Special Issue "Bioactive Natural and Synthetic Products in Human Health and Diseases: Basic, Preclinical and Clinical Studies"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2022 | Viewed by 3856

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Felicite Noubissi-Kamdem
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, College of Science Engineering and Technology Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217, USA
Interests: molecular mechanisms of cancer development and metastasis; role of IGF2BP1 in the pathology of colorectal cancer and basal cell carcinoma; cancer cell fusion and breast tumor heterogeneity and metastasis; mRNA turnover and cancer development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Anthony L. Walker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Clinical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana Monroe, 1800 Bienville Drive, Monroe, LA 71201, USA
Interests: pharmacy practice; laboratory pedagogy and teaching styles; pharmaceutical compounding; natural products and formulation; compounding novel dosage forms for drug delivery; pharmacy practice clinical; educational and natural product research; health screening in under-privileged communities
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jean Christopher Chamcheu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Basic Pharmaceutical and Toxicological Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, 1800 Bienville Drive, Monroe, LA 71201, USA
Interests: skin health and diseases; carcinogenesis; inflammation; dermatology; psoriasis; atopic dermatitis; bioactive natural products; antioxidants; polyphenols; flavonoids; tissue engineering; signaling pathways; pharmacology; tissue engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The homeostasis of the human body is guaranteed throughout life, and across all ages, by the use of nature’s blessed natural dietary products or in their modified format as synthetic scaffold products that help to boost immunity, maintain health, treat ailments or prevent disease occurrence or recurrence, and thus ensure normal wellbeing. Biologically active natural and plant-derived (e.g., fruits and vegetables) product preparations and synthetic scaffold products are garnering interest as valid human-health promotion, disease prevention, and management  entities, both in modern and alternative medicine. Several of these bio-actives are antioxidants, polyphenols, and other major medicinal entities that regulate vital physiological processes including gene expression, protein synthesis, metabolism, differentiation, and growth by mechanisms that are not well understood. Through epidemiological and intervention studies, several of these bioactives have been claimed and/or proven to offer protection against aging and health, environmental hazards, oxidative stress, infection and several chronic inflammatory diseases like acne, atopic dermatitis, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, psoriasis, diabetes, diabetic ulcers, chronic wounds, various cancers, obesity, and several associated risk factors. Moreover, cutting-edge research utilizing physiologically attainable doses in appropriate in vitro and preclinical model systems have provided some mechanistic insights into their benefits. Additionally, validating the health-beneficial effects of nutraceuticals or pharmaceuticals and the detailed understanding of their intake, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, dose–response relationship, and efficacy are thought-provoking of complex relations, and such studies are warranted.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to update knowledge vis-à-vis the role of bioactive natural products from plants and dietary sources and synthetic scaffold compounds in human health and diseases such as those affecting the skin, other epithelial tissues like the breast, and other organ systems to shed light on the global relevance of scientific research findings on their usages. This may range from human health promotion, to disease prevention and treatment, to the reduction of adverse side effects, misuse, and purposeless spending.

To help bridge the current knowledge gap, this Special Issue of Nutrients invites the submission of manuscripts describing original research, communications, legislative documentations, or quality reviews of the scientific literature in health promotion and disease prevention and treatment in skin and other organs. These conditions may include but are not limited to infection; environmental and oxidative stress; chronic inflammatory diseases including skin conditions like acne, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and diabetic wounds; and various kinds of cancer. Submissions addressing a broad range of topics, including studies covering bioavailability, understanding physiological functional processes, molecular targets, pathways, and mechanisms of action are welcome. These may be in vitro studies, preclinical animal models, human population studies, and dietary intervention studies evaluating impacts on human health, disease prevention and management, and advice on intake and usage.

We look forward to your exciting submissions.

