Special Issue "Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Djamel Drider
Website
Guest Editor
Lille University, Unit of Research BIOECOAGRO INRA 1158, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
Interests: cheese; PCR; molecular biology; genetics; microbiology; antimicrobials; food safety; food microbiology; antibacterial activity; probiotics; mycology; salmonella; lactic acid bacteria; bacteriocins; listeria monocytogenes; antimicrobial peptides; foodborne pathogens; listeria
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleauges,

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a full paper for consideration in the forthcoming Special Issue, which is expected to be published in Foods, an MDPI journal with a 3.011 Impact Factor.

The main purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together scientists with growth experience in the field of lactic acid bacteria to provide insightful information to the journal’s readers as well as to the whole LAB community. This Special Issue is anticipated to provide recent and relevant scientific advances in this aforementioned topic and should outline the remaining questions and prospects. Original papers as well as reviews with a focus on LAB in foods are welcome. Papers which highlight (i) the role of LAB in artisanal foods, (ii) novel sources of LAB and show their benefits, (iii) LAB and functional foods, (iv) LAB mediating food protection, and (v) the duality of LAB/phages and LAB will constitute the main body of this Special Issue. Academic research on LAB bacteriocins, LAB EPS, and LAB engineering are encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Djamel Drider
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lactic acid bacteria
  • food sources
  • microbiota
  • interactions
  • advances in LAB

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Potentiality of Self-Cloned Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for Enhancing GABA Production in Yogurt under Glucose Induction: Optimization and Its Cardiovascular Effect on Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1826; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121826 - 09 Dec 2020
Viewed by 392
Abstract
The current study evaluated the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producing ability from three novel strains of lactic acid bacteria (L. plantarum Taj-Apis362, assigned as UPMC90, UPMC91, and UPMC1065) co-cultured with starter culture in a yogurt. A combination of UPMC90 + UPMC91 with starter [...] Read more.
The current study evaluated the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producing ability from three novel strains of lactic acid bacteria (L. plantarum Taj-Apis362, assigned as UPMC90, UPMC91, and UPMC1065) co-cultured with starter culture in a yogurt. A combination of UPMC90 + UPMC91 with starter culture symbiotically revealed the most prominent GABA-producing effect. Response surface methodology revealed the optimized fermentation conditions at 39.0 °C, 7.25 h, and 11.5 mM glutamate substrate concentration to produce GABA-rich yogurt (29.96 mg/100 g) with desirable pH (3.93) and water-holding capacity (63.06%). At 2% glucose to replace pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP), a cofactor typically needed during GABA production, GABA content was further enhanced to 59.00 mg/100 g. In vivo study using this sample revealed a blood pressure-lowering efficacy at 0.1 mg/kg GABA dosage (equivalent to 30 mg/kg GABA-rich yogurt) in spontaneously hypertensive rats. An improved method to produce GABA-rich yogurt has been established, involving shorter fermentation time and lower glutamate concentration than previous work, along with glucose induction that omits the use of costly PLP, fostering the potential of developing a GABA-rich functional dairy product through natural fermentation with desirable product quality and antihypertensive property. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
The Biotechnological Potential of Pediococcus spp. Isolated from Kombucha Microbial Consortium
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1780; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121780 - 01 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 470
Abstract
In the past decade, the probiotic market has grown rapidly, both for foods and supplements intended to enhance wellness in healthy individuals. Different lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially Lactobacillus spp., of different origins have already been used to develop commercial probiotic products. Nowadays, [...] Read more.
