Special Issue "Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Propagation and Seeds".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sergio Ruffo Roberto
Website
Guest Editor
Agricultural Research Center, Londrina State University, Celso Garcia Cid Road, km 380, P.O. Box 10.011, Londrina ZIP 86057-970, PR, Brazil
Interests: horticulture; fruit crops; post-harvest; fruit ripening
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In horticulture, plant propagation plays an important role as the number of plants can be rapidly multiplied retaining desirable characteristics of the mother plants, and shortening the bearing age of plants. There are two primary forms of plant propagation: sexual and asexual. In nature, propagation of plants most often involves sexual reproduction, and this form is still used in several species. Over the years, horticulturists have developed asexual propagation methods that use vegetative plant parts. Innovation in plant propagation has supported breeding programs and allowed the production of high quality nursery plants with the same genetic characteristics of the mother plant, free of diseases or pests.

The purpose of this Special Issue “Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants” aims to present state-of-the-art techniques recently developed by researchers worldwide. Innovative articles on propagation of any fruit, vegetable and ornamental species are welcome in this Special Issue.

Prof. Sergio Ruffo Roberto
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • propagation methods
  • plant growth media
  • cuttings
  • seeds
  • tissue culture
  • nursery plants
  • growth regulators

Published Papers (10 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial
Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants
Horticulturae 2020, 6(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae6020023 - 09 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
There are two primary forms of plant propagation: sexual and asexual. In nature, propagation of plants most often involves sexual reproduction, and this form is still used in several species. Over the years, horticulturists have developed asexual propagation methods that use vegetative plant [...] Read more.
There are two primary forms of plant propagation: sexual and asexual. In nature, propagation of plants most often involves sexual reproduction, and this form is still used in several species. Over the years, horticulturists have developed asexual propagation methods that use vegetative plant parts. Innovation in plant propagation has supported breeding programs and allowed the production of high-quality nursery plants with the same genetic characteristics of the mother plant, and free of diseases or pests. The purpose of this Special Issue, “Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants”, was to present state-of-the-art techniques recently developed by researchers worldwide. The Special Issue has brought together some of the latest research results of new techniques in plant propagation in nine original papers, which deal with a wide range of research activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
A Susceptible Scion Reduces Rootstock Tolerance to Ralstonia solanacearum in Grafted Eggplant
Horticulturae 2019, 5(4), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5040078 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The bacterial wilt pathogen (Ralstonia solanacearum) is a highly pathogenic soil-borne bacterium that invades the vascular system of a host plant leading to plant wilting and death. In agricultural systems, tolerant rootstocks are usually used to enhance disease resistance and tolerance [...] Read more.
The bacterial wilt pathogen (Ralstonia solanacearum) is a highly pathogenic soil-borne bacterium that invades the vascular system of a host plant leading to plant wilting and death. In agricultural systems, tolerant rootstocks are usually used to enhance disease resistance and tolerance in crop plants to soil-borne pathogens. Here, two distinct eggplant cultivars with different tolerances to R. solanacearum infection, the disease-tolerant cultivar ‘S21′ and the disease-susceptible cultivar ‘Rf’, were used to investigate if scion tolerance level can affect tolerance of rootstock upon an infection of the same pathogen. Three scion/rootstock grafted combinations were considered: Rf/S21, S21/S21, and Rf/Rf. Plants that resulted from the combination Rf/S21, composed of the susceptible scion grafts, showed weak tolerance to R. solanacearum infection, and exhibited the poorest growth compared to the tolerant scion grafts (S21/S21). As expected, the combination Rf/Rf showed the lowest level of disease tolerance. Furthermore, a high level of exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) were detected in susceptible scion grafts. These factors are involved in plant growth inhibition due to blocking transport between scion and rootstock and damage of vascular tissues in the plant. A high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and active oxygen scavenging enzymes were also detected in susceptible scion grafts. Excess accumulation of these substances harms the dynamic balance in plant vascular systems. These results indicated that the use of a susceptible scion in scion/rootstock eggplant grafts contributed to a reduction in rootstock tolerance to Ralstonia solanacearum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Association of Indolebutyric Acid with Azospirillum brasilense in the Rooting of Herbaceous Blueberry Cuttings
Horticulturae 2019, 5(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5040068 - 01 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Association between auxins and plant growth-promoting bacteria can stimulate root growth and development of fruit crop nursery plants, and can be a promising biological alternative to increase the rooting of cuttings. The objective of this study was to assess the viability of producing [...] Read more.
