Special Issue "Chemosensory Perception in Food"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensory and Consumer Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 October 2021) | Viewed by 12147

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Luisa Torri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Gastronomic Sciences, Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II, 9, 12042 Pollenzo, CN, Italy
Interests: consumer science; food sensory analysis; chemosensory perception; individual differences; novel foods; sustainable food systems; food shelf life; food packaging; electronic nose
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Understanding chemosensory perception in food and its role in shaping consumer preferences could contribute to the development of both successful innovative food products and strategies for promoting healthy and sustainable eating behavior.

This Special Issue will include studies describing the taste, olfactory, and trigeminal perception of food and/or the physiological, cognitive, psychological, and genetic factors affecting it. Research works investigating the individual differences in chemosensory perception and its implications on consumer food preferences and health are strongly welcomed. Cross-cultural studies are of particular interest. This includes papers on responsiveness measurements based on sensory and non-sensory (e.g., neuroimaging) methods and their correlation with instrumental techniques (e.g., VOC analysis, e-nose, e-tongue, etc.).

We aim to expand the knowledge on chemosensory perception in food with an interdisciplinary perspective. We encourage authors to submit original research articles or reviews addressing the topic from different disciplines, including (but not limited to) sensory science, consumer science, food science and technology, psychology, neuroscience, nutrition, and genetics.

Prof. Dr. Luisa Torri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Taste, olfactory, and trigeminal perception 
  • Individual variability 
  • Psychological factors 
  • Genetic influence 
  • Chemosensory learning and memory 
  • Chemosensory dysfunctions 
  • Consumers preferences and health 
  • Cross-cultural studies 
  • Neuroimaging of chemosensory perception 
  • Instrumental techniques (VOC analysis, e-nose, e-tongue, etc.)

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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Article
Sensory Capacities and Eating Behavior: Intriguing Results from a Large Cohort of Italian Individuals
Foods 2022, 11(5), 735; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11050735 - 02 Mar 2022
Viewed by 483
Abstract
Eating behavior (EB) is a complex system influenced by many factors, but an undisputed role is played by the senses. In this work, we examined the effect of the sensory capacities on EB in 1152 Italian adult individuals. After administering a questionnaire on [...] Read more.
Eating behavior (EB) is a complex system influenced by many factors, but an undisputed role is played by the senses. In this work, we examined the effect of the sensory capacities on EB in 1152 Italian adult individuals. After administering a questionnaire on EB and assessing sensory performance through standard audiometric, olfactory, and taste tests, the prevalence of reduced sensory capacities (RSCs) and the correlation with selected risk factors were calculated. Regression models, structural equation modelling, and conditional recursive partitioning were used to investigate the relationship between variables. Around 70% of the subjects show reduced capacities in at least one sense, with taste being the most prevalent (55.21%). Male sex, aging, and low educational level are risk factors for RSCs. The increased number of senses with reduced capacities is a predictor of diminished food adventurousness and lower liking for vegetables, fish, and alcoholic beverages, while reduced capacities (RCs) in taste is a predictor of lower liking for alcoholic beverages and sweets. Overall, in addition to providing an overall picture of RSCs in Italian samples, our study reveals the association of RSCs with EB variables. This finding could have a relevant role in influencing individuals’ dietary habits and, therefore, health status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Relationships between Intensity and Liking for Chemosensory Stimuli in Food Models: A Large-Scale Consumer Segmentation
Foods 2022, 11(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11010005 - 21 Dec 2021
Viewed by 872
Abstract
This study, which was conducted as part of the Italian Taste project, was aimed at exploring the relationship between actual liking and sensory perception in four food models. Each food model was spiked with four levels of prototypical tastant (i.e., citric acid, sucrose, [...] Read more.
This study, which was conducted as part of the Italian Taste project, was aimed at exploring the relationship between actual liking and sensory perception in four food models. Each food model was spiked with four levels of prototypical tastant (i.e., citric acid, sucrose, sodium chloride, capsaicin) to elicit a target sensation (TS) at an increasing perceived intensity. Participants (N = 2258; 59% women, aged 18–60) provided demographic information, a stated liking for 40 different foods/beverages, and their responsiveness to tastants in water. A food-specific Pearson’s coefficient was calculated individually to estimate the relationship between actual liking and TS responsiveness. Considering the relationship magnitude, consumers were grouped into four food-specific clusters, depending on whether they showed a strong negative (SNC), a weak negative (WNC), a weak positive (WPC), or a strong positive correlation (SPC). Overall, the degree of liking raised in parallel with sweetness responsiveness, fell as sourness and pungency perception increased, and showed an inverted U-shape relationship with saltiness. The SNC clusters generally perceived TSs at higher intensities, except for sourness. Clusters were validated by associating the level of stated liking towards food/beverages; however, some unexpected indications emerged: adding sugar to coffee or preferring spicy foods differentiated those presenting positive correlations from those showing negative correlations. Our findings constitute a step towards a more comprehensive understanding of food preferences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Cognitive Keys in Psychophysical Estimation of Chemosensory Perception in University Students
Foods 2021, 10(12), 3134; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10123134 - 17 Dec 2021
Viewed by 526
Abstract
Psychophysical methods allow us to measure the relationship between stimuli and sensory perception. Of these, Detection Threshold (DT) allows us to know the minimum concentration to produce taste identification. Given this, we wonder whether, for example, wine tasting experts are more capable of [...] Read more.
