Special Issue "Poultry Nutrition"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Poultry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Vincenzo Tufarelli

Department of DETO, Section of Veterinary Science and Animal Production, University of Bari Aldo Moro, s.p. Casamassima Km 3, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: animal nutrition; poultry nutrition; feed science; technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish high-quality papers concerning poultry nutrition and the interrelations between nutrition, metabolism, microbiota and the health of poultry. Therefore, I invite submissions of recent findings, as original research or reviews, on poultry nutrition including, but not limited to, the following areas: the effect of feeding on poultry meat end egg quality; nutrient requirements of poultry; the use of functional feed additives to improve gut health and immune status; microbiota; nutraceuticals; soybean meal replacers as alternative sources of protein for poultry; the effects of feeding poultry on environmental impacts; the use of feed/food by-products in poultry diet; and feed technology.

Dr. Vincenzo Tufarelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • poultry nutrition
  • broiler
  • laying hen
  • quail
  • duck
  • turkey
  • feed additives
  • by-products
  • nutraceuticals

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Dietary Supplementation of L-Carnitine and Excess Lysine-Methionine on Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics, and Immunity Markers of Broiler Chicken
Animals 2019, 9(6), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060362
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 29 May 2019 / Accepted: 12 June 2019 / Published: 16 June 2019
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Abstract
L-carnitine as well as lysine and methionine are amino acids of important nutritional and nutraceutical interest and are used in nutritional strategies as diet supplements to improve feed quality characteristics in animals and broiler chicken in particular. This study investigated the effect of [...] Read more.
L-carnitine as well as lysine and methionine are amino acids of important nutritional and nutraceutical interest and are used in nutritional strategies as diet supplements to improve feed quality characteristics in animals and broiler chicken in particular. This study investigated the effect of different levels of L-carnitine and extra levels of lysine-methionine on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and some immune system markers. Two hundred seventy male Ross 308 broilers were a fed control diet (C) and eight different diets supplemented with an excess of amino acids. In the experimental diets, identified as D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6, D7, and D8, extra L-carnitine, lysine, and methionine were added in excess with respect to the American National Research Council (NRC) recommendations: L-carnitine equal to NRC (D1); control diet supplemented with lysine at 30% in excess of NRC, methionine at 30% in excess of NRC, and L-carnitine equal to NRC (D2); control diet supplemented with lysine equal to NRC, methionine equal to NRC, and L-carnitine at 15% in excess of NRC (D3); control diet supplemented control diet supplemented with lysine at 15% in excess of NRC, methionine at 15% in excess of NRC, and L-carnitine at 15% in excess of NRC (D4); control diet supplemented lysine at 30% in excess of NRC, methionine at 30% in excess of NRC, and L-carnitine at 15% in excess of NRC (D5); control diet supplemented with lysine equal to NRC recommendations, methionine equal to NRC recommendations, and L-carnitine at 75% in excess of NRC (D6); control diet supplemented with lysine at 15% in excess of NRC, methionine at 15% in excess of NRC, and L-carnitine at 75% in excess of NRC (D7); and control diet supplemented with lysine at 30% in excess of NRC, methionine at 30% in excess of NRC, and L-carnitine at 75% in excess of NRC (D8). During the starter and growth phases, feed intake was not affected by dietary treatment (p > 0.05). By contrast, body weight and FCR were both affected (p < 0.001) during the starter period. During the finisher phase, feed consumption was affected (p < 0.05) by dietary treatment. Feed intake of broilers fed on C, D3, D6, and D7 were statistically similar (p > 0.05) (1851.90, 1862.00, 1945.10, and 1872.80 g/pen/day, respectively) and