the extent of discrepancy in self-reported height, weight, and subsequent Body Mass Index (BMI) versus actual measurements in young adults. Physically measured and self-reported height and weight were taken from 1562 students. Male students marginally overestimated height, while females were closer to target. Males, on average, closely self-reported weight. Self-reported anthropometrics remained statistically correlated to actual measures in both sexes. Categorical variables of calculated BMI from both self-reported and actual height and weight resulted in significant agreement for both sexes. Researcher measured BMI (via anthropometric height and weight) and sex were both found to have association with self-reported weight while only sex was related to height difference. Regression examining weight difference and BMI was significant, specifically with a negative slope indicating increased BMI led to increased underestimation of weight in both sexes. This study suggests self-reported anthropometric measurements in young adults can be used to calculate BMI for weight classification purposes. Further investigation is needed to better assess self-reported vs measured height and weight discrepancies across populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research)
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Open AccessArticle Relationship between Problematic Internet Use, Sleep Problems, and Oral Health in Korean Adolescents: A National Survey
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1870; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091870
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
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Abstract
We examined the relationship between Problematic Internet Use (PIU), sleep (sleep satisfaction, sleep duration), and experience of oral disease symptoms in Korean adolescents by gender. This cross-sectional study utilized the 6th (2010) Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. Participants comprised 74,980 students from
[...] Read more.
We examined the relationship between Problematic Internet Use (PIU), sleep (sleep satisfaction, sleep duration), and experience of oral disease symptoms in Korean adolescents by gender. This cross-sectional study utilized the 6th (2010) Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. Participants comprised 74,980 students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools nationwide. Among these, 73,238 students from 799 schools (38,391 boys, 34,847 girls, aged 13–18 years) were included in the analysis (inclusion rate = 97.7%). Multiple logistic regression and analysis of moment structures (AMOS) analyses were performed to identify meaningful relationships between the three factors. The “high risk group” of problematic internet usage had increased experience of oral disease symptoms (boys: adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.63–2.28, girls: AOR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.50–2.63) compared to the general group. Boys who used the Internet for “5–6 h” had a higher risk of oral disease symptoms compared to those who used it for “less than 1 h” (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.01–1.53); however, this difference was not significant in Models II and III. For girls, the risk of 5–6 h of use (Model I: OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.40–2.04) was higher than that of the boys. In addition, the difference was significant in Models II and III for girl students who used the Internet for 5–6 h. In subgroup analysis, the high-risk group had a higher odds ratio for mild symptoms of bad breath to severe symptoms such as sore and bleeding gums. In addition, in the path analysis, PIU affected sleep and indirectly affected oral health. Direct and indirect causal relationships between the three factors were confirmed. Therefore, it is important to recognize that PIU can have a detrimental effect on mental, physical, and oral health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research)
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Open AccessArticle Early Infant Feeding of Formula or Solid Foods and Risk of Childhood Overweight or Obesity in a Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Region of Australia: A Longitudinal Cohort Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1685; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081685
Received: 16 May 2018 / Revised: 15 July 2018 / Accepted: 21 July 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
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Abstract
In southwestern Sydney the timing of introduction of formula and solids may be associated with risk of childhood overweight or obesity, and this may vary by age at breastfeeding cessation during first year. We included 346 infants from southwestern Sydney using the longitudinal
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In southwestern Sydney the timing of introduction of formula and solids may be associated with risk of childhood overweight or obesity, and this may vary by age at breastfeeding cessation during first year. We included 346 infants from southwestern Sydney using the longitudinal study for Australian children (LSAC), who at baseline were singleton, full term, and normal weight births. The outcome risk of overweight or obesity was measured at every two-year interval of children aged 0 or 1 year at baseline until they reached age 10 or 11, defined by body mass index (BMI) ≥ 85th percentile, using the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Age at introduction to formula or solids was dichotomized at four months. We used mixed effects logistic regression for performing all analyses with and without adjusting for mother’s BMI, age during pregnancy, and social disadvantage index. Missing data were estimated using multivariate normal imputation having 25 imputations. The odds of overweight or obesity were significantly higher among infants introduced to formula or solids at ≤4 months compared to those introduced at >4 months in both unadjusted (odds ratio = 2.3262, p = 0.023) and adjusted (odds ratio = 1.9543, p = 0.0475) analyses. The odds of overweight or obesity when age at formula or solids introduction was held fixed at ≤4 months, increased significantly (odds ratio = 2.0856, p = 0.0215) for children stopping breastfeeding at age ≤4 months compared to >4 months. Thus, increasing the prevalence of breast-feeding without any formula or solids to 4–6 months in southwest Sydney should be a worthwhile public health measure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research)
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