Dr. Felicite Noubissi-Kamdem
Dr. Anthony L. Walker
Dr. Jean Christopher Chamcheu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis
  • antioxidants and phenolic compounds
  • breast cancer
  • chronic human diseases
  • bioavailability and bioactivity
  • environmental factors and skin health
  • skin beauty, ageing, and disease
  • infection, immunity, and inflammation
  • cancer
  • natural dietary bioactives and food supplements
  • nutraceuticals and synthetic bioactive products
  • natural dietary products as alternative medicine
  • natural/synthetic bioactive agents for chemoprevention
  • nanoformulations and nanomedicine
  • human intervention trials
  • natural products, preclinical and clinical trials
  • natural and synthetic antimicrobials and immune-modulatory agents
  • phytonutrients for human health and disease

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Thymoquinone Alterations of the Apoptotic Gene Expressions and Cell Cycle Arrest in Genetically Distinct Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells
Nutrients 2022, 14(10), 2120; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14102120 - 19 May 2022
Viewed by 324
Abstract
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women worldwide, and it is one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. triple-negative breast Cancer (TNBC), a subtype of BC, is typically associated with the highest pathogenic grade and incidence in [...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women worldwide, and it is one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. triple-negative breast Cancer (TNBC), a subtype of BC, is typically associated with the highest pathogenic grade and incidence in premenopausal and young African American (AA) women. Chemotherapy, the most common treatment for TNBC today, can lead to acquired resistance and ineffective treatment. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are needed to combat medication resistance and ineffectiveness in TNBC patients. Thymoquinone (TQ) is shown to have a cytotoxic effect on human cancer cells in vitro. However, TQ’s mode of action and precise mechanism in TNBC disease in vitro have not been adequately investigated. Therefore, TQ’s effects on the genetically different MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines were assessed. The data obtained show that TQ displayed cytotoxic effects on MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner after 24 h, with IC50 values of 25.37 µM and 27.39 µM, respectively. Moreover, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells in a scratched wound-healing assay displayed poor wound closure, inhibiting invasion and migration via cell cycle blocking after 24 h. TQ arrested the cell cycle phase in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. The three cell cycle stages in MDA-MB-468 cells were significantly affected at 15 and 20 µM for G0/G1 and S phases, as well as all TQ concentrations for G2/M phases. In MDA-MB-468 cells, there was a significant decrease in G0/G1 phases with a substantial increase in the S phase and G2/M phases. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 showed a significant effect only during the two cell cycle stages (S and G2/M), at concentrations of 15 and 20 µM for S phases and all TQ values for G2/M phases. The TQ effect on the apoptotic gene profiles indicated that TQ upregulated 15 apoptotic genes in MDA-MB-231 TNBC cells, including caspases, GADD45A, TP53, DFFA, DIABLO, BNIP3, TRAF2/3, and TNFRSF10A. In MDA-MB-468 cells, 16 apoptotic genes were upregulated, including TNFRSF10A, TNF, TNFRSF11B, FADD TNFRSF10B, CASP2, and TRAF2, all of which are important for the apoptotic pathway andsuppress the expression of one anti-apoptotic gene, BIRC5, in MDA-MB-231 cells. Compared to MDA-MB-231 cells, elevated levels of TNF and their receptor proteins may contribute to their increased sensitivity to TQ-induced apoptosis. It was concluded from this study that TQ targets the MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells differently. Additionally, due to the aggressive nature of TNBC and the lack of specific therapies in chemoresistant TNBC, our findings related to the identified apoptotic gene profile may point to TQ as a potential agent for TNBC therapy. Full article
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Article
Perilla Fruit Oil-Fortified Soybean Milk Intake Alters Levels of Serum Triglycerides and Antioxidant Status, and Influences Phagocytotic Activity among Healthy Subjects: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091721 - 21 Apr 2022
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Abstract
This study aimed to develop perilla fruit oil (PFO)-fortified soybean milk (PFO-SM), identify its sensory acceptability, and evaluate its health outcomes. Our PFO-SM product was pasteurized, analyzed for its nutritional value, and had its acceptability assessed by an experienced and trained descriptive panel [...] Read more.