In the past decade, the probiotic market has grown rapidly, both for foods and supplements intended to enhance wellness in healthy individuals. Different lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially Lactobacillus spp., of different origins have already been used to develop commercial probiotic products. Nowadays, LAB new alternative sources, such as non-dairy fermented food products, are being exploited. One such source is Kombucha, a fermented low-alcohol beverage made of tea leaves. In this regard, we tested seven Pediococcus spp. strains isolated from a local industrial Kombucha for their biotechnological potential. Two, out of the seven isolates, identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus (L3) and Pediococcus acidiliactici (L5), were selected as successful candidates for the food industry, due to their probiotic and technological properties. In regard to their resistance in the gastro-intestinal tract, both selected strains were tolerant to a pH of 3.5, presence of 0.3% pepsin, and 0.5% bile salt concentration. On the antagonistic side, the fresh suspension of selected isolates had high inhibitory activity against pathogenic bacteria, such as Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii, Bacillus cereus, Proteus hauseri, and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, moderate to high inhibitory activity was noticed against foodborne molds (e.g., Penicillium expansum and Penicillium digitatum). These safety issues were supported by their negative hemolytic activity and good antioxidant potential (56–58%). Selected isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin, erythromycin, and lincomycin, while a broad range of other antibiotics were not effective inhibitors. On the technological side, both strains tolerated 5% NaCl and, during the freeze-drying process, had a good survival rate (86–92%). The selected Pediococcus strains have proven properties to be used for further development of functional products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of High-Ornithine-Producing Weissella koreensis DB1 Isolated from Kimchi and Its Application in Rice Bran Fermentation as a Starter Culture
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1545; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111545 - 26 Oct 2020
Viewed by 499
Abstract
High-ornithine-producing Weissella koreensis DB1 were isolated from kimchi. Ornithine is produced from arginine via the intracellular arginine deiminase pathway in microorganisms; thus, high cell growth is important for producing ornithine in large quantities. In this study, excellent W. koreensis DB1 growth (A600 [...] Read more.
High-ornithine-producing Weissella koreensis DB1 were isolated from kimchi. Ornithine is produced from arginine via the intracellular arginine deiminase pathway in microorganisms; thus, high cell growth is important for producing ornithine in large quantities. In this study, excellent W. koreensis DB1 growth (A600: 5.15–5.39) was achieved in de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) medium supplemented with 1.0–3.0% arginine (pH 5.0) over 24–48 h at 30 °C, and the highest ornithine (15,059.65 mg/L) yield was obtained by culture in MRS containing 3.0% arginine for 48 h. W. koreensis DB1 was further investigated as a functional starter culture for rice bran fermentation. After 48 h of fermentation at 30 °C, the fermented rice bran was freeze-dried and ground. The prepared fermented rice bran contained 43,074.13 mg/kg of ornithine and 27,336.37 mg/kg of citrulline, which are used as healthcare supplements due to their beneficial effects. Furthermore, the organoleptic quality of the fermented rice bran was significantly improved, and the fermented product contained viable cells (8.65 log CFU/mL) and abundant dietary fiber. In addition, an investigation of its safety status showed that it has no harmful characteristics. These results indicate that the fermented rice bran product produced is a promising functional food candidate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
Selection of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Based on Their Antimicrobial and Enzymatic Activities
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1399; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101399 - 02 Oct 2020
Viewed by 959
Abstract
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are an important source of bioactive metabolites and enzymes. LAB isolates from fresh vegetable sources were evaluated to determine their antimicrobial, enzymatic, and adhesion activities. A saline solution from the rinse of each sample was inoculated in De Man, [...] Read more.
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are an important source of bioactive metabolites and enzymes. LAB isolates from fresh vegetable sources were evaluated to determine their antimicrobial, enzymatic, and adhesion activities. A saline solution from the rinse of each sample was inoculated in De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe Agar (MRS Agar) for isolates recovery. Antimicrobial activity of cell-free supernatants from presumptive LAB isolates was evaluated by microtitration against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, LAB, mold, and yeast strains. Protease, lipase, amylase, citrate metabolism and adhesion activities were also evaluated. Data were grouped using cluster analysis, with 85% of similarity. A total of 76 LAB isolates were recovered, and 13 clusters were formed based on growth inhibition of the tested microorganisms. One cluster had antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, molds and yeasts. Several LAB strains, PIM4, ELO8, PIM5 and CAL14 strongly inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes and JAV15 and TOV9 strongly inhibited the growth of F. oxysporum. Based on enzymatic activities, 5 clusters were formed. Seven isolates hydrolyzed starch, 46 proteins, 14 lipids, and 36 metabolized citrate. LAB isolates with the best activities were molecularly identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Enterococcus mundtii and Enterococcus faecium. Overall, LAB isolated from vegetables showed potential technological applications and should be further evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
A Novel Weissella cibaria Strain UTNGt21O Isolated from Wild Solanum quitoense Fruit: Genome Sequence and Characterization of a Peptide with Highly Inhibitory Potential toward Gram-Negative Bacteria
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1242; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091242 - 05 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 594
Abstract
A novel Weissella cibaria strain UTNGt21O from the fruit of the Solanum quitoense (naranjilla) shrub produces a peptide that inhibits the growth of both Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica ATCC51741 and Escherichia coli ATCC25922 at different stages. A total of 31 contigs were assembled, [...] Read more.
