Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics

A special issue of Fluids (ISSN 2311-5521). This special issue belongs to the section "Mathematical and Computational Fluid Mechanics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2020) | Viewed by 60262

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Special Issue Editor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, 201 General Academic Building, Stillwater, OK 74078-5016, USA
Interests: fluid mechanics; complex systems; pattern formation; partial differential equations; non-Newtonian fluids; fluid–structure interaction; hydrodynamic stability; non-equilibrium thermodynamics; vortex induced oscillations; rheology; pathological flows; network analysis; philosophy of science; sustainability and science and creativity in mathematics and science
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, the field of computational fluid dynamics has made significant advances in enabling advanced computing architectures to understand many phenomena in biological, geophysical, and engineering fluid flows. Almost all research areas in fluids use numerical methods at various complexities: from molecular to continuum descriptions; from laminar to turbulent regimes; from low-speed to hypersonic, from stencil-based computations to meshless approaches; from local basis functions to global expansions, as well as from 1st-order approximation to high order and spectral accuracy. Many successful efforts have been put forth in dynamic adaptation strategies, e.g., adaptive mesh refinement and multiresolution representation approaches. Furthermore, with recent advances in artificial intelligence and heterogeneous computing, broader fluids community has gained momentum to revisit and investigate such practices. In this Special Issue, we aim to bring together researchers to provide a state of the art overview of the current investigations and topics on computational fluid dynamics.

Dr. Omer San
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • computational fluid dynamics
  • finite difference, finite element, finite volume methods
  • spectral difference, spectral element, spectral volume methods
  • discontinuous Galerkin methods
  • lattice Boltzmann method
  • smoothed particle hydrodynamics
  • immersed boundary methods
  • multigrid methods
  • wavelets
  • adaptive mesh refinement
  • meshless methods
  • shock capturing
  • hybrid dissipative and non-dissipative approaches
  • high performance scientific computing
  • heterogeneous computing
  • quantum computing
  • synchronous and asynchronous algorithms
  • numerical linear algebra
  • turbulence modeling
  • intelligent numerical methods
  • uncertainty quantification

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 141 KiB  
Editorial
Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics
by Omer San
Fluids 2020, 5(2), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids5020073 - 15 May 2020
Viewed by 1627
Abstract
In recent decades, the field of computational fluid dynamics has made significant advances in enabling advanced computing architectures to understand many phenomena in biological, geophysical, and engineering fluid flows [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

17 pages, 5577 KiB  
Article
Liquid-Cooling System of an Aircraft Compression Ignition Engine: A CFD Analysis
by Alessandro Coclite, Maria Faruoli, Annarita Viggiano, Paolo Caso and Vinicio Magi
Fluids 2020, 5(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids5020071 - 13 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3335
Abstract
The present work deals with an analysis of the cooling system for a two-stroke aircraft engine with compression ignition. This analysis is carried out by means of a 3D finite-volume RANS equations solver with k- ϵ closure. Three different cooling system geometries [...] Read more.
The present work deals with an analysis of the cooling system for a two-stroke aircraft engine with compression ignition. This analysis is carried out by means of a 3D finite-volume RANS equations solver with k- ϵ closure. Three different cooling system geometries are critically compared with a discussion on the capabilities and limitations of each technical solution. A first configuration of such a system is considered and analyzed by evaluating the pressure loss across the system as a function of the inlet mass-flow rate. Moreover, the velocity and vorticity patterns are analyzed to highlight the features of the flow structure. Thermal effects on the engine structure are also taken into account and the cooling system performance is assessed as a function of both the inlet mass-flow rate and the cylinder jackets temperatures. Then, by considering the main thermo-fluid dynamics features obtained in the case of the first configuration, two geometrical modifications are proposed to improve the efficiency of the system. As regards the first modification, the fluid intake is split in two manifolds by keeping the same total mass-flow rate. As regards the second configuration, a new single-inlet geometry is designed by inserting restrictions and enlargements within the cooling system to constrain the coolant flow through the cylinder jackets and by moving downstream the outflow section. It is shown that the second geometry modification achieves the best performances by improving the overall transferred heat of about 20% with respect to the first one, while keeping the three cylinders only slightly unevenly cooled. However, an increase of the flow characteristic loads occurs due to the geometrical restrictions and enlargements of the cooling system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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15 pages, 1045 KiB  
Article
Closure Learning for Nonlinear Model Reduction Using Deep Residual Neural Network
by Xuping Xie, Clayton Webster and Traian Iliescu
Fluids 2020, 5(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids5010039 - 23 Mar 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3289
Abstract
Developing accurate, efficient, and robust closure models is essential in the construction of reduced order models (ROMs) for realistic nonlinear systems, which generally require drastic ROM mode truncations. We propose a deep residual neural network (ResNet) closure learning framework for ROMs of nonlinear [...] Read more.