Psychophysical methods allow us to measure the relationship between stimuli and sensory perception. Of these, Detection Threshold (DT) allows us to know the minimum concentration to produce taste identification. Given this, we wonder whether, for example, wine tasting experts are more capable of perceiving their sensory properties than other people, or whether they can distinguish them because they are better able to “describe” them. To verify this, this study analyses the influence of having prior knowledge of the name astringency and, failing that, to detect it and distinguish it between the four basic tastes. One-hundred-and-sixty-two university students with an average age of 19.43 (SD = 2.55) years were assigned to three experimental conditions: an experimental group (G.2) without previous knowledge of the name astringency and with alimentary satiety, and two control groups, both with previous knowledge of the name, these being G.1, with satiety, and G.3, with hunger. DT was collected for the four basic tastes and astringencies. Results showed significant differences in the identification of astringency, being the least identified experimental group with respect to the control groups. It is striking that G.2, without prior knowledge of the name, identified astringency as a bitter taste in most cases. This supports our hypothesis of the importance of attending to linguistic cognitive processes when psychophysically estimating taste in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Food Neophobia, Odor and Taste Sensitivity, and Overall Flavor Perception in Food
Foods 2021, 10(12), 3122; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10123122 - 16 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 722
Abstract
Smell, which allows us to gather information about the hedonic value of an odor, is affected by many factors. This study aimed to assess the relationship among individual factors, odor sensitivity, and enjoyment, and to evaluate how overall flavor perception and liking in [...] Read more.
Smell, which allows us to gather information about the hedonic value of an odor, is affected by many factors. This study aimed to assess the relationship among individual factors, odor sensitivity, and enjoyment, and to evaluate how overall flavor perception and liking in actual food samples are affected by odor sensitivity. A total of 749 subjects, from four different Italian regions, participated in the study. The olfactory capabilities test on four odors (anise, banana, mint, and pine), as well as PROP (6-n-prpyl-2-thiouracil) status and food neophobia were assessed. The subjects were clustered into three groups of odor sensitivity, based on the perceived intensity of anise. The liking and intensity of the overall flavor were evaluated for four chocolate puddings with increasing sweetness (C1, C2, C3, and C4). The individual variables significantly affected the perceived intensity and liking of the odors. Even if all of the odor sensitivity groups perceived the more intensely flavored samples as the C1 and C4 chocolate puddings, the high-sensitivity group scored the global flavor of all of the samples as more intense than the low-sensitivity group. The low-sensitive subjects evaluated the liking of the sweeter samples with higher scores than the moderate-sensitive subjects, whereas the high-sensitive subjects gave intermediate scores. In conclusion, odor sensitivity plays a pivotal role in the perception and liking of real food products; this has to be taken into account in the formulation of new products, suitable for particular categories with reduced olfactory abilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Relationship between Sensory Attributes, (Dis) Liking and Volatile Organic Composition of Gorgonzola PDO Cheese
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2791; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112791 - 12 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 757
Abstract
Blue-veined cheese tends to polarize the consumers’ affective responses due to its strong flavor. This study aims to: (i) explore the consumers’ sensory perceptions and liking of Gorgonzola PDO cheese; (ii) identify the sensory drivers of acceptance for Gorgonzola in the function of [...] Read more.