A novel Weissella cibaria strain UTNGt21O from the fruit of the Solanum quitoense (naranjilla) shrub produces a peptide that inhibits the growth of both Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica ATCC51741 and Escherichia coli ATCC25922 at different stages. A total of 31 contigs were assembled, with a total length of 1,924,087 bases, 20 contig hits match the core genome of different groups within Weissella, while for 11 contigs no match was found in the database. The GT content was 39.53% and the genome repeats sequences constitute around 186,760 bases of the assembly. The UTNGt21O matches the W. cibaria genome with 83% identity and no gaps (0). The sequencing data were deposited in the NCBI Database (BioProject accessions: PRJNA639289). The antibacterial activity and interaction mechanism of the peptide UTNGt21O on target bacteria were investigated by analyzing the growth, integrity, and morphology of the bacterial cells following treatment with different concentrations (1×, 1.5× and 2× MIC) of the peptide applied alone or in combination with chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at 20 mM. The results indicated a bacteriolytic effect at both early and late target growth at 3 h of incubation and total cell death at 6 h when EDTA was co-inoculated with the peptide. Based on BAGEL 4 (Bacteriocin Genome Mining Tool) a putative bacteriocin having 33.4% sequence similarity to enterolysin A was detected within the contig 12. The interaction between the peptide UTNGt21O and the target strains caused permeability in a dose-, time- response manner, with Salmonella (3200 AU/mL) more susceptible than E. coli (6400 AU/mL). The results indicated that UTNGt21O may damage the integrity of the cell target, leading to release of cytoplasmic components followed by cell death. Differences in membrane shape changes in target cells treated with different doses of peptide were observed by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). Spheroplasts with spherical shapes were detected in Salmonella while larger shaped spheroplasts with thicker and deformed membranes along with filamentous cells were observed in E. coli upon the treatment with the UTNGt21O peptide. These results indicate the promising potential of the putative bacteriocin released by the novel W. cibaria strain UTNGt21O to be further tested as a new antimicrobial substance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
Do Your Kids Get What You Paid for? Evaluation of Commercially Available Probiotic Products Intended for Children in the Republic of the Philippines and the Republic of Korea
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1229; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091229 - 03 Sep 2020
Viewed by 848
Abstract
A wide range of probiotic products is available on the market and can be easily purchased over the counter and unlike pharmaceutical drugs, their commercial distribution is not strictly regulated. In this study, ten probiotic preparations commercially available for children’s consumption in the [...] Read more.
A wide range of probiotic products is available on the market and can be easily purchased over the counter and unlike pharmaceutical drugs, their commercial distribution is not strictly regulated. In this study, ten probiotic preparations commercially available for children’s consumption in the Republic of the Philippines (PH) and the Republic of Korea (SK) have been investigated. The analyses included determination of viable counts and taxonomic identification of the bacterial species present in each formulation. The status of each product was assessed by comparing the results with information and claims provided on the label. In addition to their molecular identification, safety assessment of the isolated strains was conducted by testing for hemolysis, biogenic amine production and antibiotic resistance. One out of the ten products contained lower viable numbers of recovered microorganisms than claimed on the label. Enterococcus strains, although not mentioned on the label, were isolated from four products. Some of these isolates produced biogenic amines and were resistant to one or several antibiotics. Metagenomic analyses of two products revealed that one product did not contain most of the microorganisms declared in its specification. The study demonstrated that some commercial probiotic products for children did not match their label claims. Infants and young children belong to the most vulnerable members of society, and food supplements including probiotics destined for this consumer group require careful checking and strict regulation before commercial distribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessCommunication
Changes in the Bacterial Diversity of Human Milk during Late Lactation Period (Weeks 21 to 48)
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1184; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091184 - 27 Aug 2020
Viewed by 547
Abstract
Breast milk from a single mother was collected during a 28-week lactation period. Bacterial diversity was studied by amplicon sequencing analysis of the V3-V4 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were the main phyla detected in the milk samples, [...] Read more.