Developing accurate, efficient, and robust closure models is essential in the construction of reduced order models (ROMs) for realistic nonlinear systems, which generally require drastic ROM mode truncations. We propose a deep residual neural network (ResNet) closure learning framework for ROMs of nonlinear systems. The novel ResNet-ROM framework consists of two steps: (i) In the first step, we use ROM projection to filter the given nonlinear system and construct a spatially filtered ROM. This filtered ROM is low-dimensional, but is not closed. (ii) In the second step, we use ResNet to close the filtered ROM, i.e., to model the interaction between the resolved and unresolved ROM modes. We emphasize that in the new ResNet-ROM framework, data is used only to complement classical physical modeling (i.e., only in the closure modeling component), not to completely replace it. We also note that the new ResNet-ROM is built on general ideas of spatial filtering and deep learning and is independent of (restrictive) phenomenological arguments, e.g., of eddy viscosity type. The numerical experiments for the 1D Burgers equation show that the ResNet-ROM is significantly more accurate than the standard projection ROM. The new ResNet-ROM is also more accurate and significantly more efficient than other modern ROM closure models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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25 pages, 7416 KiB  
Article
Breaking the Kolmogorov Barrier in Model Reduction of Fluid Flows
by Shady E. Ahmed and Omer San
Fluids 2020, 5(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids5010026 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3713
Abstract
Turbulence modeling has been always a challenge, given the degree of underlying spatial and temporal complexity. In this paper, we propose the use of a partitioned reduced order modeling (ROM) approach for efficient and effective approximation of turbulent flows. A piecewise linear subspace [...] Read more.
Turbulence modeling has been always a challenge, given the degree of underlying spatial and temporal complexity. In this paper, we propose the use of a partitioned reduced order modeling (ROM) approach for efficient and effective approximation of turbulent flows. A piecewise linear subspace is tailored to capture the fine flow details in addition to the larger scales. We test the partitioned ROM for a decaying two-dimensional (2D) turbulent flow, known as 2D Kraichnan turbulence. The flow is initiated using an array of random vortices, corresponding to an arbitrary energy spectrum. We show that partitioning produces more accurate and stable results than standard ROM based on a global application of modal decomposition techniques. We also demonstrate the predictive capability of partitioned ROM through an energy spectrum analysis, where the recovered energy spectrum significantly converges to the full order model’s statistics with increased partitioning. Although the proposed approach incurs increased memory requirements to store the local basis functions for each partition, we emphasize that it permits the construction of more compact ROMs (i.e., of smaller dimension) with comparable accuracy, which in turn significantly reduces the online computational burden. Therefore, we consider that partitioning acts as a converter which reduces the cost of online deployment at the expense of offline and memory costs. Finally, we investigate the application of closure modeling to account for the effects of modal truncation on ROM dynamics. We illustrate that closure techniques can help to stabilize the results in the inertial range, but over-stabilization might take place in the dissipative range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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29 pages, 1759 KiB  
Article
A New Wall Model for Large Eddy Simulation of Separated Flows
by Ahmad Fakhari
Fluids 2019, 4(4), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4040197 - 28 Nov 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3148
Abstract
The aim of this work is to propose a new wall model for separated flows which is combined with large eddy simulation (LES) of the flow field in the whole domain. The model is designed to give reasonably good results for engineering applications [...] Read more.
