Special Issue "Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability"

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Amparo Gamero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, University of Valencia, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food fermentations; nonconventional yeasts; aroma; nutrition; health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mónica Gandía
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, University of Valencia, 46100 Valencia, Spain
Interests: fungi; synthetic biology; antifungal proteins; peptides; fungal cell factories
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermented foods have been part of the human diet for centuries and are a natural strategy for both food diversification and preservation. Through fermentation, it is possible to obtain different types of food products with highly valued organoleptic characteristics, such as better aroma, taste, or texture, while simultaneously improving sanitary quality and extending shelf life. In addition, recent research studies have focused on food fermentations as a natural strategy to enhance the nutritional and functional value of the resulting products, thus contributing to human health. For instance, microorganisms participating in fermentation processes can synthesize nutrients or bioactive compounds as well as increase their bioaccessibility and bioavailability, or they can increase the digestibility of foodstuffs.

On the other hand, fermentations are a very sustainable alternative for food production, as they consume little energy and generate little waste. At the same time, fermentative processes can be applied to reduce waste by-products generated from other food industry processes which, when fermented, can be useful for human nutrition or in other fields.

The main objective of this Special Issue is to publish recent research and reviews in the field of food fermentation for healthy nutrition that benefits consumers, improves their health, and contributes to sustainable development.

All proposals in this field will be reviewed and evaluated for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. Amparo Gamero Lluna
Prof. Dr. Mónica Gandía
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food fermentation
  • nutrition
  • health
  • sustainability
  • microorganisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Indigenous Yeast, Lactic Acid Bacteria, and Acetic Acid Bacteria from Cocoa Bean Fermentation in Indonesia Can Inhibit Fungal-Growth-Producing Mycotoxins
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030192 - 14 Sep 2021
Viewed by 470
Abstract
Cocoa bean fermentation is an important process in the manufacturing of cocoa products. It involves microbes, such as lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and acetic acid bacteria. The presence of mold in cocoa bean fermentation is undesired, as it reduces the quality and may [...] Read more.
Cocoa bean fermentation is an important process in the manufacturing of cocoa products. It involves microbes, such as lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and acetic acid bacteria. The presence of mold in cocoa bean fermentation is undesired, as it reduces the quality and may produce mycotoxins, which can cause poisoning and death. Aspergillus niger is a fungus that produces ochratoxin A, which is often found in dried agricultural products such as seeds and cereals. In this study, we applied indigenous Candida famata HY-37, Lactobacillus plantarum HL-15, and Acetobacter spp. HA-37 as starter cultures for cocoa bean fermentation. We found that the use of L. plantarum HL-15 individually or in combination Candida famata HY-37, Lactobacillus plantarum HL-15, and Acetobacter spp. HA-37 as a starter for cocoa bean fermentation can inhibit the growth of A. niger YAC-9 and the synthesis of ochratoxin A during fermentation and drying. With biological methods that use indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum HL-15 individually or in combination with Candida famata HY-37 and Acetobacter spp. HA-37, we successfully inhibited contamination by ochratoxin-A-producing fungi. Thus, the three indigenous microbes should be used in cocoa bean fermentation to inhibit the growth of fungi that produce mycotoxins and thus improve the quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
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Article
Nutritionally Enhanced Probioticated Whole Pineapple Juice
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030178 - 04 Sep 2021
Viewed by 559
Abstract
Nutritionally enhanced probioticated whole pineapple juice (WPJ, comprising juice of pineapple pulp and peel) beverages were produced by fermentation of WPJ with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WU-P19. The 12 h fermented juice contained between 2.1 × 109 and 3.7 × 10 [...] Read more.
Nutritionally enhanced probioticated whole pineapple juice (WPJ, comprising juice of pineapple pulp and peel) beverages were produced by fermentation of WPJ with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WU-P19. The 12 h fermented juice contained between 2.1 × 109 and 3.7 × 109 live cells of the probiotic per milliliter, depending on the beverage formulation. The beverage had a pH of around 4.1 and a lactic acid content of ~12.8 g L−1. It had a total sugar (glucose, sucrose, fructose, maltose) content of ~100.2 g L−1. During fermentation, some of the initial glucose and fructose were consumed by the probiotic, but sucrose and maltose were not consumed. The original WPJ was free of vitamin B12, but fermentation enhanced vitamin B12 content (~19.5 mg L−1). In addition, fermentation enhanced the concentrations of vitamins B2, B3, and B6, but the bacterium consumed some of the vitamin B1 originally present. From a nutritional perspective, the final probioticated beverage was a good source of vitamin B12, vitamin C and vitamin B6. In addition, it contained nutritionally useful levels of vitamins B1, B2, and B3. The calorific value of the final beverage was 56.94 kcal per 100 mL. The product was stable during 21-day refrigerated (4 °C) storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentation for Better Nutrition, Health and Sustainability)
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