Special Issue "Sustainable Agriculture and Water Footprint"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Gokhan Egilmez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Department of Entrepreneurship and Innovation; University of New Haven, West Haven, CT 06516, USA
Tel. 203-479-4196
Interests: input output extended life cycle assessment; sustainability assessment of agriculture and food production systems; carbon, water, energy, and land footprint analysis; industrial ecology; circular economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water footprint is one of the critical impact areas of agricultural and food production activities. Therefore, it is critical to present a Special Issue that invites papers on theoretical and practical contributions towards reducing the water footprint for the sustainable development of agricultural systems. The following areas could be of interest for this Special Issue: 1. Life cycle assessment applications in agriculture with a water footprint focus; 2. specific applications of sustainable farming practices (technology, equipment, land treatment, etc.); 3. agricultural value chain and water footprint; 4. innovative irrigation systems; 5. water re-use and recycling in agricultural operations; and 6. circular economy and agricultural and food production.

Dr. Gokhan Egilmez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water footprint
  • agriculture
  • food
  • production
  • value chain
  • circular economy
  • farming

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Water-Stressed Loquat Trees Need More Time and Heat to Ripen Their Fruits
Agronomy 2018, 8(6), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8060086 - 01 Jun 2018
Abstract
To determine if water-stressed trees need more time and heat to mature their fruits, we compared chronological and thermal time from bloom to harvest among control fully-irrigated ‘Algerie’ loquat trees and trees suffering prior-to-bloom deficit irrigation (DI). Heat requirement calculation was performed using [...] Read more.
To determine if water-stressed trees need more time and heat to mature their fruits, we compared chronological and thermal time from bloom to harvest among control fully-irrigated ‘Algerie’ loquat trees and trees suffering prior-to-bloom deficit irrigation (DI). Heat requirement calculation was performed using the double sine method with a lower threshold temperature of 3 °C. The results show that the greater the blooming advancement achieved by DI, the longer the period to mature the fruits. Such a pattern indicates that the longer duration for bloom-harvest period under DI is due to a displacement of the reproductive phenology to cooler dates. However, some effects of DI on heat requirements for ripening persist, indicating a slower fruit development in some, but not all, DI treatments. The differences in fruit development rate between fully-irrigated and water-stressed trees were established during the phase of rapid fruit growth. The comparison of water stress effects on sink (flower size and seed number) and source (leaf number and size, gas exchange and mineral and carbohydrate nutrition) of DI treatments seems to indicate that the amount of stored reserves in the leaves to sustain early fruit development is the most plausible reason behind the increase in thermal time between bloom and harvest in water-stressed loquats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture and Water Footprint)
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Open AccessArticle
Salt Stress Effects on Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) Plants with and without Seaweed Extract (Ascophyllum nodosum) Application
Agronomy 2018, 8(5), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8050064 - 04 May 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Salinity is one of the major factors limiting avocado yield, primarily due to the high concentration of ions in irrigation water. An experiment was conducted on 2 year old avocado plants (Persea americana Mill.) cv. Hass, grafted onto Duke 7 clonal rootstock [...] Read more.
Salinity is one of the major factors limiting avocado yield, primarily due to the high concentration of ions in irrigation water. An experiment was conducted on 2 year old avocado plants (Persea americana Mill.) cv. Hass, grafted onto Duke 7 clonal rootstock growing in pots, to determine the effect of salt stress on growth, as well as physiological and biochemical responses, and the effect of seaweed extract (Ascophyllum nodosum) on salinity stress. Treatments consisted of different types of irrigation water: distilled water, 9 mM NaCl water, distilled water + 2.25 mL of seaweed extract, 9 mM NaCl water + 2.25 mL of seaweed extract and, 9 mM NaCl water + 1.5 mL of seaweed extract. The irrigation treatment was applied every 15 days for 8 months. Treatments with salt reduced plant growth by approximately 50% of the fresh weight of all avocado plant tissues. Seaweed extract reduced the effects of abiotic stress only at an early stage, and increased potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) concentrations in leaves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture and Water Footprint)
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