Special Issue "Nutraceuticals and the Skin: Roles in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Assist. Prof. Dr. Jean Christopher Chamcheu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Basic Pharmaceutical and Toxicological Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, 1800 Bienville Drive, Monroe, Louisiana 71201, USA
Interests: skin health and diseases; carcinogenesis; inflammation; dermatology; psoriasis; atopic dermatitis; bioactive natural products; antioxidants; polyphenols; flavonoids; tissue engineering; signaling pathways; pharmacology; tissue engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Deeba Nadeem Syed
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 4385, Medical Sciences Building, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Tel. +608-334-9900; Fax: +608-263-5223
Interests: UV radiation-skin; melanoma-BRAF-inhibitor resistance mechanisms; natural compounds-cancer
Dr. G. Kerr Whitfield
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Arizona College of Medicine—Phoenix, Rm 426, ABC1 Building, 425 N Fifth St, Phoenix, AZ 85004-2157, USA
Tel. +602-827-2142; Fax: +602-827 2127
Interests: Vitamin D receptor; Vitamin D receptor ligands; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; delphinidin; cyanidin; lithocholic acid; docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); curcumin

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The skin is the largest organ of the body and serves as a barrier between the inner and external environments. As such, any problems in the skin can have serious effects on systemic health and well-being. Several studies have established that both nutritional and dietary factors play an important role in the maintenance of the normal skin integrity, where they can execute a causative, preventative and/or treatment role in a number of skin related conditions. Nutritional factors have been studied for their involvement in skin ageing, acne, inflammation and several chronic immune-mediated disorders such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, diabetes, obesity, wounds and various types of skin cancer. The skin condition, in turn, can affect nutritional choices and subsequent nutritional and health status.

There are a multitude of mechanisms by which nutraceuticals can counteract adverse skin conditions. Consumption of a diet rich in nutrients and vitamins (nutraceuticals and antioxidants), particularly those derived from fruits and vegetables, not only supports health in general, but also skin maintenance and repair in particular. Epidemiological evidence links consumption of these diets with prevention and mitigation of disease progression. For example, nutraceuticals with anti-oxidative or metal chelating properties are being actively evaluated as natural tools to modulate, prevent or inhibit oxidative processes or modulate advanced glycation end products (AGEs), but many other properties of dietary compounds with relevance to skin remain to be characterized.

For this Special Issue of Nutrients, we invite the submission of manuscripts either describing original research, or reviewing scientific literature examining the role of diets and/or specific nutraceuticals in the prevention and treatment of skin disorders. We welcome submissions that discuss how nutraceuticals act via antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and other cellular actions to prevent or ameliorate disease processes. In particular, we encourage submission of studies that contain a detailed assessment of the molecular mechanisms of action of dietary compounds in the treatment of skin ageing, acne, inflammation, and chronic diseases like atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, diabetes, wounds and various types of skin cancer.

We look forward to your submissions.

Dr. Jean Christopher Chamcheu
Dr. Deeba Nadeem Syed
Dr. G Kerr Whitfield
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • AGEs