were higher (p < 0.05) than 1564.40 g/pen/day (D5). With the exception of drumsticks, neck, back thoracic vertebrae, and proventriculus weights, economical carcass segments were not affected (p > 0.05) by the dietary supplementation of amino acids. Duodenum and ileum weights and lengths decreased with amino acid supplementation (p < 0.05). IgT and IgG titers against Sheep Red Blood Cells (SRBC) for both primary and secondary responses were not affected by dietary treatments (p > 0.05). Dietary amino acids supplementation did not affect IgM titer after the secondary challenge (p > 0.05) and had a significant effect (p < 0.05) on serum antibody titers in broilers vaccinated against Newcastle disease (NCD) and Gumboro ‘s disease at the 27th and 30th days, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of In Ovo Injection of L-Arginine in Different Chicken Embryonic Development Stages on Post-Hatchability, Immune Response, and Myo-D and Myogenin Proteins
Animals 2019, 9(6), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060357
Received: 8 May 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of in ovo injection with different ratios of L-arginine (L-Arg) into Ross broiler eggs at three different embryonic developmental stages (eighth day (d), 14th day, and 18th day) on the survival, hatchability, and [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of in ovo injection with different ratios of L-arginine (L-Arg) into Ross broiler eggs at three different embryonic developmental stages (eighth day (d), 14th day, and 18th day) on the survival, hatchability, and body weight (BW) of one-day-old hatched chicks. Additionally, we have analyzed the levels of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), the protein expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), and we have also determined micronuclei (MN) and nuclear abnormality (NA). In addition, the genotoxic effect was observed in peripheral blood cells such as the presence of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in the experimental groups. The results showed that survival and hatching rates as well as body weight were increased on the 14th day of incubation compared to the eighth and 18th day of incubation at lower concentrations of L-Arg. Moreover, the levels of SGOT and SGPT were also significantly (p < 0.05) increased on the 14th day of incubation at the same concentration (100 μg/μL/egg) of injection. In addition, immunoglobulin (IgM) levels were increased on the 14th day of incubation compared to other days. The protein expressions of HSP-47, HSP-60, and HSP-70 in the liver were significantly down-regulated, whereas the expression of myogenin and myoblast determination protein (MyoD) were significantly up-regulated on the 14th day after incubation when treated with all different doses such as 100 μg, 1000 μg, and 2500 μg/μL/egg, namely 3T1, 3T2, and 3T3, respectively. However, the treatment with low doses of L-Arg down-regulated the expression levels of those proteins on the 14th day of incubation. Histopathology of the liver by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining showed that the majority of liver damage, specifically intracytoplasmic vacuoles, were observed in the 3T1, 3T2, and 3T3 groups. The minimum dose of 100 μg/mL/egg on the 14th day of incubation significantly prevented intracytoplasmic vacuole damages. These results demonstrate that in ovo administration of L-Arg at (100 μg/μL/egg) may be an effective method to increase chick BW, hatch rate, muscle growth-related proteins, and promote the immune response through increasing IgM on the 14th day of the incubation period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Dietary Modulation of Selenium Form and Level on Performance, Tissue Retention, Quality of Frozen Stored Meat and Gene Expression of Antioxidant Status in Ross Broiler Chickens
Animals 2019, 9(6), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060342
Received: 23 April 2019 / Revised: 2 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 June 2019 / Published: 11 June 2019
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Abstract
This study compares between different selenium forms (sodium selenite; SeS, selenomethionine; Met-Se or nano-Se) and levels on growth performance, Se retention, antioxidative potential of fresh and frozen meat, and genes related to oxidative stress in Ross broilers. Birds (n = 450) were randomly [...] Read more.
