Special Issue "The Role of Food-Derived Bioactive Compounds in Modulating Inflammasome"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2021) | Viewed by 12950

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giuseppe Annunziata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples Federico II, Via Domenico Montesano 49, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: food science; nutraceutical; nutrition; metabolism; polyphenols; antioxidants; oxidative stress; inflammation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Gian Carlo Tenore
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples "Federico II", Via Domenico Montesano, 49, 80131 Napoli, Italy
Interests: nutraceuticals; bioactive compounds; food science and thecnology; chromatography; food safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Ettore Novellino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples Federico II, Via D. Montesano 49, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: nutraceuticals; antioxidants; food supplements; pharmaceutical chemistry; TMAO; metabolic syndrome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

it is widely accepted that inflammation can be interpreted with a dual and bidirectional meaning, since it can be considered as both cause and consequence of several chronic diseases. In this sense, a large number of studies described the close relationship between systemic/tissue inflammation and onset/development of many pathological conditions, first and foremost cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

In last decades, research in food-science, nutraceutical and nutrition fields widely described the numerous health-promoting effects of polyphenols, suggesting the importance of proper consumption of polyphenol-rich foods and/or nutraceutical supplementation in the management of several inflammatory-associated chronic diseases. This evidence has been corroborated by epidemiological studies and basic researches highlighting the ability of these bioactive compounds to directly influence the inflammatory response and modulate the immune system.

The present Special Issue welcomes the submission of papers either describing original research (in vitro, ex-vivo and animal-based studies or clinical trials) or scientific literature reviewing (including narrative reviews, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and opinion papers) covering novel insights on the effects of polyphenols in modulating inflammation. Papers describing novel mechanisms of action/targets will be profoundly appreciated. 

Dr. Giuseppe Annunziata
Prof. Gian Carlo Tenore
Prof. Ettore Novellino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Food-derived bioactive compounds
  • Nutraceutical
  • Polyphenols
  • Inflammation
  • Interleukins
  • Cytokines

