Special Issue "Further Metabolism in Plant System"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. José M. Palma
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Guest Editor
Group of Antioxidants, Free Radicals and Nitric Oxide in Biotechnology, Food and Agriculture, Department of Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, CSIC, Apartado 419, 18080 Granada, Spain
Interests: fruit and vegetable antioxidants; reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; fruit ripening; transcriptomics; proteomics; metabolomics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the initial stages of agriculture in the Neolithic, man has been always aware of crop benefits for health. Thus, the search for new and more nutritive agro-produce has been a target for human communities and, accordingly, breeding strategies have been developed in search of novel species and varieties destined for human consumption. From the early contributions in Old Persian, Egyptian and Greek cultures, up until the present, agricultural science has evolved enormously. From the simple description of natural compounds contained in our crops, research nowadays seeks thus far unreported functional molecules, which contribute to maintain and gain our health status; however, we also seek to understand how plants cope against unfavorable conditions, promoted by different agents, such as salinity, drought, flooding, cold, heavy metals, pathogens, and others.

The development of cutting edge throughput and fine technologies are greatly helping the objectives of current agricultural science. Approaches, such as genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, ionomics, and others initiatives that combine the accurate individualization of molecules (genes, proteins, metabolites) with their identification and quantification, are providing a bulk of data with agricultural, industrial, and commercial potential.

This Special Issue will be focused on further metabolism in plant systems, and it is expected to be an Agora where plant biologists, with expertise in the response of agricultural species to biotic and abiotic stresses, the new culture strategies to increase the nutritional value of plant products, the ripening and post-harvest of fruits, the antioxidative and functional compounds present in crops, and the new technologies applied to the improvement of agriculture, will bring their knowledge to be shared with the scientific community, farmers, and companies.

Prof. José M. Palma
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fruit metabolism
  • Plant Stress
  • Fruit genomics
  • Fruit proteomics
  • Fruit metabolomics
  • Crop culture

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
“Alperujo” Compost Improves the Ascorbate (Vitamin C) Content in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Fruits and Influences Their Oxidative Metabolism
Agronomy 2018, 8(6), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8060082 - 25 May 2018
Abstract
“Alperujo” compost was evaluated as an organic fertiliser for pepper growth under greenhouse conditions. Even though the total nitrogen applied was similar, plants only grown with composts experienced a development decline as compared to those grown with standard nutrient solution. This was perhaps [...] Read more.
“Alperujo” compost was evaluated as an organic fertiliser for pepper growth under greenhouse conditions. Even though the total nitrogen applied was similar, plants only grown with composts experienced a development decline as compared to those grown with standard nutrient solution. This was perhaps because nitrogen from the compost was essentially organic, and not easily available for roots. When, alternatively, the compost was supplemented with nitrate, a synergetic effect was observed, favouring plant development and fruit yield, simultaneously with the increase of compost rates. Compost affected the oxidative metabolism of pepper plants by increasing their antioxidative enzyme activities catalase and superoxide dismutases and the non-enzymatic antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione. Overall, when nitrogen limitation occurred and only compost was used as fertiliser, an oxidative stress took place, whereas in plants grown with nitrate-supplemented compost it did not. Furthermore, these pepper plants experienced a yield increase and, more importantly, an enhancement of the ascorbate content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Further Metabolism in Plant System)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Arsenic Accumulation in Rice and Probable Mitigation Approaches: A Review
Agronomy 2017, 7(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy7040067 - 12 Oct 2017
Cited by 13
Abstract
According to recent reports, millions of people across the globe are suffering from arsenic (As) toxicity. Arsenic is present in different oxidative states in the environment and enters in the food chain through soil and water. In the agricultural field, irrigation with arsenic [...] Read more.
According to recent reports, millions of people across the globe are suffering from arsenic (As) toxicity. Arsenic is present in different oxidative states in the environment and enters in the food chain through soil and water. In the agricultural field, irrigation with arsenic contaminated water, that is, having a higher level of arsenic contamination on the top soil, which may affects the quality of crop production. The major crop like rice (Oryza sativa L.) requires a considerable amount of water to complete its lifecycle. Rice plants potentially accumulate arsenic, particularly inorganic arsenic (iAs) from the field, in different body parts including grains. Different transporters have been reported in assisting the accumulation of arsenic in plant cells; for example, arsenate (AsV) is absorbed with the help of phosphate transporters, and arsenite (AsIII) through nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) by the silicon transport pathway and plasma membrane intrinsic protein aquaporins. Researchers and practitioners are trying their level best to mitigate the problem of As contamination in rice. However, the solution strategies vary considerably with various factors, such as cultural practices, soil, water, and environmental/economic conditions, etc. The contemporary work on rice to explain arsenic uptake, transport, and metabolism processes at rhizosphere, may help to formulate better plans. Common agronomical practices like rain water harvesting for crop irrigation, use of natural components that help in arsenic methylation, and biotechnological approaches may explore how to reduce arsenic uptake by food crops. This review will encompass the research advances and practical agronomic strategies on arsenic contamination in rice crop. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Further Metabolism in Plant System)
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Open AccessFeature PaperEditor’s ChoiceReview
Plant Responses to Salt Stress: Adaptive Mechanisms
Agronomy 2017, 7(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy7010018 - 23 Feb 2017
Cited by 146
Abstract
This review deals with the adaptive mechanisms that plants can implement to cope with the challenge of salt stress. Plants tolerant to NaCl implement a series of adaptations to acclimate to salinity, including morphological, physiological and biochemical changes. These changes include increases in [...] Read more.
This review deals with the adaptive mechanisms that plants can implement to cope with the challenge of salt stress. Plants tolerant to NaCl implement a series of adaptations to acclimate to salinity, including morphological, physiological and biochemical changes. These changes include increases in the root/canopy ratio and in the chlorophyll content in addition to changes in the leaf anatomy that ultimately lead to preventing leaf ion toxicity, thus maintaining the water status in order to limit water loss and protect the photosynthesis process. Furthermore, we deal with the effect of salt stress on photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence and some of the mechanisms thought to protect the photosynthetic machinery, including the xanthophyll cycle, photorespiration pathway, and water-water cycle. Finally, we also provide an updated discussion on salt-induced oxidative stress at the subcellular level and its effect on the antioxidant machinery in both salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive plants. The aim is to extend our understanding of how salinity may affect the physiological characteristics of plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Further Metabolism in Plant System)
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