The aim of this work is to propose a new wall model for separated flows which is combined with large eddy simulation (LES) of the flow field in the whole domain. The model is designed to give reasonably good results for engineering applications where the grid resolution is generally coarse. Since in practical applications a geometry can share body fitted and immersed boundaries, two different methodologies are introduced, one for body fitted grids, and one designed for immersed boundaries. The starting point of the models is the well known equilibrium stress model. The model for body fitted grid uses the dynamic evaluation of the von Kármán constant κ of Cabot and Moin (Flow, Turbulence and Combustion, 2000, 63, pp. 269–291) in a new fashion to modify the computation of shear velocity which is needed for evaluation of the wall shear stress and the near-wall velocity gradients based on the law of the wall to obtain strain rate tensors. The wall layer model for immersed boundaries is an extension of the work of Roman et al. (Physics of Fluids, 2009, 21, p. 101701) and uses a criteria based on the sign of the pressure gradient, instead of one based on the friction velocity at the projection point, to construct the velocity under an adverse pressure gradient and where the near-wall computational node is in the log region, in order to capture flow separation. The performance of the models is tested over two well-studied geometries, the isolated two-dimensional hill and the periodic two-dimensional hill, respectively. Sensitivity analysis of the models is also performed. Overall, the models are able to predict the first and second order statistics in a reasonable way, including the position and extension of the downward separation region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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32 pages, 12799 KiB  
Article
An Explicit Meshless Point Collocation Solver for Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations
by George C. Bourantas, Benjamin F. Zwick, Grand R. Joldes, Vassilios C. Loukopoulos, Angus C. R. Tavner, Adam Wittek and Karol Miller
Fluids 2019, 4(3), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4030164 - 3 Sep 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3082
Abstract
We present a strong form, meshless point collocation explicit solver for the numerical solution of the transient, incompressible, viscous Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in two dimensions. We numerically solve the governing flow equations in their stream function-vorticity formulation. We use a uniform Cartesian embedded [...] Read more.
We present a strong form, meshless point collocation explicit solver for the numerical solution of the transient, incompressible, viscous Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in two dimensions. We numerically solve the governing flow equations in their stream function-vorticity formulation. We use a uniform Cartesian embedded grid to represent the flow domain. We discretize the governing equations using the Meshless Point Collocation (MPC) method. We compute the spatial derivatives that appear in the governing flow equations, using a novel interpolation meshless scheme, the Discretization Corrected Particle Strength Exchange (DC PSE). We verify the accuracy of the numerical scheme for commonly used benchmark problems including lid-driven cavity flow, flow over a backward-facing step and unbounded flow past a cylinder. We have examined the applicability of the proposed scheme by considering flow cases with complex geometries, such as flow in a duct with cylindrical obstacles, flow in a bifurcated geometry, and flow past complex-shaped obstacles. Our method offers high accuracy and excellent computational efficiency as demonstrated by the verification examples, while maintaining a stable time step comparable to that used in unconditionally stable implicit methods. We estimate the stable time step using the Gershgorin circle theorem. The stable time step can be increased through the increase of the support domain of the weight function used in the DC PSE method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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18 pages, 7151 KiB  
Article
Synchronized Multiple Drop Impacts into a Deep Pool
by Manfredo Guilizzoni, Maurizio Santini and Stephanie Fest-Santini
Fluids 2019, 4(3), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4030141 - 27 Jul 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3195
Abstract
Drop impacts (onto dry or wet surfaces or into deep pools) are important in a wide range of applications, and, consequently, many studies, both experimental and numerical, are available in the literature. However, such works are focused either on statistical analyses of drop [...] Read more.