  • acne

  • ageing

  • antioxidants

  • chronic skin diseases

  • dietary supplementation

  • inflammation

  • nutraceuticals

  • nutraceuticals and skin disease

  • nutrients

  • nutrition and human health

  • nutrition and skin disease

  • prevention

  • psoriasis

  • skin cancers

  • skin care

  • wounds

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Bioactive Dietary VDR Ligands Regulate Genes Encoding Biomarkers of Skin Repair That Are Associated with Risk for Psoriasis
Nutrients 2018, 10(2), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10020174 - 04 Feb 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) improves psoriasis symptoms, possibly by inducing the expression of late cornified envelope (LCE)3 genes involved in skin repair. In psoriasis patients, the majority of whom harbor genomic deletion of LCE3B and LCE3C (LCE3C_LCE3B-del), [...] Read more.
Treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) improves psoriasis symptoms, possibly by inducing the expression of late cornified envelope (LCE)3 genes involved in skin repair. In psoriasis patients, the majority of whom harbor genomic deletion of LCE3B and LCE3C (LCE3C_LCE3B-del), we propose that certain dietary analogues of 1,25D activate the expression of residual LCE3A/LCE3D/LCE3E genes to compensate for the loss of LCE3B/LCE3C in the deletant genotype. Herein, human keratinocytes (HEKn) homozygous for LCE3C_LCE3B-del were treated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and curcumin, two low-affinity, nutrient ligands for the vitamin D receptor (VDR). DHA and curcumin induce the expression of LCE3A/LCE3D/LCE3E mRNAs at concentrations corresponding to their affinity for VDR. Moreover, immunohistochemical quantitation revealed that the treatment of keratinocytes with DHA or curcumin stimulates LCE3 protein expression, while simultaneously opposing the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)-signaled phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases, p38 and Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), thereby overcoming inflammation biomarkers elicited by TNFα challenge. Finally, DHA and curcumin modulate two transcription factors relevant to psoriatic inflammation, the activator protein-1 factor Jun B and the nuclear receptor NR4A2/NURR1, that is implicated as a mediator of VDR ligand-triggered gene control. These findings provide insights into the mechanism(s) whereby dietary VDR ligands alter inflammatory and barrier functions relevant to skin repair, and may provide a molecular basis for improved treatments for mild/moderate psoriasis. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Possible Mechanisms of the Prevention of Doxorubicin Toxicity by Cichoric Acid—Antioxidant Nutrient
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010044 - 05 Jan 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Skin is the largest organ in the human body, and which protects organism against unfavorable external factors e.g., chemicals, environment pollutants, allergens, microorganisms, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining general homeostasis. It is also an important target of oxidative stress due [...] Read more.
Skin is the largest organ in the human body, and which protects organism against unfavorable external factors e.g., chemicals, environment pollutants, allergens, microorganisms, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining general homeostasis. It is also an important target of oxidative stress due to the activity of oxygen reactive species (ROS), which are constantly generated in the fibroblasts in response to exogenous or endogenous prooxidant agents. An example of such compound with proved prooxidant activity is Doxorubicin (DOX), which is an effective anticancer agent belongs in anthracycline antibiotic group. Increasingly frequent implementation of various strategies to reduce undesirable DOX side effects was observed. Very promising results come from the combination of DOX with dietary antioxidants from the polyphenol group of compounds, such as cichoric acid (CA) in order to lower oxidative stress level. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of CA combined with DOX on the oxidative stress parameters in fibroblasts, which constitute the main cells in human skin. We also wanted to examine anti-apoptotic activity of CA in fibroblasts treated with selected concentrations of DOX. Results obtained from the combination of DOX with CA revealed that CA exhibits cytoprotective activity against DOX-induced damage by lowering oxidative stress level and by inhibiting apoptosis. The present finding may indicate that CA may serve as antioxidative and anti-apoptotic agent, active against DOX-induced damage. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Is Skin Coloration Measured by Reflectance Spectroscopy Related to Intake of Nutrient-Dense Foods? A Cross-Sectional Evaluation in Australian Young Adults
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010011 - 23 Dec 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
The current study examines associations between the dietary intakes of nutrient-dense foods, measured using brief indices and skin coloration, measured using reflectance spectroscopy in young adults. This is a cross-sectional analysis of 148 young Australian males and females (55% female) aged 18 to [...] Read more.