This study compares between different selenium forms (sodium selenite; SeS, selenomethionine; Met-Se or nano-Se) and levels on growth performance, Se retention, antioxidative potential of fresh and frozen meat, and genes related to oxidative stress in Ross broilers. Birds (n = 450) were randomly divided into nine experimental groups with five replicates in each and were fed diets supplemented with 0.3, 0.45, and 0.6 mg Se/kg as (SeS, Met-Se), or nano-Se. For overall growth performance, dietary inclusion of Met-Se or nano-Se significantly increased (p < 0.05) body weight gain and improved the feed conversion ratio of Ross broiler chicks at the level of 0.45 and 0.6 mg/kg when compared with the group fed the same level of SeS. Se sources and levels significantly affected (p < 0.05) its concentrations in breast muscle, liver, and serum. Moreover, Se retention in muscle was higher (p < 0.05) after feeding of broiler chicks on a diet supplemented with Met-Se or nano-Se compared to the SeS group, especially at 0.6 mg/kg. Additionally, higher dietary levels from Met-Se or nano-Se significantly reduced oxidative changes in breast and thigh meat in the fresh state and after a four-week storage period and increased muscular pH after 24 h of slaughter. Also, broiler’s meat in the Met-Se and nano-Se groups showed cooking loss and lower drip compared to the SeS group (p < 0.05). In the liver, the mRNA expression levels of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase were elevated by increasing dietary Se levels from Met-Se and nano-Se groups up to 0.6 mg/kg when compared with SeS. Therefore, dietary supplementation with 0.6 mg/kg Met-Se and nano-Se improved growth performance and were more efficiently retained than with SeS. Both sources of selenium (Met-Se and nano-Se) downregulated the oxidation processes of meat during the first four weeks of frozen storage, especially in thigh meat, compared with an inorganic source. Finally, dietary supplementation of Met-Se and nano-Se produced acceptable Se levels in chicken meat offered for consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Whole-Life or Fattening Period Only Broiler Feeding Strategies Achieve Similar Levels of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Enrichment Using the DHA-Rich Protist, Aurantiochytrium limacinum
Animals 2019, 9(6), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060327
Received: 20 May 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 June 2019 / Published: 6 June 2019
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Abstract
The fatty acid composition of broiler chicken tissues can be increased by adding omega-3 rich ingredients to their diets. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of tissue enrichment observed following the supplementation of broilers with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich [...] Read more.
The fatty acid composition of broiler chicken tissues can be increased by adding omega-3 rich ingredients to their diets. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of tissue enrichment observed following the supplementation of broilers with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich protist, Aurantiochytrium limacinum (AURA) for their whole life (42 days) or for the final 21-day fattening period. Day-old chicks (n = 350) were distributed among 35 pens (10 birds per pen) with each pen randomly assigned to one of five treatments: Control; 0.5% AURA from day 0–42; 1% AURA from day 0–42; 0.5% AURA from day 21–42; 1% AURA from day 21–42. Production parameters were recorded over the course of the study and the fatty acid profile of the breast, thigh, liver, kidney and skin with adhering fat was quantified at the end of the feeding period. The level of supplementation had a significant impact on the degree of omega-3 tissue enrichment, however, no differences were observed when the same dose was provided for 21 or 42 days. These results indicate that supplementation with AURA for a period of 21 days does not negatively affect broiler productivity and is the most efficient strategy to increase the nutritional value of broiler products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Intestinal Morphology in Broiler Chickens Supplemented with Propolis and Bee Pollen
Animals 2019, 9(6), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060301
Received: 22 May 2019 / Revised: 26 May 2019 / Accepted: 27 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the influence of dietary supplementation with propolis and bee pollen on the intestinal morphology and absorptive surface areas of chickens. Two hundred day-old Ross 308 chickens (100 male and 100 female) were equally allocated into [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the influence of dietary supplementation with propolis and bee pollen on the intestinal morphology and absorptive surface areas of chickens. Two hundred day-old Ross 308 chickens (100 male and 100 female) were equally allocated into five groups. Throughout the whole study, the control group of chickens was fed with a basal diet, while the experimental groups of chickens were fed with the same diet supplemented with propolis and bee pollen: P1 = 0.25 g of propolis/kg + 20 g of bee pollen/kg; P2 = 0.5 g of propolis/kg; P3 = 1.0 g of propolis/kg; P4 = 20 g of bee pollen/kg. The duodenal villi of chickens from all experimental groups were significantly higher and wider (p < 0.001), while their duodenal villi crypts were significantly deeper (p < 0.001) in comparison with these parameters in chickens from the control group. The villus height to crypt depth ratio, as well as the absorptive surface areas of broiler chickens, were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in experimental groups of chickens in comparison with the control group. These findings suggest that dietary supplementation with propolis and bee pollen has a beneficial effect on broilers chickens’ intestinal morphophysiology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Residual Feed Intake and Its Relevant Measurements in Two Varieties of Japanese Quails (Coturnixcoturnix japonica) under High Environmental Temperature
Animals 2019, 9(6), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9060299
Received: 21 April 2019 / Revised: 21 May 2019 / Accepted: 22 May 2019 / Published: 30 May 2019
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Abstract
Three hundred and ten 12-week-old laying Japanese quails (Coturnixcoturnix japonica) from gray and white varieties (155 each) were randomly selected from the initial population and kept in individual battery cages. The measurements of growth and egg production were determined to derive [...] Read more.