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Olea europea L. Leaves and Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Petals Extracts: Herbal Mix from Cardiovascular Network Target to Gut Motility Dysfunction Application
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 463; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030463 - 21 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1142
Abstract
It is well known that diet and nutrition play a critical role in the etiopathogenesis of many disorders. On the other hand, nutrients or bioactive compounds can specifically target and control various aspects of the mechanism underlying the pathology itself, and, in this [...] Read more.
It is well known that diet and nutrition play a critical role in the etiopathogenesis of many disorders. On the other hand, nutrients or bioactive compounds can specifically target and control various aspects of the mechanism underlying the pathology itself, and, in this context, diseases related to intestinal motility disorders stand out. The Herbal Mix (HM) consisting of Olea europea L. leaf (OEE) and Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (HSE) extracts (13:2) has been proven to be a promising nutraceutical option for many diseases, but its potential in inflammatory-driven gastrointestinal disorders is still unexplored. In this study, HM effects on guinea-pig ileum and colon contractility (induced or spontaneous) and on human iNOS activity, as well as on human colorectal adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells, were studied. Results showed that the HM can control the ileum and colon contractility without blocking the progression of the food bolus, can selectively inhibit iNOS and possesses a strong pro-apoptotic activity towards Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, the present results suggest that, in some diseases, such as those related to motility disorders, an appropriate nutritional approach can be accompanied by a correct use of nutraceuticals that could help not only in ameliorating the symptoms but also in preventing more severe, cancer-related conditions. Full article
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Article
The Short-Term Effect of Prunes in Improving Bone in Men
Nutrients 2022, 14(2), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020276 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1828
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a major health concern in aging populations, where 54% of the U.S. population aged 50 and older have low bone mineral density (BMD). Increases in inflammation and oxidative stress play a major role in the development of osteoporosis. Men are at [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a major health concern in aging populations, where 54% of the U.S. population aged 50 and older have low bone mineral density (BMD). Increases in inflammation and oxidative stress play a major role in the development of osteoporosis. Men are at a greater risk of mortality due to osteoporosis-related fractures. Our earlier findings in rodent male and female models of osteoporosis, as well as postmenopausal women strongly suggest the efficacy of prunes (dried plum) in reducing inflammation and preventing/reversing bone loss. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of two doses of prunes, daily, on biomarkers of inflammation and bone metabolism in men with some degree of bone loss (BMD; t-score between −0.1 and −2.5 SD), for three months. Thirty-five men between the ages of 55 and 80 years were randomized into one of three groups: 100 g prunes, 50 g prunes, or control. Consumption of 100 g prunes led to a significant decrease in serum osteocalcin (p < 0.001). Consumption of 50 g prunes led to significant decreases in serum osteoprotegerin (OPG) (p = 0.003) and serum osteocalcin (p = 0.040), and an increase in the OPG:RANKL ratio (p = 0.041). Regular consumption of either 100 g or 50 g prunes for three months may positively affect bone turnover. Full article
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Article
Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Coffee Brew Evaluated after Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4368; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124368 - 05 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1905
Abstract
Coffee contains human health-related molecules, namely polyphenols that possess a wide range of pharmacological functions, and their intake is associated with reduced colon cancer risk. This study aimed to assess the changes in the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of coffee after simulated gastrointestinal [...] Read more.
Coffee contains human health-related molecules, namely polyphenols that possess a wide range of pharmacological functions, and their intake is associated with reduced colon cancer risk. This study aimed to assess the changes in the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of coffee after simulated gastrointestinal digestion. The evaluation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line and three in vitro spectrophotometric assays were performed to determine the antioxidant activity of the samples. Characterization of coffee composition was also assessed through a Q-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. The results highlighted that the levels of polyphenols in the digested coffee brews were higher than those of the non-digested ones. All assayed samples decreased the levels of intracellular ROS when compared to untreated cells, while digested coffee samples exhibited higher antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content than not-digested coffee samples. Digested coffee samples showed a higher reduction in interleukin-6 levels than the not-digested samples in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HT-29 cells treated for 48 h and fewer cytotoxic effects in the MTT assay. Overall, our findings suggest that coffee may exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and the digestion process may be able to release compounds with higher bioactivity. Full article
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Article
Caffeine Has Different Immunomodulatory Effect on the Cytokine Expression and NLRP3 Inflammasome Function in Various Human Macrophage Subpopulations
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2409; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072409 - 14 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1780
Abstract
Besides its well-known psychoactive effects, caffeine has a broad range of actions. It regulates several physiological mechanisms as well as modulates both native and adaptive immune responses by various ways. Although caffeine is assumed to be a negative regulator of inflammation, the effect [...] Read more.
Besides its well-known psychoactive effects, caffeine has a broad range of actions. It regulates several physiological mechanisms as well as modulates both native and adaptive immune responses by various ways. Although caffeine is assumed to be a negative regulator of inflammation, the effect on the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines is highly controversial. Macrophages are major mediators of inflammatory responses; however, the various subpopulations develop different effects ranging from the initiation to the resolution of inflammation. Here we report a comparative analysis of the effect of caffeine on two subpopulations of human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), resulting in M-MΦs and GM-MΦs, respectively. We showed that although TNF-α secretion was downregulated in both LPS-activated MΦ subtypes by caffeine, the secretion of IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β as well as the expression of Nod-like receptors was enhanced in M-MΦs, while it did not change in GM-MΦs. We showed that caffeine (1) altered adenosine receptor expression, (2) changed Akt/AMPK/mTOR signaling pathways, and (3) inhibited STAT1/IL-10 signaling axis in M-MΦs. We hypothesized that these alterations play an important modulatory role in the upregulation of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in LPS-activated M-MΦs following caffeine treatment. Full article
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Article
Acceptability and Feasibility of a 13-Week Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial Testing the Effects of Incremental Doses of Beetroot Juice in Overweight and Obese Older Adults
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030769 - 26 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1790
Abstract
Nitrate-rich food can increase nitric oxide production and improve vascular and brain functions. This study examines the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) testing the effects of prolonged consumption of different doses of dietary nitrate (NO3) in the form [...] Read more.
Nitrate-rich food can increase nitric oxide production and improve vascular and brain functions. This study examines the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) testing the effects of prolonged consumption of different doses of dietary nitrate (NO3) in the form of beetroot juice (BJ) in overweight and obese older participants. A single-blind, four-arm parallel pilot RCT was conducted in 62 overweight and obese (30.4 ± 4 kg/m2) older participants (mean ± standard deviation (SD), 66 ± 4 years). Participants were randomized to: (1) high-NO3 (HN: 2 × 70 mL BJ/day) (2) medium-NO3 (MN: 70 mL BJ/day), (3) low-NO3 (LN: 70 mL BJ on alternate days) or (4) Placebo (PL: 70 mL of NO3-depleted BJ on alternate days), for 13 weeks. Compliance was checked by a daily log of consumed BJ, NO3 intake, and by measuring NO3 and NO2 concentrations in plasma, saliva, and urine samples. Fifty participants completed the study. Self-reported compliance to the interventions was >90%. There were significant positive linear relationships between NO3 dose and the increase in plasma and urinary NO3 concentration (R2 = 0.71, p < 0.001 and R2 = 0.46 p < 0.001, respectively), but relationships between NO3 dose and changes in salivary NO3 and NO2 were non-linear (R2 = 0.35, p = 0.002 and R2 = 0.23, p = 0.007, respectively). The results confirm the feasibility of prolonged BJ supplementation in older overweight and obese adults. Full article
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Review