The current study examines associations between the dietary intakes of nutrient-dense foods, measured using brief indices and skin coloration, measured using reflectance spectroscopy in young adults. This is a cross-sectional analysis of 148 young Australian males and females (55% female) aged 18 to 25 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, with responses used to calculate two dietary indices: (i) the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS); and (ii) the Fruit And Vegetable VAriety Score (FAVVA). Skin yellowness was measured at three body locations using reflectance spectroscopy. Associations were assessed using Spearman’s correlation coefficients, regression analysis, and agreement using weighted kappa (Kw). Significant, moderate correlations were found between skin yellowness and diet index scores for the ARFS (ρ = 0.30, p < 0.001) and FAVVA score (ρ = 0.39, p < 0.001). These remained significant after adjustment for confounders (total fat intake, sex, skin lightness) and for agreement based on categorical rankings. Results suggest that measurement of skin coloration by reflectance spectroscopy can be used as an indicator of overall dietary quality and variety in young adults. Further exploration in diverse populations is required. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Claimed Effects, Outcome Variables and Methods of Measurement for Health Claims Proposed Under European Community Regulation 1924/2006 in the Framework of Maintenance of Skin Function
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010007 - 22 Dec 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
Evidence suggests a protective role for several nutrients and foods in the maintenance of skin function. Nevertheless, all the requests for authorization to use health claims under Article 13(5) in the framework of maintenance of skin function presented to the European Food Safety [...] Read more.
Evidence suggests a protective role for several nutrients and foods in the maintenance of skin function. Nevertheless, all the requests for authorization to use health claims under Article 13(5) in the framework of maintenance of skin function presented to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) have received a negative opinion. Reasons for such failures are mainly due to an insufficient substantiation of the claimed effects, including the choice of inappropriate outcome variables (OVs) and methods of measurement (MMs). The present paper reports the results of an investigation aimed at collecting, collating and critically analyzing the information with relation to claimed effects (CEs), OVs and MMs related to skin health compliance with Regulation 1924/2006. CEs, OVs and MMs were collected from both the EFSA Guidance document and from the authorization requests of health claims under Article 13(5). The critical analysis of OVs and MMs was based on a literature review, and was aimed at defining their appropriateness (alone or in combination with others) in the context of a specific CE. The results highlight the importance of an adequate choice of OVs and MMs for an effective substantiation of the claims. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Dioscorea quinqueloba Ameliorates Oxazolone- and 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-induced Atopic Dermatitis Symptoms in Murine Models
Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1324; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121324 - 05 Dec 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Dioscorea quinqueloba has been used for food substances, as well as in herbal medicines for allergic diseases such as asthma. This study aimed to investigate the anti-atopic dermatitis (AD) effects of the total extract of D. quinqueloba rhizomes and active fractionson murine oxazolone- [...] Read more.
Dioscorea quinqueloba has been used for food substances, as well as in herbal medicines for allergic diseases such as asthma. This study aimed to investigate the anti-atopic dermatitis (AD) effects of the total extract of D. quinqueloba rhizomes and active fractionson murine oxazolone- and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced models of AD. Specific AD symptoms, such as erythema, ear swelling, and epidermis thickening, were significantly reduced in the oxazolone-mediated AD BALB/c mice upon topical application of D. quinqueloba rhizomes 95% EtOH extract (DQ). DQEA (D. quinqueloba rhizomes EtOAc fraction) was beneficial for protecting the skin barrier against AD in DNCB-sensitized SKH-1 hairless mice. Decreased total serum IgE and IL-4 levels could be observed in atopic dorsal skin samples of the DQEA-treated group. On the basis of the phytochemical analysis, DQEA was found to contain dioscin and gracillin as its main compounds. Therapeutic applications with D. quinqueloba might be useful in the treatment of AD and related inflammatory skin diseases. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Elucidating the Skin Delivery of Aglycone and Glycoside Flavonoids: How the Structures Affect Cutaneous Absorption
Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1304; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121304 - 30 Nov 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
Flavonoids are bioactive phytochemicals that exhibit protective potential against cutaneous inflammation and photoaging. We selected eight flavonoid aglycones or glycosides to elucidate the chemistry behind their skin absorption capability through experimental and computational approaches. The skin delivery was conducted using nude mouse and [...] Read more.
Flavonoids are bioactive phytochemicals that exhibit protective potential against cutaneous inflammation and photoaging. We selected eight flavonoid aglycones or glycosides to elucidate the chemistry behind their skin absorption capability through experimental and computational approaches. The skin delivery was conducted using nude mouse and pig skins mounted on an in vitro Franz cell assembly. The anti-inflammatory activity was examined using the O2 Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Orally Administered Collagen Peptides from Bovine Bone on Skin Aging in Chronologically Aged Mice
Nutrients 2017, 9(11), 1209; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111209 - 03 Nov 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
Collagen peptides (CPs) have demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on skin photoaging. However, little has been done to evaluate their effects on chronologically aged skin. Here, the effects of CPs from bovine bone on skin aging were investigated in chronologically aged mice. 13-month-old [...] Read more.