Association between auxins and plant growth-promoting bacteria can stimulate root growth and development of fruit crop nursery plants, and can be a promising biological alternative to increase the rooting of cuttings. The objective of this study was to assess the viability of producing ‘Powderblue’ blueberry nursery plants from cuttings using different doses of indolebutyric acid (IBA) in association with Azospirillum brasilense. The following treatments were tested: 0 (control); 500 mg L−1 of IBA; 1000 mg L−1 of IBA; A. brasilense; 500 mg L−1 of IBA + A. brasilense; and 1000 mg L−1 of IBA + A. brasilense. The experimental design was completely randomized, with six treatments and four replicates, and each plot (box) consisted of 10 cuttings. The boxes were arranged in a mist chamber with an intermittent regimen controlled by a timer and solenoid valve. After 90 days, the following variables were assessed: rooted cuttings; survival of cuttings; foliar retention; sprouting; cuttings with callus; root dry mass per cutting; number of roots per cutting; and root length. It was observed that the application of IBA with the A. brasilense rhizobacteria increased the number of roots of ‘Powderblue’ blueberry cuttings, while the treatments with IBA alone and IBA 1000 mg L−1 + A. brasilense increased the root length of cuttings. However, treatments with IBA and A. brasilense had no impact on % rooted cuttings and % survival of cuttings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Open AccessArticle
In Vitro Propagation and Acclimatization of Dragon Tree (Dracaena draco)
Horticulturae 2019, 5(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5030064 - 06 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this study, an efficient in vitro procedure was developed for bud induction, rooting of developing shoots and greenhouse acclimatization of young plantlets of dragon tree (Dracaena draco). Effects of media (S1 (1 mg/L KIN and 1 mg/L NAA), S2 (3 [...] Read more.
In this study, an efficient in vitro procedure was developed for bud induction, rooting of developing shoots and greenhouse acclimatization of young plantlets of dragon tree (Dracaena draco). Effects of media (S1 (1 mg/L KIN and 1 mg/L NAA), S2 (3 mg/L KIN and 1 mg/L IAA), S3 (1 mg/L BAP and 2 mg/L IBA) and S4 (1 mg/L BAP and 1 mg/L NAA)) on shoot induction and media (R1 (0 mg/L IBA), R2 (0.5 mg/L IBA), R3 (1 mg/L IBA), and R4 (2 mg/L IBA)) on root induction were examined in order to find optimal plant hormone concentrations for efficient Dracaena draco dormant bud development and subsequent rooting. The best shoot induction and rooting media were S1 and S2, and R3 and R4, respectively. Dormant buds from one-year-old Dracaena draco plants submitted to this in vitro procedure allowed successful recovery of up to 8 individuals per explant used. In vitro grown plants were successfully acclimated in the greenhouse. The potential of this in vitro procedure for multiplication of this endangered tree is discussed in this report. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Improved Propagation and Growing Techniques for Oleander Nursery Production
Horticulturae 2019, 5(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5030055 - 01 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In the first trial, we examined rooting of stem cuttings in relation to number of nodes and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) treatment in several Nerium oleander clones grown in Sicily. In a second trial, we tested the effect of different forcing dates and shading [...] Read more.