Drop impacts (onto dry or wet surfaces or into deep pools) are important in a wide range of applications, and, consequently, many studies, both experimental and numerical, are available in the literature. However, such works are focused either on statistical analyses of drop populations or on single drops. The literature is heavily lacking in information about the mutual interactions between a few drops during the impact. This work describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on the impact of two, three, and four synchronized drops into a deep pool. The two-phase finite-volume solver interFoam of the open source CFD package OpenFOAM® was used. After validation with respect to high speed videos, to confirm the performance of the solver in this field, impact conditions and aspects that would have been difficult to obtain and to study in experiments were investigated: namely, the energy conversion during the crater evolution, the effect of varying drop interspace and surface tension, and multiple drop impacts. The results show the very significant effect of these aspects. This implies that an extension of the results of single-drop, distilled-water laboratory experiments to real applications may not be reliable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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17 pages, 24893 KiB  
Article
Numerical Modelling of Air Pollutant Dispersion in Complex Urban Areas: Investigation of City Parts from Downtowns Hanover and Frankfurt
by Mohamed Salah Idrissi, Nabil Ben Salah and Mouldi Chrigui
Fluids 2019, 4(3), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4030137 - 18 Jul 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3142
Abstract
Hazardous gas dispersion within a complex urban environment in 1:1 scaled geometry of German cities, Hanover and Frankfurt, is predicted using an advanced turbulence model. The investigation involves a large group of real buildings with a high level of details. For this purpose, [...] Read more.
Hazardous gas dispersion within a complex urban environment in 1:1 scaled geometry of German cities, Hanover and Frankfurt, is predicted using an advanced turbulence model. The investigation involves a large group of real buildings with a high level of details. For this purpose, Computer Aided Design (CAD) of two configurations are cleaned, then fine grids meshed in. Weather conditions are introduced using power law velocity profiles at inlets boundary. The investigation focused on the effects of release locations and material properties of the contaminants (e.g., densities) on the convection/diffusion of pollutants within complex urban area. Two geometries demonstrating different topologies and boundaries conditions are investigated. Pollutants are introduced into the computational domain through chimney and/or pipe leakages in various locations. Simulations are carried out using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence model and species transport for the pollutants. The weather conditions are accounted for using a logarithmic velocity profile at inlets. CH4 and CO2 distributions, as well as turbulence quantities and velocity profiles, show important influences on the dispersion behavior of the hazardous gas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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20 pages, 17767 KiB  
Article
Cross-Correlation of POD Spatial Modes for the Separation of Stochastic Turbulence and Coherent Structures
by Daniel Butcher and Adrian Spencer
Fluids 2019, 4(3), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4030134 - 16 Jul 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 5222
Abstract
This article describes a proper-orthogonal-decomposition (POD) based methodology proposed for the identification and separation of coherent and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Typically, POD filtering requires assumptions to be made on the cumulative energy content of coherent modes and can therefore exclude smaller, but important [...] Read more.
This article describes a proper-orthogonal-decomposition (POD) based methodology proposed for the identification and separation of coherent and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Typically, POD filtering requires assumptions to be made on the cumulative energy content of coherent modes and can therefore exclude smaller, but important contributions from lower energy modes. This work introduces a suggested new metric to consider in the selection of POD modes to be included in a reconstruction of coherent and turbulent features. Cross-correlation of POD spatial modes derived from independent samples is used to identify modes descriptive of either coherent (high-correlation) or incoherent (low-correlation) features. The technique is demonstrated through application to a cylinder in cross-flow allowing appropriate analysis to be carried out on the coherent and turbulent velocity fields separately. This approach allows identification of coherent motions associated with cross-flow transport and vortex shedding, such as integral length scales. Turbulent flow characteristics may be analysed independently from the coherent motions, allowing for the extraction of properties such as turbulent length scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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19 pages, 1246 KiB  
Article
Shock Capturing in Large Eddy Simulations by Adaptive Filtering
by Sumit Kumar Patel and Joseph Mathew
Fluids 2019, 4(3), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4030132 - 15 Jul 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3005
Abstract
A method for shock capturing by adaptive filtering for use with high-resolution, high-order schemes for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) is presented. The LES method used in all the examples here employs the Explicit Filtering approach and the spatial derivatives are obtained with sixth-order, [...] Read more.
