Special Issue "Nonthermal Modification of Food Structure and Functionality"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Indrawati Oey
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Food Science, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
2. Riddet Institute, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Interests: novel thermal processing; non-thermal processing; health functionality; bioactives; sustainability; mathematical modeling; engineering; consumer
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sze Ying Leong
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
1. Department of Food Science, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
2. Riddet Institute, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Interests: novel thermal processing; non-thermal processing; food microstructure; nutritional functionality of food; fingerprinting; sensory
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last two decades, there has been an increasing interest in using nonthermal processing technologies such as pulsed electric fields, high hydrostatic pressure, high pressure homogenisation, ultrasounds and many other processing techniques to modify food structure in order to create unique functionalities such as improving digestibility, increasing bioactivity, enhancing sensory properties, controlling the release of flavours or nutrients and optimising the delivery of nutrients. This research has been conducted in a wide range of food systems, e.g., fruits and vegetables, meat, seafood, cereals and grains, eggs and dairy. We are not only interested in cutting edge original research papers or comprehensive review papers discussing these new functional properties after nonthermal processing, but also welcome papers that implement or develop new and advanced experimental tools and techniques for characterisation of food functionality, e.g., microstructural analysis and metabolomics.

Looking forward to your participation in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Indrawati Oey
Dr. Sze Ying Leong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nonthermal processing
  • Pulsed electric field processing
  • High pressure processing
  • High pressure homogenization
  • Ultrasound processing
  • Food (micro)structure
  • Food texture and rheology properties
  • Microscopy and imaging analysis
  • Nutritional functionality
  • Food constituents
  • Antioxidant potentials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Pulsed Electric Fields on the Volatile Compounds Produced in Whole Onions (Allium cepa and Allium fistulosum)
Foods 2018, 7(11), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7110183 - 07 Nov 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) processing on the volatile compounds produced in onion cultivars. The changes in the volatile compounds of onions were assessed comparing results observed while measured immediately and 24 h [...] Read more.
The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) processing on the volatile compounds produced in onion cultivars. The changes in the volatile compounds of onions were assessed comparing results observed while measured immediately and 24 h after PEF treatment using headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS). Significant increases in the concentrations of propanethial S-oxide, propenyl propyl thiosulfinate, 2-methyl-2-pentenal, dipropyl disulfide, propenyl propyl disulfide, methyl propyl disulfide, and methyl propenyl disulfide were observed immediately after PEF treatment. The concentrations of propenyl propyl thiosulfinate, dipropyl disulfide, methyl propyl disulfide, dipropyl trisulfide, methyl propyl trisulfide, and propenyl propyl trisulfide increased after 24 h compared to initial concentrations. It is postulated that these changes are due to PEF-induced cell permeabilisation that facilitates enzyme-substrate reactions after the PEF treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonthermal Modification of Food Structure and Functionality)
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Open AccessArticle
A Chemometrics Approach Comparing Volatile Changes during the Shelf Life of Apple Juice Processed by Pulsed Electric Fields, High Pressure and Thermal Pasteurization
Foods 2018, 7(10), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7100169 - 17 Oct 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
High-Pressure Processing (HPP) and Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) processing technologies are being used increasingly on a commercial basis, with high-quality labelled fruit juices being one of the most important promotion strategies. Quality-related enzymes, which might still be active after HPP and PEF pasteurization, [...] Read more.
High-Pressure Processing (HPP) and Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) processing technologies are being used increasingly on a commercial basis, with high-quality labelled fruit juices being one of the most important promotion strategies. Quality-related enzymes, which might still be active after HPP and PEF pasteurization, can cause undesirable aroma changes during storage. This study investigated volatile changes during the shelf life of PEF (15.5 kV/cm and specific energy of 158 kJ/L), HPP (600 MPa for 3 min), and thermally (72 °C for 15 s) pasteurized Jazz apple juices—up to five weeks. To have an increased insight into the volatile changes, an integrated instrumental (GC-MS) and data analysis (chemometrics) approach was implemented. Immediately after pasteurization, PEF processing resulted a better retention of odor-active volatiles, such as (E)-2-hexenal and hexyl acetate, whereas thermal processing lowered their amount. During refrigerated storage, these volatiles have gradually decreased in all processed juices. By the end of storage, the amount of these aroma relevant volatiles appears to still be higher in PEF and HPP pasteurized juices compared to their conventional counterparts. This study demonstrated the potential of advanced chemometric approaches to obtain increased insight into complex shelf life changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonthermal Modification of Food Structure and Functionality)
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Review

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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceReview
Effects of Cold Plasma on Food Quality: A Review
Foods 2018, 7(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7010004 - 01 Jan 2018
Cited by 66
Abstract
Cold plasma (CP) technology has proven very effective as an alternative tool for food decontamination and shelf-life extension. The impact of CP on food quality is very crucial for its acceptance as an alternative food processing technology. Due to the non-thermal nature, CP [...] Read more.
Cold plasma (CP) technology has proven very effective as an alternative tool for food decontamination and shelf-life extension. The impact of CP on food quality is very crucial for its acceptance as an alternative food processing technology. Due to the non-thermal nature, CP treatments have shown no or minimal impacts on the physical, chemical, nutritional and sensory attributes of various products. This review also discusses the negative impacts and limitations posed by CP technology for food products. The limited studies on interactions of CP species with food components at the molecular level offers future research opportunities. It also highlights the need for optimization studies to mitigate the negative impacts on visual, chemical, nutritional and functional properties of food products. The design versatility, non-thermal, economical and environmentally friendly nature of CP offers unique advantages over traditional processing technologies. However, CP processing is still in its nascent form and needs further research to reach its potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonthermal Modification of Food Structure and Functionality)
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