Special Issue "Improvements/Innovations Related to Fruit Varieties"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Geza Bujdoso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Centre for Fruit Growing, Institute of Horticultural Sciences, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, 1223 Budapest, Park utca 2., Hungary
Interests: walnut; phenology; breeding; evaluation of varieties; genetics; orchard systems; growing technologies; evaluation of cherry rootsocks; cherry orchard systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Károly Hrotkó
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Floriculture and Dendrology, Institute of Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Garden Art, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences. H-1118 Budapest, Villányi str. 29-43, Hungary
Interests: rootstock-scion interactions; rootstock breeding and evaluation; training systems of fruit crops; propagation biology of woody plants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Miljan Cvetkovic
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Banja Luka, Bulevar vojvode Petra Bojovića 1A, 78000 Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Interests: training systems; orchard management; cultivars
Dr. Klara Cseke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Forest Research Institute, University of Sopron, Várkerület 30/A, 9600 Sárvár, Hungary
Interests: DNA fingerprinting; tree genetics; plant breeding; forest genetics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mindful breeding activity, especially in the case of woody plant species, takes a long time and might be highly expensive. Fruit production is very important; there is a fruit industry in every country, therefore the interest in lot of related research topics is shared all over the world. All participants working in the fruit sector need good varieties derived from different breeding programs to successfully increase their growing year on year. To support their activity, trials focusing on the genetic backgrounds, rootstock–scion combinations and interactions, effects on the cumulative yields, fruit/nut quality, tolerance/resistance to the diseases and pests must be performed.

This Special Issue invites breeders, climatologists, biologists, chemists, and scientists studying the evaluation of the novel bred genotypes, in situ and ex situ candidates from schools of thought, which are necessary for successful growing, to publish their original research papers, perspectives, opinions, reviews, modelling approaches and methods about their genetic and phenotypical studies, the effects of the environment and canopy on the yield, fruit/nut quality, chemical compounds, as well as adaptation strategies of the edible fruit species.

Dr. Geza Bujdoso
Prof. Dr. Karoly Hrotko
Dr. Miljan Cvetkovic
Dr. Klara Cseke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fruits
  • rootstocks
  • phenology
  • resistance/tolerance to diseases/pest
  • fruit/nut quality
  • chemical compounds
  • adaptation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Viability of Embryo Sacs and Fruit Set in Different Plum (Prunus domestica L.) Cultivars Grown under Norwegian Climatic Conditions
Plants 2022, 11(2), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11020219 - 14 Jan 2022
Viewed by 133
Abstract
Compatibility and synchrony between specialized tissues of the pistil, female gametophytes and male gametophytes, are necessary for successful pollination, fertilization, and fruit set in angiosperms. The aim of the present work was to study the development and viability of embryo sacs, as well [...] Read more.
Compatibility and synchrony between specialized tissues of the pistil, female gametophytes and male gametophytes, are necessary for successful pollination, fertilization, and fruit set in angiosperms. The aim of the present work was to study the development and viability of embryo sacs, as well as fertilization success, in relation to the fruit set of the cultivars ‘Mallard’, ‘Edda’, ‘Jubileum’, and ‘Reeves’, under specific Norwegian climatic conditions. Emasculated, unpollinated, and open-pollinated flowers were collected at the beginning of flowering, and on the 3rd, 6th, 9th, and 12th days after flowering, from all four plum cultivars over two years (2018/2019). Ovaries were dehydrated, embedded in paraffin wax, sectioned, stained, and observed under a light microscope. Results showed the existence of synchronization between successive phases in the development of the embryo sac and individual phases of flowering. All plum cultivars had higher percentages of viable embryo sacs, fertilized embryo sacs, and fruit set in 2018 than in 2019. These differences may be related to the very low temperatures during the post-full-flowering period in 2019, and to the low adaptation of some studied cultivars to unfavorable conditions. In our study, the cultivar ‘Jubileum’ showed the highest percentage of viable embryo sacs, fertilized embryo sacs, and fruit set compared to other cultivars, i.e., the best low-temperature adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improvements/Innovations Related to Fruit Varieties)
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Article
Multivariate Analysis Approaches for Dimension and Shape Discrimination of Vitis vinifera Varieties
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1528; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081528 - 26 Jul 2021
Viewed by 800
Abstract
In this study, berry dimensions and shape traits, which are important for the design of the grape processing system and the classification of 10 different grape varieties grown in same ecological conditions (‘Ata Sarısı’, ‘Barış’, ‘Dımışkı’, ‘Hatun Parmağı’, ‘Helvani’, ‘Horoz Karası’, ‘Hönüsü’, ‘İtalia’, [...] Read more.