Blue-veined cheese tends to polarize the consumers’ affective responses due to its strong flavor. This study aims to: (i) explore the consumers’ sensory perceptions and liking of Gorgonzola PDO cheese; (ii) identify the sensory drivers of acceptance for Gorgonzola in the function of the cheese style; (iii) characterize them by the volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and (iv) explore the relationships of the VOCs with sensory perception and liking. Six samples of Gorgonzola cheese differing in style (sweet vs. piquant), aging time (70–95 days), and production process (artisanal vs. industrial) were evaluated by 358 subjects (46% males, 18–77 years) using liking and Rate-All-That-Apply (RATA) tests. The cheese VOCs were measured by SPME/GC-MS. Liking was significantly higher for the sweet cheese than for the piquant cheese and for the artisanal cheese than for the industrial samples. Penalty Analysis showed that ‘creamy’, ‘sweet’, ‘nutty’, and ‘salty’ were significant drivers of liking while the ‘soapy’ and ‘ammonia’ flavors turned out to be drivers of disliking. Fifty-three VOCs were identified. Regression models revealed the significant highest associations between the VOCs and ‘ammonia’, ‘pungent’, ‘soapy’, and ‘moldy’ flavors. A good association was also found with the consumers’ liking. The identification of the sensory drivers of (dis) liking and their relationship with the VOCs of Gorgonzola opens up a new understanding of the consumers’ blue-veined cheese preferences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Tartary Buckwheat: A New Plant-Based Ingredient to Enrich Corn-Based Gluten-Free Formulations
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2613; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112613 - 28 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 667
Abstract
Tartary buckwheat is a pseudocereal receiving increasing attention as a minor crop interesting for agrobiodiversity conservation and sustainability. It is rich in bioactive substances which, however, may lead to sensory properties undesirable to the consumer, such as bitterness and astringency. The aim was [...] Read more.
Tartary buckwheat is a pseudocereal receiving increasing attention as a minor crop interesting for agrobiodiversity conservation and sustainability. It is rich in bioactive substances which, however, may lead to sensory properties undesirable to the consumer, such as bitterness and astringency. The aim was to evaluate consumers’ perception and overall liking of food products enriched with tartary or common buckwheat. A total of 120 consumers (56% women) aged 20–60 years (mean age ± SD: 38.8 ± 13.0 years) evaluated six samples of a corn-based gluten-free formulation enriched by increasing concentrations (20%, 30%, 40%) of either common (CB) or tartary buckwheat (TB) flour for overall liking and appropriateness of sensory properties. Results showed significant differences (p < 0.0001) in liking among samples. Considering all subjects, liking decreased with the increase of tartary buckwheat additions, although TB20 and TB30 samples were well accepted and comparable to all CB samples. TB40 was the least liked product. Two clusters of consumers showing opposite behaviours according to liking were found. One cluster (30%) showed an increased liking with the increasing amount of tartary buckwheat. These results show that by keeping the concentration of tartary buckwheat up to 30%, it is possible to develop new products accepted by consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Evaluation of Sensory Quality for Taiwanese Specialty Teas with Cold Infusion Using CATA and Temporal CATA by Taiwanese Consumers
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2344; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102344 - 01 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 848
Abstract
The market size of varied carbonated teas and bottled ready-to-drink tea products in Taiwan has surpassed that of traditional Taiwan tea with hot infusion. The consumption behavior of Taiwanese consumers for new and varied types of cold infusion tea products has also differed [...] Read more.
The market size of varied carbonated teas and bottled ready-to-drink tea products in Taiwan has surpassed that of traditional Taiwan tea with hot infusion. The consumption behavior of Taiwanese consumers for new and varied types of cold infusion tea products has also differed from that of traditional hot infusion ones. More kinds of Taiwan tea with different fermentation levels are gradually being used as raw materials for various cold infusion tea products. Therefore, to study consumers’ responses towards cold-brewed tea has become more important for the market of tea in Taiwan. This study recruited Taiwanese consumers to taste seven Taiwanese specialty tea infusions with various degrees of fermentation, and their opinions were gathered by questionnaires composed of check-all-that-apply (CATA), and temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA) questions and hedonic scales. We found that both CATA and TCATA data agreed that the sensory features of unfermented and lightly semi-fermented tea infusions could be plainly distinguished from the ones of heavily semi-fermented and fully fermented teas based on correspondence analyses. Through CATA and TCATA, the sensory characteristics of the cold-brewed tea of various fermentation degrees could be clearly identified. The first-hand information of cold tea beverages analyzed through this study could be useful for the development of the market in Taiwan. The proper level of bitterness, astringency, fresh tea leaf flavor, and late sweetness were the essential qualities of cold infusions brewed from lightly fermented teas, which could be the best raw materials for production of cold tea beverages to satisfy as many consumers as possible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Taste Responses to Chocolate Pudding with Different Sucrose Concentrations through Physiological and Explicit Self-Reported Measures
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1527; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071527 - 02 Jul 2021
Viewed by 723
Abstract
The past few decades have seen significant methodological and theoretical change within sensory science, including in food sciences. The physiological reaction to the Autonomous Nervous System (ANS) provides insightful information in interpreting consumers’ sensory and affective reactions. In this regard, we investigated how [...] Read more.