Breast milk from a single mother was collected during a 28-week lactation period. Bacterial diversity was studied by amplicon sequencing analysis of the V3-V4 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were the main phyla detected in the milk samples, followed by Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The proportion of Firmicutes to Proteobacteria changed considerably depending on the sampling week. A total of 411 genera or higher taxons were detected in the set of samples. Genus Streptococcus was detected during the 28-week sampling period, at relative abundances between 2.0% and 68.8%, and it was the most abundant group in 14 of the samples. Carnobacterium and Lactobacillus had low relative abundances. At the genus level, bacterial diversity changed considerably at certain weeks within the studied period. The weeks or periods with lowest relative abundance of Streptococcus had more diverse bacterial compositions including genera belonging to Proteobacteria that were poorly represented in the rest of the samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
Clusters of Lactobacillus Strains from Vegetal Origins Are Associated with Beneficial Functions: Experimental Data and Statistical Interpretations
Foods 2020, 9(8), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9080985 - 24 Jul 2020
Viewed by 865
Abstract
Nine strains of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum and one strain of Lacticaseibacillus paracasei that were recently isolated from prickly pears, fresh figs and blackberries, which are traditionally and largely consumed fruits in Kabylia (north of Algeria), were studied here for their antagonism and antioxidant properties [...] Read more.
Nine strains of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum and one strain of Lacticaseibacillus paracasei that were recently isolated from prickly pears, fresh figs and blackberries, which are traditionally and largely consumed fruits in Kabylia (north of Algeria), were studied here for their antagonism and antioxidant properties as well as for production of exopolysaccharides. With respect to their inhibitory properties, these strains were tested against three food representative pathogens including Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Staphylococcus aureus 2S6 and Listeria monocytogenes 162. The antagonism of these pathogens was attributable to lactic acid production, present in the cell free supernatant, at concentrations ranging from 9 to 16.74 g/L. The anti-adhesive properties observed on polystyrene or eukaryotic Caco-2 cells were exerted in a strain dependent-manner. Indeed, the scores obtained ranged from 27% to 75% for S. aureus 2S6, 54% to 95% for L. monocytogenes 162, and 50% to 97% for E. coli ATCC 8739. The co-aggregation of these Lactobacillus strains with the aforementioned target bacteria appeared to be exerted in a strain-dependent manner, with noticeably the upmost rate for Lb. paracasei FB1 on S. aureus 2S6. Interestingly, these novel Lactobacillus strains were able to produce a large amount (315.55 to 483.22 mg/L) of exopolysaccharides, and showed a significant scavenging activity on the 2,2-di-phényl-2-picrylhydrazyle (DPPH) synthetic free radical with rates of 51% to 56%. Of note, the highest antioxidant activity was observed for Lb. paracasei FB1 using the culture supernatants, intact cells or the intracellular extract. The statistical analysis of these data using the principal component analysis (ACP) enabled us to establish three distinct clusters with potential applications as bioprotective and/or probiotic agents, following further evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
Lactococcus lactis Diversity Revealed by Targeted Amplicon Sequencing of purR Gene, Metabolic Comparisons and Antimicrobial Properties in an Undefined Mixed Starter Culture Used for Soft-Cheese Manufacture
Foods 2020, 9(5), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050622 - 13 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 767
Abstract
The undefined mixed starter culture (UMSC) is used in the manufacture of cheeses. Deciphering UMSC microbial diversity is important to optimize industrial processes. The UMSC was studied using culture-dependent and culture-independent based methods. MALDI-TOF MS enabled identification of species primarily from the Lactococcus [...] Read more.
The undefined mixed starter culture (UMSC) is used in the manufacture of cheeses. Deciphering UMSC microbial diversity is important to optimize industrial processes. The UMSC was studied using culture-dependent and culture-independent based methods. MALDI-TOF MS enabled identification of species primarily from the Lactococcus genus. Comparisons of carbohydrate metabolism profiles allowed to discriminate five phenotypes of Lactococcus (n = 26/1616). The 16S sequences analysis (V1–V3, V3–V4 regions) clustered the UMSC microbial diversity into two Lactococcus operational taxonomic units (OTUs). These clustering results were improved with the DADA2 algorithm on the housekeeping purR sequences. Five L. lactis variants were detected among the UMSC. The whole-genome sequencing of six isolates allowed for the identification of the lactis subspecies using Illumina® (n = 5) and Pacbio® (n = 1) technologies. Kegg analysis confirmed the L. lactis species-specific niche adaptations and highlighted a progressive gene pseudogenization. Then, agar spot tests and agar well diffusion assays were used to assess UMSC antimicrobial activities. Of note, isolate supernatants (n = 34/1616) were shown to inhibit the growth of Salmonella ser. Typhimurium CIP 104115, Lactobacillus sakei CIP 104494, Staphylococcus aureus DSMZ 13661, Enterococcus faecalis CIP103015 and Listeria innocua CIP 80.11. Collectively, these results provide insightful information about UMSC L. lactis diversity and revealed a potential application as a bio-protective starter culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
High-Throughput 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing of Butter Microbiota Reveals a Variety of Opportunistic Pathogens
Foods 2020, 9(5), 608; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050608 - 09 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1904
Abstract
Microbial contamination of dairy products with a high fat content (e.g., butter) has been studied insufficiently. No studies using modern molecular methods to investigate microbial communities in butter have been conducted so far. In this work, we used high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing [...] Read more.