This study aimed to develop perilla fruit oil (PFO)-fortified soybean milk (PFO-SM), identify its sensory acceptability, and evaluate its health outcomes. Our PFO-SM product was pasteurized, analyzed for its nutritional value, and had its acceptability assessed by an experienced and trained descriptive panel (n = 100) based on a relevant set of sensory attributes. A randomized clinical trial was conducted involving healthy subjects who were assigned to consume deionized water (DI), SM, PFO-SM, or black sesame-soybean milk (BS-SM) (n = 48 each, 180 mL/serving) daily for 30 d. Accordingly, health indices and analyzed blood biomarkers were recorded. Consequently, 1% PFO-SM (1.26 mg ALA rich) was generally associated with very high scores for overall acceptance, color, flavor, odor, taste, texture, and sweetness. We observed that PFO-SM lowered levels of serum triglycerides and erythrocyte reactive oxygen species, but increased phagocytosis and serum antioxidant activity (p < 0.05) when compared to SM and BS-SM. These findings indicate that PFO supplementation in soybean milk could enhance radical-scavenging and phagocytotic abilities in the blood of healthy persons. In this regard, it was determined to be more efficient than black sesame supplementation. We are now better positioned to recommend the consumption of PFO-SM drink for the reduction of many chronic diseases. Randomized clinical trial registration (Reference number 41389) by IRSCTN Registry. Full article
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Article
Geraniol Ameliorates Doxorubicin-Mediated Kidney Injury through Alteration of Antioxidant Status, Inflammation, and Apoptosis: Potential Roles of NF-κB and Nrf2/Ho-1
Nutrients 2022, 14(8), 1620; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14081620 - 13 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Doxorubicin-mediated kidney impairment is a serious problem in cancer treatment. Accordingly, this work investigated the ability of geraniol to modulate doxorubicin-induced kidney damage using a rat model. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control, doxorubicin (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.), doxorubicin plus 100 [...] Read more.
Doxorubicin-mediated kidney impairment is a serious problem in cancer treatment. Accordingly, this work investigated the ability of geraniol to modulate doxorubicin-induced kidney damage using a rat model. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control, doxorubicin (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.), doxorubicin plus 100 mg/kg of geraniol, and doxorubicin plus 200 mg/kg of geraniol. A single doxorubicin injection triggered kidney impairment, as evidenced by the altered serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and albumin values; it also caused histological changes in the kidney architecture. Additionally, doxorubicin enhanced lipid peroxidation while lowering reduced glutathione, catalase activity, and the expression of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Interestingly, pre-treatment with geraniol rescued doxorubicin-induced alterations in kidney antioxidant parameters, enzymatic activity, and the expression of inflammatory and apoptosis-mediating gene and proteins. Moreover, prophylactic treatment with geraniol preserved most kidney histological characteristics in a dose-dependent manner. These findings support that geraniol could protect against doxorubicin-mediated kidney dysfunction. However, further research is needed to clarify the mechanisms of geraniol’s protective effects against doxorubicin-mediated kidney dysfunction. Full article
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Article
Korean Red Ginseng Extract Inhibits IL-8 Expression via Nrf2 Activation in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial Cells
Nutrients 2022, 14(5), 1044; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14051044 - 28 Feb 2022
Viewed by 810
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) causes gastric diseases by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and interleukin (IL)-8 expression in gastric epithelial cells. ROS and inflammatory responses are regulated by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the expression of [...] Read more.