The past few decades have seen significant methodological and theoretical change within sensory science, including in food sciences. The physiological reaction to the Autonomous Nervous System (ANS) provides insightful information in interpreting consumers’ sensory and affective reactions. In this regard, we investigated how explicit responses of liking and perceived intensity of sensory features (sweet, bitter, and astringency) and implicit objective physiological responses of Heart Rate (HR) and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) are modulated when varying the sweetness (sucrose concentration with 38; 83; 119; 233 g/kg) level in a cocoa-based product (dark chocolate pudding) and their relationship. The demographic effects on responses were also investigated. Results showed the effects of the sucrose concentration levels on liking and perceived intensity of all the sensory characteristics and on HR responses, which highlighted a significant effect of the sucrose concentration level. As regards the relationship between variables, a significant positive effect was found for the sucrose concentration level 3, where an increase in HR leads to an increase in liking; for the perceived bitterness, a significant positive effect of HR for the sucrose concentration level 1; and for the perceived astringent, a significant positive effect of HR for the sucrose concentration level 2. While we found no significant main effect of gender on our dependent variables, the results highlight a significant main effect of age, increasing the adult population responses. The present research helps to understand better the relationship between explicit and implicit sensory study variables with foods. Furthermore, it has managerial applications for chocolate product developers. The level of sweetness that might be optimal to satisfy at the explicit level (liking) and the implicit level (HR or emotional valence) is identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Potential of Probiotic Frozen Blackcurrant Products: Consumer Preference, Physicochemical Characterization, and Cell Viability
Foods 2021, 10(4), 792; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040792 - 07 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 735
Abstract
Blackcurrant is a healthy, affordable, and traditionally gardened berry that, thus far, has been underused in food applications. From the consumers’ point of view, the acidic taste of blackcurrants is a challenge; therefore, these berries have mainly been utilized for sugary juice production. [...] Read more.
Blackcurrant is a healthy, affordable, and traditionally gardened berry that, thus far, has been underused in food applications. From the consumers’ point of view, the acidic taste of blackcurrants is a challenge; therefore, these berries have mainly been utilized for sugary juice production. This research study aimed to develop a frozen vegan blackcurrant product with pleasant sensory properties and potential probiotic function. A candidate probiotic, Lactoplantibacillus plantarum Q823, was used in the manufacturing process. The physicochemical properties, nutritional composition, and consumer preference for the developed product were assessed, as was the viability of L. plantarum Q823 during storage time and in an in vitro gastrointestinal model. Consumers (n = 71) perceived the developed product to be pleasant. L. plantarum Q823 had high viability counts (log colony forming units (cfu) g−1 7.0 ± 0.38) in the final product, although the viability of L. plantarum Q823 during storage time needs to be enhanced to obtain a probiotic product. Thus, within an optimized formulation, blackcurrant berries represent a potential raw material for functional frozen food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Quantitative Analysis of Pyrazines and Their Perceptual Interactions in Soy Sauce Aroma Type Baijiu
Foods 2021, 10(2), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020441 - 17 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1434
Abstract
Pyrazines are important compounds in soy sauce aroma type Baijiu (SSAB). In this work, a total of 16 pyrazines were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS/MS) in SSAB. The quantitative results showed that 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine, 2,6-dimethylpyrazine and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine were [...] Read more.
Pyrazines are important compounds in soy sauce aroma type Baijiu (SSAB). In this work, a total of 16 pyrazines were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS/MS) in SSAB. The quantitative results showed that 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine, 2,6-dimethylpyrazine and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine were the three most concentrated pyrazines. The highest odor activity value (OAV) was determined for 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine. Quantitative analysis combined with descriptive sensory analysis revealed that sub-threshold pyrazines (2,3-dimethylpyrazine, 2,3-diethylpyrazine, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine and 2-acetyl-3-methylpyrazine) are significantly correlated with the roasted aroma in SSAB. Our study focused on the impact of sub-threshold pyrazines on the perception of roasted aroma in SSAB. The effect of the sub-threshold pyrazines was detected by the addition of various pyrazines in SSAB samples, despite their sub-threshold concentrations. Furthermore, the presence of sub-threshold pyrazines in dilute alcohol solution resulted in a significant reduction in the odor thresholds of supra-threshold pyrazines. Sensory investigation indicated that pyrazines have a synergistic effect on the perception of roasted aroma. The results highlighted the contribution of some pyrazines to the roasted aroma in SSAB despite their sub-threshold concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Consumer Likings of Different Miracle Fruit Products on Different Sour Foods
Foods 2021, 10(2), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020406 - 12 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 758
Abstract
Miracle fruit has a high potential as a healthy sweetening enhancer, due to its powerful antioxidant capacity and its unique ability to transform sour taste into sweet taste. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of different miracle fruit products [...] Read more.