A method for shock capturing by adaptive filtering for use with high-resolution, high-order schemes for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) is presented. The LES method used in all the examples here employs the Explicit Filtering approach and the spatial derivatives are obtained with sixth-order, compact, finite differences. The adaptation is to drop the order of the explicit filter to two at gridpoints where a shock is detected, and to then increase the order from 2 to 10 in steps at successive gridpoints away from the shock. The method is found to be effective in a series of tests of common inviscid 1D and 2D problems of shock propagation and propagation of waves through shocks. As a prelude to LES, the 3D Taylor–Green problem for the inviscid and a finite viscosity case were simulated. An assessment of the overall performance of the method for LES was carried out by simulating an underexpanded round jet at a Reynolds number of 6.09 million, based in centerline velocity and diameter at nozzle exit plane. Very close quantitative agreement was found for the development of centerline mean pressure when compared to experiment. Simulations on several increasingly finer grids showed a monotonic extension of the computed part of the inertial range, with little change to low frequency content. Amplitudes and locations of large changes in pressure through several cells were captured accurately. A similar performance was observed for LES of an impinging jet containing normal and curved shocks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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13 pages, 1239 KiB  
Article
Reynolds Stress Perturbation for Epistemic Uncertainty Quantification of RANS Models Implemented in OpenFOAM
by Luis F. Cremades Rey, Denis F. Hinz and Mahdi Abkar
Fluids 2019, 4(2), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4020113 - 22 Jun 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6177
Abstract
Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are widely used for the simulation of engineering problems. The turbulent-viscosity hypothesis is a central assumption to achieve closures in this class of models. This assumption introduces structural or so-called epistemic uncertainty. Estimating that epistemic uncertainty is a promising [...] Read more.
Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are widely used for the simulation of engineering problems. The turbulent-viscosity hypothesis is a central assumption to achieve closures in this class of models. This assumption introduces structural or so-called epistemic uncertainty. Estimating that epistemic uncertainty is a promising approach towards improving the reliability of RANS simulations. In this study, we adopt a methodology to estimate the epistemic uncertainty by perturbing the Reynolds stress tensor. We focus on the perturbation of the turbulent kinetic energy and the eigenvalues separately. We first implement this methodology in the open source package OpenFOAM. Then, we apply this framework to the backward-facing step benchmark case and compare the results with the unperturbed RANS model, available direct numerical simulation data and available experimental data. It is shown that the perturbation of both parameters successfully estimate the region bounding the most accurate results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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18 pages, 5014 KiB  
Article
Effect of Overburden Height on Hydraulic Fracturing of Concrete-Lined Pressure Tunnels Excavated in Intact Rock: A Numerical Study
by Moses Karakouzian, Mohammad Nazari-Sharabian and Mehrdad Karami
Fluids 2019, 4(2), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4020112 - 19 Jun 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4127
Abstract
This study investigated the impact of overburden height on the hydraulic fracturing of a concrete-lined pressure tunnel, excavated in intact rock, under steady-state and transient-state conditions. Moreover, the Norwegian design criterion that only suggests increasing the overburden height as a countermeasure against hydraulic [...] Read more.