Three hundred and ten 12-week-old laying Japanese quails (Coturnixcoturnix japonica) from gray and white varieties (155 each) were randomly selected from the initial population and kept in individual battery cages. The measurements of growth and egg production were determined to derive residual feed intake (RFI). The relationship between RFI and egg quality, blood parameters, and carcass characteristics was also determined. The results indicated that the gray quails had significantly higher egg mass and lower broken eggs compared to the white quails. A significant increase of eggshell strength and shell percentage was found in eggs produced from gray quails compared to their white counterparts, although their shell thickness means weresimilar. The results of multiple regression analysis clearly identified a significant effect of metabolic body weight and egg mass for the computation of expected feed intake, rather than body weight gain, in both varieties of Japanese quails. A strong positive correlation between RFI and feed intake in both gray and white quail varieties was found. The same trend was also observed for feed conversion ratio (FCR). Therefore, including RFI in the selection criteria of Japanese quails in order to improve FCR under high environmental temperature is highly recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Phytase Supplementation to Diets with or without Zinc Addition on Growth Performance and Zinc Utilization of White Pekin Ducks
Animals 2019, 9(5), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9050280
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 13 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 25 May 2019
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Abstract
The effect of phytase and inorganic Zn supplementation was studied in 180 male White Pekin ducks (WPD) from 1 to 56 days of age. The birds were divided into four groups fed the same basal diet (containing 26 ppm of Zn from raw [...] Read more.
The effect of phytase and inorganic Zn supplementation was studied in 180 male White Pekin ducks (WPD) from 1 to 56 days of age. The birds were divided into four groups fed the same basal diet (containing 26 ppm of Zn from raw materials): the control group did not receive Zn supplementation; the second group was supplemented with 30 ppm of Zn oxide; and the third and fourth groups were fed the control and the 30 ppm diets, respectively, both supplemented with 500 U of E. coli phytase. Each group contained five replicates of nine ducks. The body weight and feed intake were recorded at 1, 28 and 56 days of age. At 56 days of age, five birds/group were used to measure feed digestibility and five other birds/group were slaughtered. Zn at 30 ppm increased the body weight gain (BWG, p < 0.01) and feed intake (p < 0.05) and improved the feed conversion (FCR, p < 0.05) of the growing ducks. The Zn retention and Zn level in the excreta increased (p < 0.01) due to Zn supplementation. The addition of phytase improved BWG (p < 0.01) and FCR (p < 0.05) of growing ducks. The use of phytase reduced (p < 0.01) the level of Zn in duck excreta. Phytase supplementation to the basal diet at 30 ppm seems to be adequate to meet Zn requirements for ducks without further Zn additions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of Soybean Isoflavones on Growth Performance, Immune Function, and Viral Protein 5 mRNA Expression in Broiler Chickens Challenged with Infectious Bursal Disease Virus
Animals 2019, 9(5), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9050247
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 8 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
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Abstract
A total of 200 one-day-old male broilers were assigned to five groups, and each group consisted of four replicates with 10 birds per replicate. Chicks were fed the basal diet with 0 (non-infected control), 0 (infected control), 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg soybean [...] Read more.
