Special Issue "Antioxidants in Foods"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Isabel Seiquer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIC - Estación Experimental del Zaidín (EEZ), Granada, Spain
Interests: antioxidant food properties; edible oils; olive oil; food quality; dietary minerals; digestive process; bioavailability; cell cultures; antioxidant markers
Dr. José M. Palma
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Group of Antioxidants, Free Radicals and Nitric Oxide in Biotechnology, Food and Agriculture, Department of Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, CSIC, Apartado 419, 18080 Granada, Spain
Interests: fruit and vegetable antioxidants; reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; fruit ripening; transcriptomics; proteomics; metabolomics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interest in antioxidants in foods has highly increased over the last few decades, due to their beneficial effects in the prevention of degenerative diseases such as heart disease or cancer and in the processes associated with aging. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), where the main free radicals are framed, are highly reactive molecules constantly produced in biological reactions, whose excess is usually neutralized by a battery of defense mechanisms of the living organisms, including enzymes, vitamins. and a series of small antioxidant molecules. Depleted antioxidant defenses or overproduction of ROS can lead to oxidative stress, increasing the likelihood of damage to biological macromolecules, such as proteins, DNA and lipids. This damage is implicated in the severity of chronic diseases and, in that situation, dietary antioxidants gain special importance.

Fruits, vegetables, and virgin olive oil have been proposed as the main sources of antioxidants in the diet, as their intake could decrease the stress caused by ROS. Among food antioxidants, vitamins, pigments, and especially polyphenols have attracted great attention, not only due to their pharmacological and health potentialities, but also as targets to study their synthesis in crops in order to improve the product yield. In fact, the antioxidant activity of foods may be affected by many factors, such as the ripening state of fruits, the growing conditions of vegetables, or the thermal processing and preservation of foods.

Antioxidant compounds in foods may exert their action by several mechanisms and, in turn, there are different methods of measuring antioxidant properties, in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. Moreover, for an in vivo effect, antioxidant activity has to be maintained after the digestion process, i.e., antioxidant compounds, or their active metabolites, must be bioavailable.

Therefore, the scientific research on foods antioxidants is currently of great interest. In this Special Issue, original research papers or review articles focused on all the different aspects of antioxidants in foods are welcome.   

Dr. Isabel Seiquer
Dr. José M. Palma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food antioxidants
  • Oxidative stress
  • Antioxidant activity
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Lipid oxidation
  • Polyphenols
  • Health benefits
  • Antioxidant and functional food
  • Food as nutraceutics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Antioxidant Metabolism and Chlorophyll Fluorescence during the Acclimatisation to Ex Vitro Conditions of Micropropagated Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Plants
Antioxidants 2019, 8(12), 615; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8120615 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
In this study, the functioning of antioxidant metabolism and photosynthesis efficiency during the acclimatisation of Stevia rebaudiana plants to ex vitro conditions was determined. A high percentage of acclimatised plants (93.3%) was obtained after four weeks. According to the extent of lipid peroxidation, [...] Read more.
In this study, the functioning of antioxidant metabolism and photosynthesis efficiency during the acclimatisation of Stevia rebaudiana plants to ex vitro conditions was determined. A high percentage of acclimatised plants (93.3%) was obtained after four weeks. According to the extent of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress occurred during the first hours of acclimatisation. A lower activity of monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) than dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) was observed after 2 days of acclimatisation. However, after 7 days of acclimatisation, stevia plants activated the MDHAR route to recycle ascorbate, which is much more efficient energetically than the DHAR route. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities showed a peak of activity after 7 days of acclimatisation, suggesting a protection against reactive oxygen species. Peroxidase activity increased about 2-fold after 2 days of acclimatisation and remained high until day 14, probably linked to the cell wall stiffening and the lignification processes. In addition, a progressive increase in the photochemical quenching parameters and the electronic transport rate was observed, coupled with a decrease in the non-photochemical quenching parameters, which indicate a progressive photosynthetic efficiency during this process. Taken together, antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and chlorophyll fluorescence are proven as suitable tools for the physiological state evaluation of micropropagated plants during acclimatisation to ex vitro conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Foods)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Food Processing on In Vivo Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Properties of Green Tea Extracts
Antioxidants 2019, 8(12), 572; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8120572 - 21 Nov 2019
Abstract
Food processing can affect the nutrition and safety of foods. A previous study showed that tannase and ultrasound treatment could significantly increase the antioxidant activities of green tea extracts according to in vitro evaluation methods. Since the results from in vitro and in [...] Read more.
Food processing can affect the nutrition and safety of foods. A previous study showed that tannase and ultrasound treatment could significantly increase the antioxidant activities of green tea extracts according to in vitro evaluation methods. Since the results from in vitro and in vivo experiments may be inconsistent, the in vivo antioxidant activities of the extracts were studied using a mouse model of alcohol-induced acute liver injury in this study. Results showed that all the extracts decreased the levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine aminotransferase in serum, reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and triacylglycerol in the liver, and increased the levels of catalase and glutathione in the liver, which can alleviate hepatic oxidative injury. In addition, the differences between treated and original extracts were not significant in vivo. In some cases, the food processing can have a negative effect on in vivo antioxidant activities. That is, although tannase and ultrasound treatment can significantly increase the antioxidant activities of green tea extracts in vitro, it cannot improve the in vivo antioxidant activities, which indicates that some food processing might not always have positive effects on products for human benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Foods)
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