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Anthocyanins: From the Field to the Antioxidants in the Body

1
Institute of Horticulture, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, 54333 Babtai, Lithuania
2
Laboratory of Biochemistry, Neuroscience Institute, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania
3
Department of Pharmacognosy, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania
4
Department of Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(9), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090819
Received: 22 July 2020 / Revised: 21 August 2020 / Accepted: 29 August 2020 / Published: 2 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Foods)
Anthocyanins are biologically active water-soluble plant pigments that are responsible for blue, purple, and red colors in various plant parts—especially in fruits and blooms. Anthocyanins have attracted attention as natural food colorants to be used in yogurts, juices, marmalades, and bakery products. Numerous studies have also indicated the beneficial health effects of anthocyanins and their metabolites on human or animal organisms, including free-radical scavenging and antioxidant activity. Thus, our aim was to review the current knowledge about anthocyanin occurrence in plants, their stability during processing, and also the bioavailability and protective effects related to the antioxidant activity of anthocyanins in human and animal brains, hearts, livers, and kidneys. View Full-Text
Keywords: anthocyanin metabolites; antioxidants; cardioprotection; hepatoprotection; nephroprotection; neuroprotection anthocyanin metabolites; antioxidants; cardioprotection; hepatoprotection; nephroprotection; neuroprotection
MDPI and ACS Style

Bendokas, V.; Stanys, V.; Mažeikienė, I.; Trumbeckaite, S.; Baniene, R.; Liobikas, J. Anthocyanins: From the Field to the Antioxidants in the Body. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 819. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090819

AMA Style

Bendokas V, Stanys V, Mažeikienė I, Trumbeckaite S, Baniene R, Liobikas J. Anthocyanins: From the Field to the Antioxidants in the Body. Antioxidants. 2020; 9(9):819. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090819

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bendokas, Vidmantas; Stanys, Vidmantas; Mažeikienė, Ingrida; Trumbeckaite, Sonata; Baniene, Rasa; Liobikas, Julius. 2020. "Anthocyanins: From the Field to the Antioxidants in the Body" Antioxidants 9, no. 9: 819. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090819

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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