In this study, berry dimensions and shape traits, which are important for the design of the grape processing system and the classification of 10 different grape varieties grown in same ecological conditions (‘Ata Sarısı’, ‘Barış’, ‘Dımışkı’, ‘Hatun Parmağı’, ‘Helvani’, ‘Horoz Karası’, ‘Hönüsü’, ‘İtalia’, ‘Mevlana Sarısı’, and ‘Red Globe’) were determined; differences between the varieties were identified with the use of discriminant analysis. The largest grape varieties were identified as ‘Ata Sarısı’ and ‘Red Globe’. The ‘Red Globe’ and ‘Helvani’ varieties had geometrically sphere-like shape. The ‘Barış’ variety had the lowest size averages. According to elliptic Fourier analysis, the primary source of shape variation was ellipse and sphere-looking varieties. However, shape variation was seen due to the existence of a small number of drop-like varieties. According to discriminant analysis, shape differences of the varieties were defined by two discriminant functions. Based on these discriminant functions, the greatest classification performance was achieved for ‘Mevlana Sarısı’ and ‘Dımışkı’. In scatter plots, three shape definitions (sphere, ellipse, and drop) were made for grape varieties. Cluster analysis revealed 4 sub-groups. The first sub-group included the ‘Mevlana Sarısı’ variety; the second sub-group included the ‘Hönüsü’, ‘Hatun Parmağı’, ‘Dımışkı’, and ‘Horoz Karası’ varieties; the third sub-group included the ‘Ata Sarısı’ variety; the fourth sub-group included the ‘Barış’, ‘Helvani’, ‘İtalia’, and ‘Red Globe’ varieties. The variety in the first group had a geometrically ellipse-like shape, the largest length, and the smallest width. The size data were the smallest for the second sub-group. The third sub-group, with the ellipse-like shape, had the large size data. The grape varieties the closest to the sphere were classified in the fourth group, and these varieties had the large sizes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improvements/Innovations Related to Fruit Varieties)
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Article
Morphological Characteristics of Grapevine Cultivars and Closed Contour Analysis with Elliptic Fourier Descriptors
Plants 2021, 10(7), 1350; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10071350 - 01 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1001
Abstract
Morphology is the most visible and distinct character of plant organs and is accepted as one of the most important tools for plant biologists, plant breeders and growers. A number of methods based on plant morphology are applied to discriminate in particular close [...] Read more.
Morphology is the most visible and distinct character of plant organs and is accepted as one of the most important tools for plant biologists, plant breeders and growers. A number of methods based on plant morphology are applied to discriminate in particular close cultivars. In this study, image processing analysis was used on 20 grape cultivars (“Amasya beyazı“, “Antep karası“, “Bahçeli karası”, “Çavuş“, “Cevşen“, “Crimson“, “Dimrit“, “Erenköy beyazı“, “Hafızali“, “Karaşabi“, “Kırmızı“, “İzabella (Isabella) “, “Morşabi“, “Müşgüle“, “Nuniya“, “Royal“, “Sultani çekirdeksiz (Sultanina)“, “Yalova incisi“, “Yerli beyazv“, “Yuvarlak çekirdeksiz“) to classify them. According to image processing analysis, the longest and the greatest projected area values were observed in “Antep karası“ cultivar. The “Sultani çekirdeksiz“ cultivar had the least geometric mean diameter. The greatest sphericity ratios were observed in “Yerli beyaz“, “Erenköy beyazı“ and “Amasya beyazı“ cultivars. According to principal component analysis, dimensional attributes were identified as the most significant source of variation discriminant grape cultivars from each other. Morphological differences between the cultivars were explained by sphericity and elongation variables. According to elliptic Fourier analysis (EFA) results, grape morphology largely looks like ellipse and sphere. However, there are some cultivars that look similar to a water drop. The cultivars with similar morphology were identified by a pair-wise comparison test conducted with the use of linear discriminant analysis, and they were presented in a scatter plot. According to cluster analysis, present grape cultivars were classified into seven sub-groups, which indicated great diversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improvements/Innovations Related to Fruit Varieties)
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Article
Is “Esterhazy II”, an Old Walnut Variety in the Hungarian Gene Bank, the Original Genotype?
Plants 2021, 10(5), 854; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10050854 - 23 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 437
Abstract
The old walnut (Juglans regia L.) genotype called “Esterhazy II” was well-known in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy before World War II, and it can still be found in the Austrian, German and Swiss backyard gardens today. Unfortunately, nowadays, vegetatively propagated progenies of the [...] Read more.
The old walnut (Juglans regia L.) genotype called “Esterhazy II” was well-known in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy before World War II, and it can still be found in the Austrian, German and Swiss backyard gardens today. Unfortunately, nowadays, vegetatively propagated progenies of the original “Esterhazy II” are not available anymore around the world because walnut grafting started later than this genotype had become well-known. Although various accessions with “Esterhazy II”-“blood“ are available, it is difficult to determine which one can be considered true or the most similar to the original one. In this paper, phenological and nut morphological characteristics of an “Esterhazy II” specimen planted in a Hungarian gene bank were compared to the varieties “Milotai 10” and “Chandler”. Examined characteristics were: budbreak, blossom time, type of dichogamy, ripening time, nut and kernel features. An additional SSR fingerprinting was used to identify identical genotypes and to demonstrate the relatedness of the analyzed “Esterhazy II” genotype to the other Hungarian walnut cultivars. It can be concluded that under the name “Esterhazy II”, several different genotypes can be observed. All the checked characteristics except budbreak fitted well with the previous descriptions. Our results confirmed that the examined “Esterhazy II” genotype shows high similarity to the “original“ “Esterhazy II” described in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improvements/Innovations Related to Fruit Varieties)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Is ‘Esterhazy ll’ planted in the gene bank the original genotype?
Authors: Geza Bujdoso1* – Benjamin Illes1 – Virag Varjas1– Klara Cseke2
Affiliation: 1 Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Centre for Horticultural Sciences, Budapest, Hungary 2 University of Sopron, Forest Research Institute, Sárvár, Hungary
Abstract: The historic genotype called ‘Esterhazy II’ was well-known in the Hungarian – Austria Monarchy and before the World War II and it can be found in the Austrian, German and Swiss backyard gardens today. Unfortunately, vegetative propagated progenies of the original ‘Esterhazy II’ cannot be found anywhere around the globe nowadays, because the walnut grafting started later than when this genotype became well-known. Despite many seedlings with ‘Esterhazy II’-“blood” available, it is difficult to say / determine, which one is true to the original one. In this paper phenological and DNA characteristics of an ‘Esterhazy II’ specimen, planted in the gene bank, were compared to the varieties ‘Milotai 10’ and ‘Chandler’. Characters examined were: budbreak, blossom time, type of dichogamy, ripening time, nut and kernel characteristics. SSR fingerprinting was used in order to demonstrate the relatedness of the Hungarian walnut cultivars with the ‘Esterhazy II’ genotype. The examined ‘Esterhazy II’ specimen had a lot of similar characters with data found in literature. Under the name ‘Esterhazy II’ several different genotypes can be observed. Our results confirmed that the analysed ‘Esterhazy II’ genotype seems to have a high similarity to the “original” ‘Esterhazy II’, because all checked characters fitted well to the described ones except budbreak.

Title: Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Analyses of Juglans regia L. Populations Using RAPD, ISSR Markers and Nuclear ITS Regions
Authors: Emre Sevindik1, Kemalcan Okan1, Sezai Ercisli2,, Gulce Ilhan2, Halil Ibrahim Sagbas2 and Geza Bujdoso3*
Affiliation: 1Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Adnan Menderes University, South Campus, Cakmar, Aydin, Turkey 2Ataturk University Agricultural Faculty Department of Horticulture 25240 Erzurum, Turkey 3NARIC, Research Institute for Fruit Growing and Ornamentals 1223 Budapest, Park u.2, Hungary
Abstract: In this study, genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of Turkish Juglans regia L. populations was conducted based on RAPD and ISSR-PCR and nuclear DNA ITS sequences. Fourteen populations from Aegean and Marmara region were included in the research. Twelve RAPD and thirteen ISSR primers were used for molecular characterization of the J. regia populations. For the amplification of the nrDNA ITS region, ITS4 and ITS5A primers were used in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). In RAPD- ISSR-PCR analysis, a total of 55 and 85 bands were obtained, respectively. RAPD and ISSR analyses were detected high polymorphism (74.54% and 70.57%, respectively) among J. regia populations. However, nrDNA ITS sequence analysis was not efficient in revealing the genetic relationship among J. regia samples. In addition, phylogenetic analyses including nrDNA ITS sequences of our populations and that of other Juglans taxa (Juglans hindsii, Juglans major, Juglans nigra, Juglans microcarpa, Juglans cathayensis and Juglans hopeiensis) obtained from NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) were conducted. Analysis of Juglans regia populations based on RAPD and ISSR-PCR and nrDNA ITS sequences revealed that the rate of polymorphism obtained with the ISSR-PCR approach was higher than those obtained using the ITS sequences. Genetic diversity results of these populations will contribute significantly to identification and breeding programs of walnuts.

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