Health Beneficial Effects of Plant Beverages: From In Vitro to In Vivo Evidence

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710). This special issue belongs to the section "Quality, Nutrition, and Chemistry of Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 24617

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Nutrition and Food Science Area, University of Valencia, Avda. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n 46100, Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
Interests: functional foods; bioactive compounds; sterols; oxysterols; phytochemicals; bioaccessibility; bioavailability; human milk; infant foods; microbiota; lipid oxidation; food chemistry; gas chromatography; clinical trials
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Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, University of Valencia, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food fermentations; nonconventional yeasts; aroma; nutrition; health
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Food Technology Area, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences, University of Valencia, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food fermentation; health; nutrition; filamentous fungi; antifungal proteins; mycotoxins; food sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-alcoholic, non-dairy, plant-based beverages, such as fruit-, vegetable-, legume-, and cereal-based beverages, and coffee or tea, among others, comprise a growing segment of functional foods development worldwide. They stand out for a wide range of bioactive compounds comprising polyphenols, carotenoids, plant sterols, glucosinolates, and antioxidant vitamins with potential health benefits. New and advanced non-thermal processing technologies as well as fermentation may better preserve and even improve aspects of bioaccessibility and bioavailability in such beverages, which are important steps for their bioactivity. Thus, concerted efforts in applied research in functional beverages is required in coming years to prepare tailor-made plant beverages with proven health-promoting effects. For this purpose, it is important to consider the evidence provided by mechanistic in vitro (test tube and pre-clinical models in cell cultures) and confirmatory in vivo (considering animal models and gold-standard human clinical trials) assays.

This Special Issue is intended to provide updated information through research papers and high-quality reviews on all aspects of the in vitro or in vivo biological activities of plant beverages in the fields of antioxidant and anti-inflammation activity, cancer prevention, and reduced occurrence of heart disease, neurodegenerative disease, and Alzheimer's disease, etc.

Dr. Antonio Cilla
Dr. Guadalupe Garcia-Llatas
Dr. Amparo Gamero
Dr. Mónica Gandía
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vegetable beverages
  • fermentation
  • emerging food processing technologies
  • functional food
  • biological activity
  • bioactive compounds
  • health benefits
  • pre-clinical studies
  • human trials
  • disease prevention