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) causes gastric diseases by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and interleukin (IL)-8 expression in gastric epithelial cells. ROS and inflammatory responses are regulated by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the expression of Nrf2 target genes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We previously demonstrated that Korean red ginseng extract (RGE) decreases H. pylori-induced increases in ROS and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in gastric epithelial cells. We determined whether RGE suppresses the expression of IL-8 via Nrf2 activation and the expression of SOD and HO-1 in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial AGS cells. H. pylori-infected cells were treated with RGE with or without ML385, an Nrf2 inhibitor, or zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor. Levels of ROS and IL-8 expression; abundance of Keap1, HO-1, and SOD; levels of total, nuclear, and phosphorylated Nrf2; indices of mitochondrial dysfunction (reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP level); and SOD activity were determined. As a result, RGE disturbed Nrf2–Keap1 interactions and increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in uninfected cells. H. pylori infection decreased the protein levels of SOD-1 and HO-1, as well as SOD activity, which was reversed by RGE treatment. RGE reduced H. pylori-induced increases in ROS and IL-8 levels as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. ML385 or ZnPP reversed the inhibitory effect of RGE on the alterations caused by H. pylori. In conclusion, RGE suppressed IL-8 expression and mitochondrial dysfunction via Nrf2 activation, induction of SOD-1 and HO-1, and reduction of ROS in H. pylori-infected cells. Full article
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Article
Synergistic Effects of Korean Red Ginseng Extract and the Conventional Systemic Therapeutics of Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model
Nutrients 2022, 14(1), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010133 - 28 Dec 2021
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Abstract
The synergistic effects of Korean Red ginseng (KRG, Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.) on conventional systemic therapeutics of atopic dermatitis (AD) have not been studied yet. To analyze the synergistic effects of KRG extract and the conventional systemic therapeutics of AD in TNCB-induced AD [...] Read more.
The synergistic effects of Korean Red ginseng (KRG, Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.) on conventional systemic therapeutics of atopic dermatitis (AD) have not been studied yet. To analyze the synergistic effects of KRG extract and the conventional systemic therapeutics of AD in TNCB-induced AD mouse model, we determined the change in modified scoring of index, the transepidermal water loss, the skin pathology, serum IgE, and the expression of various cytokines after combination treatment to the five-week-old NC/Nga female mice. The severity of AD was significantly decreased in the KRG + hydroxyzine (AH) group than AH group, and in the KRG + evening primrose oil (EPO) group than EPO group. A significant decrease in dermal inflammation was observed in the KRG + AH group than that in the AH group, and in the KRG + EPO group than that in the EPO group (p = 0.008), respectively. A decrease in CD1a expression was observed in the KRG + AH group when compared to the AH group (p = 0.008), and KRG + EPO group when compared to the EPO group. Compared to the CS group, the KRG + CS group showed a significant decrease in IL-17 expression. A combination of KRG and conventional systemic therapeutics can safely and effectively manage the AD. Full article
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Review

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Review
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) and Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors and Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Clinical Studies
Nutrients 2022, 14(8), 1665; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14081665 - 16 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1053
Abstract
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) can be considered a multipurpose medicinal and dietary plant due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. Pomegranate can be used to prevent or treat metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors. Although previously published reviews addressed the effects of pomegranate [...] Read more.
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) can be considered a multipurpose medicinal and dietary plant due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. Pomegranate can be used to prevent or treat metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors. Although previously published reviews addressed the effects of pomegranate on different diseases, there is no systematic review that exclusively focuses on clinical trials related to all MetS-related risk factors. In view of this limitation, the objective of this up-to-date, comprehensive, and systematic review is to critically evaluate the potential of pomegranate (P. granatum) on various MetS risk factors on the basis of clinical studies. PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, COCHRANE, and Clinical Trials.gov databases were searched on 15 October 2021. The Preferred Reporting Items for a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis guidelines were followed, and the bias risk evaluation was performed according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We identified 5683 studies in the databases. After removing the duplicates, 3418 studies remained. Of these, 147 studies met the eligibility criteria, and finally, only 20 were included in the qualitative analysis. The included studies suggest that pomegranate can be beneficial to reduce body weight, blood pressure, glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Moreover, it can augment high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and improve insulin resistance. Although relevant effects were observed, additional well-designed clinical trials are needed to determine the correct formulations and doses to be used to prevent or treat MetS components. Full article
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