Miracle fruit has a high potential as a healthy sweetening enhancer, due to its powerful antioxidant capacity and its unique ability to transform sour taste into sweet taste. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of different miracle fruit products on the likings of different sour foods. In total, 200 healthy adults (women 55%, 18–65 years old) evaluated five sour foods (apple, goat cheese, lemonade, yogurt, pickle) before and after miracle fruit application. Four commercial miracle fruit products (pills-Y; G; M, powder-P) were randomly assigned to each panelist. The pre- and post-test likings for overall, flavor, texture, and aftertaste were evaluated by using a nine-point scale. The “meeting expectations” was evaluated only in the post-tests. After miracle fruit administration, all the liking scores in yogurt, goat cheese, and apple increased; in contrast, lemonade and pickle liking scores decreased, except lemonade’s texture with the P product. The Tukey post hoc test showed that the pre-to-post increments for overall, flavor, and texture likings in yogurt and in overall and flavor likings in apple using M product were significantly higher than using other products (p < 0.05). This study suggests that miracle fruit application can be an effective method for im-proving consumer likings for yogurt, goat cheese, and apple. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Article
Sisymbrium Officinale (the Singers’ Plant) as an Ingredient: Analysis of Somatosensory Active Volatile Isothiocyanates in Model Food and Drinks
Foods 2021, 10(2), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020308 - 03 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1216
Abstract
Sisymbrium officinale (L.) Scop. (hedge mustard) is a wild common plant of the Brassicaceae family. It is known as “the singers’ plant” for its traditional use in treating aphonia and vocal disability. The plant is rich in glucosinolates and isothiocyanates; the latter has [...] Read more.
Sisymbrium officinale (L.) Scop. (hedge mustard) is a wild common plant of the Brassicaceae family. It is known as “the singers’ plant” for its traditional use in treating aphonia and vocal disability. The plant is rich in glucosinolates and isothiocyanates; the latter has been demonstrated to be a strong agonist in vitro of the Transient Receptor Potential Ankirine 1 (TRPA1) channel, which is involved in the somatosensory perception of pungency as well as in the nociception pathway of inflammatory pain. Volatile ITCs are released by the enzymatic or chemical hydrolysis of GLSs (glucosinolates) during sample crushing and/or by the mastication of fresh plant tissues when the plant is used as an ingredient. Some functional food and drink model preparations have been realised: honey enriched with seeds and flowers, infusions, cold drink (voice drink), artisanal beer, and a fermented tea (kombucha). Using SPME-GCMS chromatography, we analysed samples of the plant and of the food preparations adopting conditions that simulate the release of isothiocyanates (ITCs) during oral assumption. Two active compounds, iso-propylisothiocyanate and 2-butylisothiocyanate, have been assayed. The concentration of ITCs varies according to temperature, pH, grinding conditions, and different plant organs used. Kombucha-type fermentation seems to eliminate the ITCs, whereas they are retained in beer. The ITCs’ concentration is higher when entire seeds and flowers are used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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Review

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Review
Impact of Nutritional Intervention on Taste Perception—A Scoping Review
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2747; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112747 - 09 Nov 2021
Viewed by 738
Abstract
The aim of the present scoping review was to evaluate the impact of experimental meal loads or observational diet changes/habits on taste tests in both healthy subjects and patients. A systematic search performed in PubMed, Scopus, and Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web [...] Read more.
The aim of the present scoping review was to evaluate the impact of experimental meal loads or observational diet changes/habits on taste tests in both healthy subjects and patients. A systematic search performed in PubMed, Scopus, and Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science electronic databases retrieved, respectively 2981, 6258, and 7555 articles from January 2000 to December 2020. A total of 17 articles were included for full-text review. Literature results were stratified according to the observational/interventional approach, the involvement of healthy subjects or patients, the taste test, and the meal/dietary changes. The present scoping review reinforced the notions postulating that certain taste tests (for example focusing on fatty acid, salt, or sugar) might be specifically influenced by the nutritional intervention and that other ones might be susceptible to a wide span of changes beyond the extent of tastant included in the specific food changes. This could also depend on the inhomogeneity of literature trend: The short duration of the intervention or the random type of meal load, unsuitability of the taste test chosen, and the presence of underlying disorders. Future studies for a better comprehension of taste tests reliability in relation to specific food changes are thus to be fostered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemosensory Perception in Food)
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