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1287 KiB  
Article
Fruit Juice Consumption, Body Mass Index, and Adolescent Diet Quality in a Biracial Cohort
by Lynn L. Moore, Xinyi Zhou, Li Wan, Martha R. Singer, M. Loring Bradlee and Stephen R. Daniels
Beverages 2023, 9(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9020042 - 8 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 11031
Abstract
Fruit juice consumption during childhood remains controversial. Here, we evaluated the association between preadolescent 100% fruit juice intake and later adolescent diet quality and body mass index (BMI). We used prospective data over 10 years from the National Growth and Health Study for [...] Read more.
Fruit juice consumption during childhood remains controversial. Here, we evaluated the association between preadolescent 100% fruit juice intake and later adolescent diet quality and body mass index (BMI). We used prospective data over 10 years from the National Growth and Health Study for 1921 black and white girls, ages 9–10 years at baseline, for analyses of diet quality, and 2165 girls for BMI analyses. Statistical analyses included repeated measures analysis of variance and logistic regression models. Girls who drank ≥1.0 cup/day of fruit juice in preadolescence consumed 0.44 cup/day more total fruit in later adolescence than non-juice-drinking girls (p < 0.0001). White and black girls who drank ≥1.25 cups/day in preadolescence were 2.62 (95% CI: 1.35–5.08) and 2.54 (1.27–5.07) times more likely, respectively, to meet the Dietary Guidelines for whole fruit by later adolescence than those with the lowest juice intakes. Further, fruit juice consumption was positively associated with diet quality scores. Overall, girls consuming ≥1.25 cups/day of juice had a BMI in late adolescence that was 1.7 kg/m2 lower than that of non-juice-drinking girls. In conclusion, early adolescent fruit juice intake was positively associated with subsequent whole fruit consumption, better diet quality, and lower BMI in later adolescence. Full article
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18 pages, 2229 KiB  
Article
Bioactive Compounds in Different Coffee Beverages for Quality and Sustainability Assessment
by Laura Gobbi, Lucia Maddaloni, Sabrina Antonia Prencipe and Giuliana Vinci
Beverages 2023, 9(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9010003 - 5 Jan 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4085
Abstract
Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide, mainly due to its organoleptic, and psychoactive properties. Coffee brewing techniques involve the use of different extraction/infusion conditions (i.e., time, temperature, pressure, water/powder ratio, etc.), which can influence the quality of the final [...] Read more.
Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide, mainly due to its organoleptic, and psychoactive properties. Coffee brewing techniques involve the use of different extraction/infusion conditions (i.e., time, temperature, pressure, water/powder ratio, etc.), which can influence the quality of the final product. The study aimed to analyze the effect of four brewing coffee techniques (industrial espresso machine, Moka machine, pod machine, and capsule machine), which are the most used coffee brewing methods in Italy, on the quality and safety of the coffee brews, taking into account the profile of biogenic amines (BAs), total polyphenol content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and anti-radical activity (DPPH and ABTS assay). Eight coffee powders and brewed beverages from two different brands belonging to the 100% Arabica variety (country of origin Brazil) were analysed. The brewing techniques all resulted in a reduction of both BA content (27–30%), TPC (55–60%), TFC (50–55%), and anti-radical assays (45–50%) in coffee beverages compared to ground coffee samples. The study also showed that Moka is the method that yields the highest TPC (2.71–3.52 mg GAE/g coffee powder) and TFC (8.50–8.60 mg RUT/g coffee powder) content and highest anti-radical capacity in coffee beverages. The multivariate statistical analysis revealed a difference between coffee powder and infusions and coffee infusions obtained by different extraction techniques. Moreover, an analysis of the environmental impacts related to the different coffee preparation methods examined was conducted. This was performed by applying the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology through SimaPro v.9.2.2. software. Full article
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13 pages, 2736 KiB  
Article
From Herbal Teabag to Infusion—Impact of Brewing on Polyphenols and Antioxidant Capacity
by Quan V. Vuong, Hong Ngoc Thuy Pham and Christopher Negus
Beverages 2022, 8(4), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8040081 - 8 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3123
Abstract
Herbal teas, which are a rich and diverse source of polyphenols, have been widely consumed due to their association with various health benefits. Preparation techniques can significantly affect the level of polyphenols in a cup of tea. Thus, this study investigated the impact [...] Read more.
Herbal teas, which are a rich and diverse source of polyphenols, have been widely consumed due to their association with various health benefits. Preparation techniques can significantly affect the level of polyphenols in a cup of tea. Thus, this study investigated the impact of different preparation techniques, including brewing time in hot water, microwave-assisted extraction with cold and hot water (cold and hot MAE) for both radiation time and power, and laboratory testing condition on extractability of polyphenols in infusion from a teabag. The results showed that brewing time using hot water significantly affected the extractability of polyphenols and antioxidant activity. Cold and hot MAE conditions also significantly affected the extractability of polyphenols and antioxidant activity from a teabag infusion. Hot brewing at 7 min and cold MAE at full power with second boiled (1.93 min on and 1 min off radiation) are recommended for the preparation of herbal tea from a teabag, as these conditions had comparable extractability of polyphenols and antioxidant activity in comparison with other preparation techniques. There are over 20 major chromatogram peaks, of which 7 were identified as gallic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, epicatechin gallate, quercetin, and kaempferol, revealing potential health benefits of this herbal tea. Full article
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14 pages, 3716 KiB  
Article
Enhancing the Antioxidant Ability of Momordica grosvenorii Saponin to Resist Gastrointestinal Stresses via Microcapsules of Sodium Alginate and Chitosan and Its Application in Beverage
by Lu Liu, Yiqi Wang, Huaping Xie, Bo Zhang and Bolin Zhang
Beverages 2022, 8(4), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8040070 - 3 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1998
Abstract
Momordica grosvenorii saponin (MGS), as a promising dietary supplement with remarkable biological properties, has poor stability under acidic conditions and thus hinders its application in functional foods. In this study, capsules of chitosan and sodium alginate were successfully prepared to enhance the stability [...] Read more.
Momordica grosvenorii saponin (MGS), as a promising dietary supplement with remarkable biological properties, has poor stability under acidic conditions and thus hinders its application in functional foods. In this study, capsules of chitosan and sodium alginate were successfully prepared to enhance the stability of MGS. The optimized parameters for preparing MGS capsules were established. Sodium alginate of 20.8 mg/mL and triplication of MGS powder were added to chitosan of 4 mg/mL and calcium chloride of 10 mg/mL at a volume ratio of 3:1, stirring at 1000 r/min for 30 min to form the capsules. In this case, the fresh particles averaged 1687 μm with an encapsulation efficiency (EE) of 80.25% MGS. The capsule tolerated acidic environments better, and in vitro MGS could be controlled to release in a stimulated gastrointestinal tract system. The antioxidant activity and delayed release of MGS could be achieved by microencapsulation of chitosan/sodium alginate. Moreover, one drink containing 19 mg/mL MGS was successfully developed for the fruit. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 665 KiB  
Review
Exploring the Potential of Rice, Tiger Nut and Carob for the Development of Fermented Beverages in Spain: A Comprehensive Review on the Production Methodologies Worldwide
by Matteo Vitali, Mónica Gandía, Guadalupe Garcia-Llatas, Juan Antonio Tamayo-Ramos, Antonio Cilla and Amparo Gamero
Beverages 2023, 9(2), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9020047 - 2 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3333
Abstract
Rice, tiger nut and carob are Mediterranean products suitable for developing new foods, such as fermented beverages, due to their nutritional properties. These crops have a high carbohydrate content, are gluten and lactose-free and have a low allergenicity index. The development of fermented [...] Read more.
Rice, tiger nut and carob are Mediterranean products suitable for developing new foods, such as fermented beverages, due to their nutritional properties. These crops have a high carbohydrate content, are gluten and lactose-free and have a low allergenicity index. The development of fermented beverages from these crops can contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals by promoting human health and sustainable production and consumption. A narrative review of the nutritional value and potential functional activity of fermented beverages made from these crops was carried out. This literature review of existing studies on fermented and non-fermented beverages highlights their composition, production methodology, and health benefits. Fermented beverages made from these crops are high in fiber, essential fatty acids, vitamins (group B), and minerals. Fermentation increases the bioaccessibility of these nutrients while decreasing possible anti-nutritional factors. These fermented beverages offer several health benefits due to their antioxidant effects, modulating the intestinal microbiota and reducing the incidence of chronic degenerative diseases such as metabolic syndrome. Therefore, fermented rice, tiger nut and carob beverages can improve the Spanish diet by offering improved nutritional value and beneficial health effects. Additionally, these local crops promote sustainability, making them an appropriate choice for developing new fermented beverages. Full article
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