Microbial contamination of dairy products with a high fat content (e.g., butter) has been studied insufficiently. No studies using modern molecular methods to investigate microbial communities in butter have been conducted so far. In this work, we used high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing of individual bacterial colonies to analyze microbial content of commercially available butter brands. A total of 21 samples of commercially available butter brands were analyzed. We identified a total of 94 amplicon sequence variants corresponding to different microbial taxa. The most abundant lactic acid bacteria in butter were Lactobacillus kefiri, Lactobacillus parakefiri, Lactococcus taiwanensis and Lactococcus raffinolactis. A large amount of Streptococcus spp. bacteria (87.9% of all identified bacteria) was found in one of the butter samples. Opportunistic pathogens such as Bacillus cereus group, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cronobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, Citrobacter spp., Enterococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumonia were detected. The analyzed butter samples were most strongly contaminated with bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group, and to a lesser extent - with Cronobacter spp. and Enterococcus spp. The plating and Sanger sequencing of individual colonies revealed the presence of Enterobacter cloacae and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The Sanger sequencing also showed the presence of Cronobacter sakazakii in butter which can be dangerous for children under the age of 1 year. We demonstrated that butter is a good growth medium for opportunistic pathogenic bacteria. Our data indicate that despite the fact that butter is a dairy product with a long shelf life, it should be subjected to quality control for the presence of opportunistic bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Open AccessArticle
Lyophilized Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria Viability in Potato Chips and Its Impact on Oil Oxidation
Foods 2020, 9(5), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050586 - 05 May 2020
Viewed by 880
Abstract
To produce a new probiotic-containing food product, potato chips, as the most preferred fast food, were chosen. Preferably, it should be preserved for a long period without oxidation. The presented study aimed to compare potato chips containing two lyophilized probiotic lactic acid bacteria [...] Read more.
To produce a new probiotic-containing food product, potato chips, as the most preferred fast food, were chosen. Preferably, it should be preserved for a long period without oxidation. The presented study aimed to compare potato chips containing two lyophilized probiotic lactic acid bacteria (Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15708 and Lactobacillus helveticus LH-B02) in order to retard lipid oxidation. Lyophilization of probiotics was carried out into two cryoprotective media—skim milk (SM) and gelatin/glycerol (GG) as lactose-free medium. Results revealed that GG and SM media were the most suitable for lyophilization of B. longum and L. helveticus, respectively. The lyophilized live cells were incorporated in potato chips, packed and their effect on oil oxidation was assessed. Results showed that the lyophilized B. longum in SM remained alive at 6.5 log CFU/g for 4 months at 30 °C. Interestingly, potato chip bags containing B. longum lyophilized in SM medium exhibited a decrease in peroxide value (PV) and acid value (AV) of the extracted oil by 40.13% and 25%, respectively, compared to the control bags. The created probiotic potato chips containing B. longum fulfill the criteria of the probiotic product besides the prime quality and sensory attributes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Allergenicity of Fermented Foods: Emphasis on Seeds Protein-Based Products
Foods 2020, 9(6), 792; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060792 - 16 Jun 2020
Viewed by 1103
Abstract
Food allergy is an IgE-mediated abnormal response to otherwise harmless food proteins, affecting between 5% and 10% of the world preschool children population and 1% to 5% adults. Several physical, chemical, and biotechnological approaches have been used to reduce the allergenicity of food [...] Read more.
Food allergy is an IgE-mediated abnormal response to otherwise harmless food proteins, affecting between 5% and 10% of the world preschool children population and 1% to 5% adults. Several physical, chemical, and biotechnological approaches have been used to reduce the allergenicity of food allergens. Fermentation processes that contribute to technological and desirable changes in taste, flavor, digestibility, and texture of food products constitute one of these approaches. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), used as starter cultures in dairy products, are a subject of increasing interest in fermentation of plant proteins. However, the studies designed to assess the impact of LAB on reduction of allergenicity of seed proteins are at an early stage. This review presents the current knowledge on food fermentation, with a focus on seed proteins that are increasingly used as ingredients, and its impacts on food potential allergenicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Field)
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