This study investigated the impact of overburden height on the hydraulic fracturing of a concrete-lined pressure tunnel, excavated in intact rock, under steady-state and transient-state conditions. Moreover, the Norwegian design criterion that only suggests increasing the overburden height as a countermeasure against hydraulic fracturing was evaluated. The Mohr–Coulomb failure criterion was implemented to investigate failure in the rock elements adjacent to the lining. A pressure tunnel with an inner diameter of 3.6 m was modeled in Abaqus Finite Element Analysis (FEA), using the finite element method (FEM). It was assumed that transient pressures occur inside the tunnel due to control gate closure in a hydroelectric power plant, downstream of the tunnel, in three different closure modes: fast (14 s), normal (18 s), and slow (26 s). For steady-state conditions, the results indicated that resistance to the fracturing of the rock increased with increasing the rock friction angle, as well as the overburden height. However, the influence of the friction angle on the resistance to rock fracture was much larger than that of the overburden height. For transient-state conditions, the results showed that, in fast, normal, and slow control gate closure modes, the required overburden heights to failure were respectively 1.07, 0.8, and 0.67 times the static head of water in the tunnel under a steady-state condition. It was concluded that increasing the height of overburden should not be the absolute solution to prevent hydraulic fracturing in pressure tunnels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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15 pages, 1819 KiB  
Article
Soliton Solution of Schrödinger Equation Using Cubic B-Spline Galerkin Method
by Azhar Iqbal, Nur Nadiah Abd Hamid and Ahmad Izani Md. Ismail
Fluids 2019, 4(2), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4020108 - 12 Jun 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3302
Abstract
The non-linear Schrödinger (NLS) equation has often been used as a model equation in the study of quantum states of physical systems. Numerical solution of NLS equation is obtained using cubic B-spline Galerkin method. We have applied the Crank–Nicolson scheme for time discretization [...] Read more.
The non-linear Schrödinger (NLS) equation has often been used as a model equation in the study of quantum states of physical systems. Numerical solution of NLS equation is obtained using cubic B-spline Galerkin method. We have applied the Crank–Nicolson scheme for time discretization and the cubic B-spline basis function for space discretization. Three numerical problems, including single soliton, interaction of two solitons and birth of standing soliton, are demonstrated to evaluate to the performance and accuracy of the method. The error norms and conservation laws are determined and found to be in good agreement with the published results. The obtained results show that the approach is feasible and accurate. The proposed method has almost second order convergence. The linear stability of the method is performed using the Von Neumann method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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25 pages, 15884 KiB  
Article
On the Kutta Condition in Compressible Flow over Isolated Airfoils
by Farzad Mohebbi, Ben Evans and Mathieu Sellier
Fluids 2019, 4(2), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4020102 - 1 Jun 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 10163
Abstract
This paper presents a novel and accurate method to implement the Kutta condition in solving subsonic (subcritical) inviscid isentropic compressible flow over isolated airfoils using the stream function equation. The proposed method relies on body-fitted grid generation and solving the stream function equation [...] Read more.
This paper presents a novel and accurate method to implement the Kutta condition in solving subsonic (subcritical) inviscid isentropic compressible flow over isolated airfoils using the stream function equation. The proposed method relies on body-fitted grid generation and solving the stream function equation for compressible flows in computational domain using finite-difference method. An expression is derived for implementing the Kutta condition for the airfoils with both finite angles and cusped trailing edges. A comparison of the results obtained from the proposed numerical method and the results from experimental and other numerical methods reveals that they are in excellent agreement, which confirms the accuracy and correctness of the proposed method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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18 pages, 950 KiB  
Article
Three-Dimensional Simulation of Fluid–Structure Interaction Problems Using Monolithic Semi-Implicit Algorithm
by Cornel Marius Murea
Fluids 2019, 4(2), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids4020094 - 22 May 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2818
Abstract
A monolithic semi-implicit method is presented for three-dimensional simulation of fluid–structure interaction problems. The updated Lagrangian framework is used for the structure modeled by linear elasticity equation and, for the fluid governed by the Navier–Stokes equations, we employ the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method. [...] Read more.
A monolithic semi-implicit method is presented for three-dimensional simulation of fluid–structure interaction problems. The updated Lagrangian framework is used for the structure modeled by linear elasticity equation and, for the fluid governed by the Navier–Stokes equations, we employ the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method. We use a global mesh for the fluid–structure domain where the fluid–structure interface is an interior boundary. The continuity of velocity at the interface is automatically satisfied by using globally continuous finite element for the velocity in the fluid–structure mesh. The method is fast because we solve only a linear system at each time step. Three-dimensional numerical tests are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Numerical Advances in Fluid Mechanics)
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