Collagen peptides (CPs) have demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on skin photoaging. However, little has been done to evaluate their effects on chronologically aged skin. Here, the effects of CPs from bovine bone on skin aging were investigated in chronologically aged mice. 13-month-old female Kunming mice were administered with CPs from bovine bone (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight/day) or proline (400 mg/kg body weight/day) for 8 weeks. Mice body weight, spleen index (SI) and thymus index (TI), degree of skin laxity (DSL), skin components, skin histology and antioxidant indicators were analyzed. Ingestion of CPs or proline had no effect on mice skin moisture and hyaluronic acid content, but it significantly improved the skin laxity, repaired collagen fibers, increased collagen content and normalized the ratio of type I to type III collagen in chronologically aged skin. CPs prepared by Alcalase performed better than CPs prepared by collagenase. Furthermore, CPs intake also significantly improved the antioxidative enzyme activities in skin. These results indicate that oral administration of CPs from bovine bone or proline can improve the laxity of chronologically aged skin by changing skin collagen quantitatively and qualitatively, and highlight their potential application as functional foods to combat skin aging in chronologically aged process. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Recovery Effects of Oral Administration of Glucosylceramide and Beet Extract on Skin Barrier Destruction by UVB in Hairless Mice
Nutrients 2017, 9(11), 1178; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111178 - 27 Oct 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Purified glucosylceramide from beet extract (beet GlcCer) and beet extract containing an equal amount of GlcCer were administered orally to ultra violet B (UVB)-irradiated mice, and differences in the protective effects against skin barrier dysfunction caused by UVB irradiation were compared. In the [...] Read more.
Purified glucosylceramide from beet extract (beet GlcCer) and beet extract containing an equal amount of GlcCer were administered orally to ultra violet B (UVB)-irradiated mice, and differences in the protective effects against skin barrier dysfunction caused by UVB irradiation were compared. In the beet GlcCer group, epidermal thickening and the decrease in stratum corneum (SC) ceramide content caused by UVB irradiation were reduced. In the group that was orally administered beet extract containing glucosylceramide, effects similar to those in the beet GlcCer group were observed. Oral administration of beet GlcCer had no obvious effects against an increase in TEWL or decrease in SC water content after UVB irradiation, but there was improvement in the beet extract group. Oral administration of beet GlcCer is effective in improving skin barrier function in UVB-irradiated mice. Beet extract contains constituents other than GlcCer that are also effective in improving skin barrier function. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Influences of Orally Taken Carotenoid-Rich Curly Kale Extract on Collagen I/Elastin Index of the Skin
Nutrients 2017, 9(7), 775; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9070775 - 19 Jul 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Two differently designed, spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy-based scanners and two-photon tomography were used for noninvasive in vivo determination of cutaneous carotenoids, and collagen I/elastin aging index of dermis, respectively, in the skin of 29 healthy female volunteers between 40 and 56 years of [...] Read more.
Two differently designed, spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy-based scanners and two-photon tomography were used for noninvasive in vivo determination of cutaneous carotenoids, and collagen I/elastin aging index of dermis, respectively, in the skin of 29 healthy female volunteers between 40 and 56 years of age. The volunteers received a supplement in the form of a carotenoid-rich natural curly kale extract containing 1650 µg of carotenoids in total (three capsules of 550 µg), once a day. Measurements were taken before, after 5 months and after 10 months of daily supplementation. The results showed significantly increased values for the cutaneous carotenoids and the collagen I/elastin aging index of dermis 5 and 10 months after the beginning of the study. The obtained results show that a natural carotenoid-rich extract could prevent the aging-related collagen I degradation in the dermis and improve the extracellular matrix. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nutraceuticals for Skin Care: A Comprehensive Review of Human Clinical Studies
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040403 - 24 Mar 2018
Cited by 14
Abstract
The skin is the body’s largest organ, it participates in sensitivity and offers protection against microorganisms, chemicals and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Consequently, the skin may suffer alterations such as photo-ageing, immune dysfunction and inflammation which may significantly affect human health. Nutraceuticals represent a [...] Read more.