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Review
Anti-Inflammatory and Active Biological Properties of the Plant-Derived Bioactive Compounds Luteolin and Luteolin 7-Glucoside
Nutrients 2022, 14(6), 1155; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14061155 - 09 Mar 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1555
Abstract
Flavonoids are interesting molecules synthetized by plants. They can be found abundantly in seeds and fruits, determining the color, flavor, and other organoleptic characteristics, as well as contributing to important nutritional aspects. Beyond these characteristics, due to their biochemical properties and characteristics, they [...] Read more.
Flavonoids are interesting molecules synthetized by plants. They can be found abundantly in seeds and fruits, determining the color, flavor, and other organoleptic characteristics, as well as contributing to important nutritional aspects. Beyond these characteristics, due to their biochemical properties and characteristics, they can be considered bioactive compounds. Several interesting studies have demonstrated their biological activity in different cellular and physiological processes in high-order organisms including humans. The flavonoid molecular structure confers the capability of reacting with and neutralizing reactive oxygen species (ROS), behaving as scavengers in all processes generating this class of molecules, such as UV irradiation, a process widely present in plant physiology. Importantly, the recent scientific literature has demonstrated that flavonoids, in human physiology, are active compounds acting not only as scavengers but also with the important role of counteracting the inflammation process. Among the wide variety of flavonoid molecules, significant results have been shown by investigating the role of the flavones luteolin and luteolin-7-O-glucoside (LUT-7G). For these compounds, experimental results demonstrated an interesting anti-inflammatory action, both in vitro and in vivo, in the interaction with JAK/STAT3, NF-κB, and other pathways described in this review. We also describe the effects in metabolic pathways connected with inflammation, such as cellular glycolysis, diabetes, lipid peroxidation, and effects in cancer cells. Moreover, the inhibition of inflammatory pathway in endothelial tissue, as well as the NLRP3 inflammasome assembly, demonstrates a key role in the progression of such phenomena. Since these micronutrient molecules can be obtained from food, their biochemical properties open new perspectives with respect to the long-term health status of healthy individuals, as well as their use as a coadjutant treatment in specific diseases. Full article
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Review
Modulatory Properties of Food and Nutraceutical Components Targeting NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030490 - 23 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1740
Abstract
Inflammasomes are key intracellular multimeric proteins able to initiate the cellular inflammatory signaling pathway. NLRP3 inflammasome represents one of the main protein complexes involved in the development of inflammatory events, and its activity has been largely demonstrated to be connected with inflammatory or [...] Read more.
Inflammasomes are key intracellular multimeric proteins able to initiate the cellular inflammatory signaling pathway. NLRP3 inflammasome represents one of the main protein complexes involved in the development of inflammatory events, and its activity has been largely demonstrated to be connected with inflammatory or autoinflammatory disorders, including diabetes, gouty arthritis, liver fibrosis, Alzheimer’s disease, respiratory syndromes, atherosclerosis, and cancer initiation. In recent years, it has been demonstrated how dietary intake and nutritional status represent important environmental elements that can modulate metabolic inflammation, since food matrices are an important source of several bioactive compounds. In this review, an updated status of knowledge regarding food bioactive compounds as NLRP3 inflammasome modulators is discussed. Several chemical classes, namely polyphenols, organosulfurs, terpenes, fatty acids, proteins, amino acids, saponins, sterols, polysaccharides, carotenoids, vitamins, and probiotics, have been shown to possess NLRP3 inflammasome-modulating activity through in vitro and in vivo assays, mainly demonstrating an anti-NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Plant foods are particularly rich in important bioactive compounds, each of them can have different effects on the pathway of inflammatory response, confirming the importance of the nutritional pattern (food model) as a whole rather than any single nutrient or functional compound. Full article
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