A total of 200 one-day-old male broilers were assigned to five groups, and each group consisted of four replicates with 10 birds per replicate. Chicks were fed the basal diet with 0 (non-infected control), 0 (infected control), 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg soybean isoflavones (SI) for 42 days. At 21 days of age, chickens were inoculated with an infectious bursal dose (causing 50% morbidity) of the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) BC 6/85 strain by the eye-drop and nasal route (except for the non-infected group). Average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) decreased (p < 0.05) in broilers infected with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) from 22 to 42 days. However, infected broilers fed 10 and 20 mg SI/kg had the maximum (p <0.05) ADG and ADFI from 1 to 42 days. Body weight (BW) increased (p < 0.05) in infected broilers fed the 10 and 20 mg SI /kg diet. The bursa weight at 7 days post-infection (dpi) was increased (p < 0.05) by the supplemental 10 mg SI/kg diet. Infected broilers showed the highest (p < 0.05) bursa lesions, with an average score of 4.0 ± 0.0, while the severity of bursa lesions was decreased (p < 0.05) at 3 dpi and 7 dpi by the supplemental 20 mg SI/kg diet. Supplemental SI at 20 mg/kg decreased (p < 0.05) the viral protein 5 (VP5) mRNA expression at 3 dpi and 7 dpi. The level of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was elevated (p < 0.05) in the infected group at 3 dpi and 7 dpi as compared with the control group, while its level was decreased (p < 0.05) by supplemental 10 mg/kg SI at 3 dpi. The level of nuclear factor κB in the bursal tissue showed the lowest value (p < 0.05) with supplemental 10 and 20 mg SI/kg diet at 7 dpi. Supplemental 10, 20, 40 mg/kg SI improved (p < 0.05) the serum total antioxidant activity (T-AOC) in infected broilers at 3 dpi. In addition, the serum level of malondialdehyde (MDA) decreased (p < 0.05) in the group fed 20 mg/kg SI at 7 dpi. In conclusion, supplemental 10~20 mg/kg SI may have a positive effect on broiler chickens infected with IBDV, probably because SI decrease the severity of bursa lesions and viral protein 5 mRNA expression, and have strong antioxidant activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Ameliorative Effect of Bacillus subtilis on Growth Performance and Intestinal Architecture in Broiler Infected with Salmonella
Animals 2019, 9(4), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9040190
Received: 6 March 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
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Abstract
A total of 600 day-old broiler chicks (Ross 308) confirmed for the absence of Salmonella were randomly allocated to five treatments each with 10 replicates: negative control (basal diet only); positive control (basal diet) + infected with Salmonella; T1, Salmonella infected + [...] Read more.
A total of 600 day-old broiler chicks (Ross 308) confirmed for the absence of Salmonella were randomly allocated to five treatments each with 10 replicates: negative control (basal diet only); positive control (basal diet) + infected with Salmonella; T1, Salmonella infected + avilamycin; T2, Salmonella infected + Bacillus subtilis (ATCC PTA-6737; 2 × 107 CFU/g) and T3, Salmonella infected + B. subtilis (DSM 172999; 1.2 × 106 CFU/g). The results revealed that feed intake (FI) and body weight (BW) were significantly (p < 0.01) lower in T1 compared to T2. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) was significantly (p < 0.01) lower in T2 and T3 compared to other treatments. Similarly, the performance efficiency factor (PEF) was also significantly (p < 0.01) higher in T2 and T3 compared to positive control. Villus height was significantly (p < 0.01) higher in T2 compared to all other treatments. However, villus width and surface area were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in T1. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with B. subtilis improved growth and intestinal health by reversing the negative effects of Salmonellosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of the Dietary Supplementation of a Formulation Containing Ascorbic Acid and a Solid Dispersion of Curcumin with Boric Acid against Salmonella Enteritidis and Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens
Animals 2019, 9(4), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9040184
Received: 3 April 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 18 April 2019 / Published: 22 April 2019
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Abstract
Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of the prophylactic or therapeutic administration of a 0.1% mixture containing ascorbic acid and a solid dispersion of curcumin with polyvinylpyrrolidone and boric acid (AA-CUR/PVP-BA) against Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in broiler chickens. [...] Read more.
Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of the prophylactic or therapeutic administration of a 0.1% mixture containing ascorbic acid and a solid dispersion of curcumin with polyvinylpyrrolidone and boric acid (AA-CUR/PVP-BA) against Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in broiler chickens. A third experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of the dietary administration of 0.1% AA-CUR/PVP-BA in a necrotic enteritis (NE) model in broiler chickens. The prophylactic administration of 0.1% AA-CUR/PVP-BA significantly decreased S. Enteritidis colonization in cecal tonsils (CT) when compared to the positive control group (PC, p < 0.05). The therapeutic administration of 0.1% AA-CUR/PVP-BA significantly reduced the concentration of S. Enteritidis by 2.05 and 2.71 log in crop and CT, respectively, when compared with the PC on day 10 post-S. Enteritidis challenge. Furthermore, the serum FITC-d concentration and total intestinal IgA levels were also significantly lower in chickens that received 0.1% AA-CUR/PVP-BA. Contrary, the PC group showed significantly higher total intestinal IgA levels compared to the negative control or AA-CUR/PVP-BA groups in the NE model. However, 0.1% AA-CUR/PVP-BA showed a better effect in reducing the concentration of S. Enteritidis when compared to the NE model. Further studies with higher concentration of AA-CUR/PVP-BA into the feed to extend these preliminary results are currently being evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
Open AccessArticle
Activity and Anti-Aflatoxigenic Effect of Indigenously Characterized Probiotic Lactobacilli against Aspergillus flavus—A Common Poultry Feed Contaminant
Animals 2019, 9(4), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9040166
Received: 14 March 2019 / Revised: 28 March 2019 / Accepted: 11 April 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
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Abstract
Aflatoxin contamination in human food and animal feed is a threat to public safety. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) can be especially damaging to poultry production and consequently economic development of Pakistan. The present study assessed the in vitro binding of AFB1 by indigenously characterized [...] Read more.
Aflatoxin contamination in human food and animal feed is a threat to public safety. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) can be especially damaging to poultry production and consequently economic development of Pakistan. The present study assessed the in vitro binding of AFB1 by indigenously characterized probiotic lactobacilli. Six isolates (Lactobacillus gallinarum PDP 10, Lactobacillus reuetri FYP 38, Lactobacillus fermentum PDP 24, Lactobacillus gallinarum PL 53, Lactobacillus paracasei PL 120, and Lactobacillus gallinarum PL 149) were tested for activity against toxigenic Aspergillus flavus W-7.1 (AFB1 producer) by well diffusion assay. Only three isolates (PL 53, PL 120, and PL 149) had activity against A. flavus W-7.1. The ameliorative effect of these probiotic isolates on AFB1 production was determined by co-culturing fungus with lactobacilli for 12 days, followed by aflatoxin quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro AFB1 binding capacities of lactobacilli were determined by their incubation with a standard amount of AFB1 in phosphate buffer saline at 37 °C for 2 h. AFB1 binding capacities of isolates ranged from 28–65%. Four isolates (PDP 10, PDP 24, PL 120, and PL 149) also ceased aflatoxin production completely, whereas PL 53 showed 55% reduction in AFB1 production as compared to control. The present study demonstrated Lactobacillus gallinarum PL 149 to be an effective candidate AFB1 binding agent against Aspergillus flavus. These findings further support the binding ability of lactic acid bacteria for dietary contaminants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Poultry Nutrition)
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