The skin is the body’s largest organ, it participates in sensitivity and offers protection against microorganisms, chemicals and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Consequently, the skin may suffer alterations such as photo-ageing, immune dysfunction and inflammation which may significantly affect human health. Nutraceuticals represent a promising strategy for preventing, delaying, or minimising premature ageing of the skin and also to alleviate certain skin disorders. Among them, bioactive peptides and oligosaccharides, plant polyphenols, carotenoids, vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids are the most widely used ingredients. Supplementation with these products has shown evidence of having an effect on the signs of ageing and protection against UV radiation ageing in several human trials. In this review, the most relevant human studies on skin nutraceuticals are evaluated and the statistical resolution, biological relevance of their results, and, the trial protocols are discussed. In conclusion, quality and rigorousness of the trials must be improved to build credible scientific evidence for skin nutraceuticals and to establish a cause-effect relationship between the ingredients the beneficial effects for the skin. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Targeting NRF2 for Improved Skin Barrier Function and Photoprotection: Focus on the Achiote-Derived Apocarotenoid Bixin
Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1371; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121371 - 18 Dec 2017
Cited by 14
Abstract
The transcription factor NRF2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2) orchestrates major cellular defense mechanisms including phase-II detoxification, inflammatory signaling, DNA repair, and antioxidant response. Recent studies strongly suggest a protective role of NRF2-mediated gene expression in the suppression of cutaneous photodamage induced by solar [...] Read more.
The transcription factor NRF2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2) orchestrates major cellular defense mechanisms including phase-II detoxification, inflammatory signaling, DNA repair, and antioxidant response. Recent studies strongly suggest a protective role of NRF2-mediated gene expression in the suppression of cutaneous photodamage induced by solar UV (ultraviolet) radiation. The apocarotenoid bixin, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved natural food colorant (referred to as ‘annatto’) originates from the seeds of the achiote tree native to tropical America, consumed by humans since ancient times. Use of achiote preparations for skin protection against environmental insult and for enhanced wound healing has long been documented. We have recently reported that (i) bixin is a potent canonical activator of the NRF2-dependent cytoprotective response in human skin keratinocytes; that (ii) systemic administration of bixin activates NRF2 with protective effects against solar UV-induced skin damage; and that (iii) bixin-induced suppression of photodamage is observable in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− SKH-1 mice confirming the NRF2-dependence of bixin-induced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, bixin displays molecular activities as sacrificial antioxidant, excited state quencher, PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) α/γ agonist, and TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4/NFκB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) antagonist, all of which might be relevant to the enhancement of skin barrier function and environmental stress protection. Potential skin photoprotection and photochemoprevention benefits provided by topical application or dietary consumption of this ethno-pharmacologically validated phytochemical originating from the Americas deserves further preclinical and clinical examination. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Capsaicin: Friend or Foe in Skin Cancer and Other Related Malignancies?
Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1365; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121365 - 16 Dec 2017
Cited by 13
Abstract
Capsaicin is the main pungent in chili peppers, one of the most commonly used spices in the world; its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties have been proven in various cultures for centuries. It is a lipophilic substance belonging to the class of vanilloids and [...] Read more.
Capsaicin is the main pungent in chili peppers, one of the most commonly used spices in the world; its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties have been proven in various cultures for centuries. It is a lipophilic substance belonging to the class of vanilloids and an agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor. Taking into consideration the complex neuro-immune impact of capsaicin and the potential link between inflammation and carcinogenesis, the effect of capsaicin on muco-cutaneous cancer has aroused a growing interest. The aim of this review is to look over the most recent data regarding the connection between capsaicin and muco-cutaneous cancers, with emphasis on melanoma and muco-cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Dietary Management of Skin Health: The Role of Genistein
Nutrients 2017, 9(6), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9060622 - 17 Jun 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
In women, aging and declining estrogen levels are associated with several cutaneous changes, many of which can be reversed or improved by estrogen supplementation. Two estrogen receptors—α and β—have been cloned and found in various tissue types. Epidermal thinning, declining dermal collagen content, [...] Read more.
In women, aging and declining estrogen levels are associated with several cutaneous changes, many of which can be reversed or improved by estrogen supplementation. Two estrogen receptors—α and β—have been cloned and found in various tissue types. Epidermal thinning, declining dermal collagen content, diminished skin moisture, decreased laxity, and impaired wound healing have been reported in postmenopausal women. Experimental and clinical studies in postmenopausal conditions indicate that estrogen deprivation is associated with dryness, atrophy, fine wrinkling, and poor wound healing. The isoflavone genistein binds to estrogen receptor β and has been reported to improve skin changes. This review article will focus on the effects of genistein on skin health. Full article
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