In the first trial, we examined rooting of stem cuttings in relation to number of nodes and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) treatment in several Nerium oleander clones grown in Sicily. In a second trial, we tested the effect of different forcing dates and shading on oleander plants for gardens and natural landscapes. Three- and four-node cuttings, ranging in length from 10 to 14 cm, were significantly superior to two-node cuttings (8–10 cm long) in terms of rooting percentage and number of roots per cutting. The application of IBA improved rooting percentage and root number as compared to untreated control. Irrespective of IBA, rooting percentages ranged from 94% in clone 1 to 52% in clone 4. Shaded plants forced in October were significantly higher than those forced in November and in December. Beginning of flowering was delayed in unforced plants. Plants forced in October flowered significantly sooner (first decade of March) than unforced ones (first decade of May) and reached complete flowering almost two months earlier (last week of March).Shading had little effect on plants forced in October and in November as compared to unshaded plants in terms of start of flowering, but it slightly hastened beginning of flowering of December forced plants as compared to their unshaded counterparts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
LEDs Combined with CHO Sources and CCC Priming PLB Regeneration of Phalaenopsis
Horticulturae 2019, 5(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5020034 - 06 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Throughout this study, the objective was to determine the most effective carbohydrate (CHO) sources under different light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and the impact of chlorocholine chloride (CCC), for the in vitro regeneration of the protocom-like bodies (PLBs) in Phalaenopsis ‘Fmk02010’. We applied 15 LEDs [...] Read more.
Throughout this study, the objective was to determine the most effective carbohydrate (CHO) sources under different light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and the impact of chlorocholine chloride (CCC), for the in vitro regeneration of the protocom-like bodies (PLBs) in Phalaenopsis ‘Fmk02010’. We applied 15 LEDs combined with three CHO sources and five CCC concentrations in the study. Organogenesis of PLBs was very poor in maltose both for the number of PLBs and their fresh weight (FW) compared to media containing sucrose and trehalose. Sucrose was the best CHO source under the red-white (RW) LED for the in vitro organogenesis of PLBs (PLBs: 54.13; FW: 0.109 g), while trehalose was best under the blue-white (BW) LED (PLBs: 36.33, FW: 0.129 g). The red-blue-white (RBW)-trehalose combination generated a suitable number of PLBs (35.13) with the highest FW (0.167 g). CCC at 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mgL−1CCC had no effect on PLB formation or FW, but 10 mg L−1 reduced both. RW-sucrose, BW-trehalose, and RBW-trehalose were the best combinations for PLB organogenesis. The addition of low concentrations of CCC in the plant culture medium are unnecessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Aeroponic Cloning of Capsicum spp.
Horticulturae 2019, 5(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5020030 - 16 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Aeroponic cloning is a great strategy to maintain desired genotypes by generating a whole new plant from cuttings. While this propagation technique has been demonstrated for tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) and potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), no protocol has been developed for [...] Read more.
Aeroponic cloning is a great strategy to maintain desired genotypes by generating a whole new plant from cuttings. While this propagation technique has been demonstrated for tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) and potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), no protocol has been developed for peppers (Capsicum spp.). The ability to clonally propagate different Capsicum holds promise for domestic and industrial growing operations since elite cultivars with desirable traits (e.g., high capsaicin levels, nutrient content, and striped fruit) can be perpetuated without the need of planning a nursery. We tested six Capsicum species for their feasibility of aeroponic cloning by stem cuttings. All domestic species were successfully regenerated under aeroponic conditions but not for Capsicum eximium, a wild species. Of the species analyzed, Capsicum annuum peppers had the fastest node formation (11.6 +/− 0.89 days, P ≤ 0.01) and obtained a larger volume of roots (P ≤ 0.01) after node formation as compared to C. baccatum, C. frutescens, and C. pubescens. This study presents a cost-effective strategy to clonally propagate peppers for personal, industrial, and conservation purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Propagation from Basal Epicormic Meristems Remediates an Aging-Related Disorder in Almond Clones
Horticulturae 2019, 5(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5020028 - 11 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The asexual propagation of clonal crops has allowed cultivation of superior selections for thousands of years. With time, some clones deteriorate from genetic and epigenetic changes. Non-infectious bud-failure (NBF) in cultivated almond (Prunus dulcis) is a commercially important age-related disorder that [...] Read more.
