Special Issue "Coffee and Caffeine Consumption for Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Raquel Abalo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Ciencias Básicas de la Salud, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), Alcorcón, 28922 Madrid, Spain
Interests: gastrointestinal motility; functional foods; cannabinoids; irritable bowel syndrome; nutraceuticals; enteric nervous system; brain–gut axis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coffee is one of the most popular and widely consumed beverages worldwide. Caffeine is present in coffee and many other beverages (tea, soft drinks) and is the most widely used central nervous system stimulant. However, caffeine and its metabolites may exert other relevant physiological effects on human health. Thus, preclinical, clinical, and epidemiologic studies on coffee, coffee derivatives, and caffeine effects on different aspects of human health are increasing. Evidence is accumulating suggesting that coffee drinking or caffeine supplementation may have a role in preventing cardiometabolic and endocrine disease, neuroinflammation, cancer, and even all-cause mortality. Other aspects are either less known or controversial, including the effects on the brain–gut axis, neurodevelopment, behavior, pain, muscle–skeletal health, skin or sexual function. Studies focusing on special populations (neonates, children, adolescents, athletes, elderly, pregnant and nonpregnant women), or interactions with other drugs and foods, are relatively scarce but of obvious interest. Other compounds present in coffee and other caffeinated food stuffs may affect caffeine´s physiological effects with a tremendous impact on health.

With the aim to offer a robust and critical updated view of the topic to the scientific community, any scientist or research group studying any aspect of coffee and caffeine effects on human health is welcome to contribute to this Special Issue entitled “Coffee and Caffeine Consumption for Human Health”. We welcome different types of manuscript submissions, including original preclinical and clinical research articles and up-to-date reviews (narrative and systematic reviews, as well as meta-analyses).

Prof. Raquel Abalo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coffee
  • Caffeine
  • Brain–gut axis
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Pain
  • Cardiometabolic health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Coffee Intake on Dyslipidemia Risk According to Genetic Variants in the ADORA Gene Family among Korean Adults
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020493 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Current evidence on the effects of coffee intake on cardiovascular diseases is not consistent, in part contributed by the genetic variability of the study subjects. While adenosine receptors (ADORAs) are involved in caffeine signaling, it remains unknown how genetic variations at the ADORA [...] Read more.
Current evidence on the effects of coffee intake on cardiovascular diseases is not consistent, in part contributed by the genetic variability of the study subjects. While adenosine receptors (ADORAs) are involved in caffeine signaling, it remains unknown how genetic variations at the ADORA loci correlate the coffee intake with cardiovascular diseases. The present study examined the associations of coffee intake with dyslipidemia risk depending on genetic variants in the ADORA gene family. The study involved a population-based cohort of 4898 Korean subjects. Consumption of more than or equal to a cup of coffee per day was associated with lower dyslipidemia risk in females carrying the ADORA2B minor allele rs2779212 (OR: 0.645, 95% CI: 0.506–0.823), but not in those with the major allele. At the ADORA2A locus, male subjects with the minor allele of rs5760423 showed instead an increased risk of dyslipidemia when consuming more than or equal to a cup of coffee per day (OR: 1.352, 95% CI: 1.014–1.802). The effect of coffee intake on dyslipidemia risk differs depending on genetic variants at the ADORA loci in a sex-specific manner. Our study suggests that a dietary guideline for coffee intake in the prevention and management of dyslipidemia ought to consider ADORA-related biomarkers carefully. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coffee and Caffeine Consumption for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Acute Caffeine Intake Enhances Mean Power Output and Bar Velocity during the Bench Press Throw in Athletes Habituated to Caffeine
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020406 - 04 Feb 2020
Abstract
Background: The main objective of the current investigation was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on power output and bar velocity during an explosive bench press throw in athletes habituated to caffeine. Methods: Twelve resistance trained individuals habituated to caffeine ingestion participated in [...] Read more.
Background: The main objective of the current investigation was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on power output and bar velocity during an explosive bench press throw in athletes habituated to caffeine. Methods: Twelve resistance trained individuals habituated to caffeine ingestion participated in a randomized double-blind experimental design. Each participant performed three identical experimental sessions 60 min after the intake of a placebo, 3, and 6 mg/kg/b.m. of caffeine. In each experimental session, the participants performed 5 sets of 2 repetitions of the bench press throw (with a load equivalent to 30% repetition maximum (RM), measured in a familiarization trial) on a Smith machine, while bar velocity and power output were registered with a rotatory encoder. Results: In comparison to the placebo, the intake of caffeine increased mean bar velocity during 5 sets of the bench press throw (1.37 ± 0.05 vs. 1.41 ± 0.05 and 1.41 ± 0.06 m/s for placebo, 3, and 6 mg/kg/b.m., respectively; p < 0.01), as well as mean power output (545 ± 117 vs. 562 ± 118 and 560 ± 107 W; p < 0.01). However, caffeine was not effective at increasing peak velocity (p = 0.09) nor peak power output (p = 0.07) during the explosive exercise. Conclusion: The acute doses of caffeine before resistance exercise may increase mean power output and mean bar velocity during the bench press throw training session in a group of habitual caffeine users. Thus, caffeine prior to ballistic exercises enhances performance during a power-specific resistance training session. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coffee and Caffeine Consumption for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Caffeine Consumption in Switzerland: Results from the First National Nutrition Survey MenuCH
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010028 - 20 Dec 2019
Abstract
Caffeine is a natural psychostimulant with a potentially positive impact on health when consumed in moderation and a negative impact at high dose (>400 mg/day). So far, no study has examined self-reported caffeine consumption in Switzerland. Our objectives were to determine (1) the [...] Read more.
Caffeine is a natural psychostimulant with a potentially positive impact on health when consumed in moderation and a negative impact at high dose (>400 mg/day). So far, no study has examined self-reported caffeine consumption in Switzerland. Our objectives were to determine (1) the caffeine consumption per adult, (2) the main sources of caffeine intake in the Swiss diet, and (3) the timing of caffeine consumption during the day. We used data from the 2014–2015 national nutrition survey menuCH (adults aged 18 to 75 years old, n = 2057, weighted n = 4,627,878), consisting of two 24-h dietary recalls. Caffeine content in consumed foods was systematically assessed using laboratory analyses in samples of Swiss caffeinated beverages, information from food composition databases, and estimations from standard recipes. Mean (±SD) daily caffeine consumption per person and percentile 95 were 191 mg/day (±129) and 426 mg/day, respectively. We observed differences in mean caffeine consumption across age groups (18–34 y: 140 mg/day; 50–64 y: 228 mg/day), linguistic regions (German-speaking: 204 mg/day; French-speaking: 170 mg/day, Italian-speaking: 136 mg/day), and smoking status (never smokers: 171 mg/day; current smokers: 228 mg/day). The three main sources of caffeine intake were 1) coffee (83% of total caffeine intake), 2) tea (9%) and 3) soft drinks (4%). Caffeine consumption was highest between 06:00 and 09:00 (29%) and the circadian rhythm slightly differed across linguistic regions and age groups. The mean caffeine consumption in the Swiss adult population was similar to that reported in neighbouring countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coffee and Caffeine Consumption for Human Health)
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