The asexual propagation of clonal crops has allowed cultivation of superior selections for thousands of years. With time, some clones deteriorate from genetic and epigenetic changes. Non-infectious bud-failure (NBF) in cultivated almond (Prunus dulcis) is a commercially important age-related disorder that results in the failure of new vegetative buds to grow in the spring, with dieback of terminal shoots, witches-brooming of surviving buds, and deformed bark (roughbark). The incidence of NBF increases with clone age, including within individual long-lived trees as well as nursery propagation lineages. It is not associated with any infectious disease agents. Consequently, nursery practices emphasize the establishment of foundation-mother blocks utilizing propagation-wood selected from proven and well-monitored propagation-lineages. Commercial propagation utilizes axillary shoot buds through traditional budding or grafting. This study examines NBF development using basal epicormic buds from individual trees of advanced age as an alternative source of foundation stock. Results show the age-related progression of NBF is suppressed in these epicormic meristems, possibly owing to their unique origins and ontogeny. NBF development in commercial orchards propagated from foundation blocks established from these sources was similarly dramatically suppressed even over the 10- to 20-year expected commercial orchard-life. Foundation-stock stability can be further maintained through appropriate management of propagation source-trees, which requires accurate knowledge of meristem origin and development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
In Vitro Establishment of ‘Delite’ Rabbiteye Blueberry Microshoots
Horticulturae 2019, 5(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5010024 - 08 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Micropropagation is an important technique for clonal mass propagation and a tool for in vitro studies. One of the first steps to overcome in this process is the establishment of new explants in vitro. ‘Delite’ rabbiteye blueberry was cultured in vitro with four [...] Read more.
Micropropagation is an important technique for clonal mass propagation and a tool for in vitro studies. One of the first steps to overcome in this process is the establishment of new explants in vitro. ‘Delite’ rabbiteye blueberry was cultured in vitro with four cytokinins (zeatin (ZEA), 6-(γ-γ-dimethylallylamino)-purine (2iP), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), and kinetin (KIN)) at eight concentrations (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 µM). Additionally, nine combinations of nitrogen salts were tested, using Woody Plant Medium (WPM) and a modified WPM as the basic medium. ZEA and 2iP showed better responses, but ZEA was superior at lower (2.5 µM) concentrations (89.7% survival, 81.3% shoot formation, 1.3 shoots, 13.8 mm shoot length, 10.0 leaves). BAP and KIN showed very low responses. In the combinations of salts with modified WPM, no differences were observed. However, the original WPM with treatments of 0.5 × NH4NO3 and 1 × Ca(NO3)2, 0.5 × NH4NO3 and 0.5 × Ca(NO3)2, and the modified WPM alone showed the lowest rates of survival and shoot formation and the shortest shoot lengths. The highest shoot lengths were observed in treatments with the original WPM, 1.5 × NH4NO3 and 0.5 × Ca(NO3)2, and 1.5 × NH4NO3 and 1.5 × Ca(NO3)2. This initial study with ‘Delite’ can be the basis for further experiments with different combinations of salts, 2iP, and ZEA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Pecan Propagation: Seed Mass as a Reliable Tool for Seed Selection
Horticulturae 2018, 4(3), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae4030026 - 11 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Pecan is one of the most important horticultural nut crops in the world. It is a deciduous species native to the temperate zones of North America, introduced into the subtropical regions of Brazil during the 1870s. High quality seedlings are essential to establishing [...] Read more.
Pecan is one of the most important horticultural nut crops in the world. It is a deciduous species native to the temperate zones of North America, introduced into the subtropical regions of Brazil during the 1870s. High quality seedlings are essential to establishing healthy and productive orchards, and selection of seeds is an important factor in this issue. In this study we evaluated the correlation between seed mass, emergence rate and morphometric traits of seedlings in the pecan cultivar Importada. A significant positive correlation (r > 0.81) between seed mass and plantlet height, stem diameter, emergence rate and number of leaves was observed. Our results suggest that seed mass can be used as a direct method for seed selection towards production of vigorous pecan seedlings. However, since an increase in seed mass is usually associated with a decrease in the number of seeds that a plant can produce per unit canopy, long-duration studies are recommended in order to evaluate the influence of seed selection on a plantation’s production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Propagation of Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop