Special Issue "Contemporary Challenges of Agriculture and Rural Areas in the Context of Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Piotr Prus
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Economics and Counseling in Agribusiness, Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture and Biotechnology, UTP University of Science and Technology in Bydgoszcz, Poland
Interests: sustainable development; sustainable development of rural areas and agriculture; education for sustainable development; rural advisory services; agricultural knowledge and innovation systems (AKIS); diffusion and adoption of innovations in rural areas; multifunctional development of rural areas; entrepreneurship; non-agricultural entrepreneurship in rural areas; horizontal and vertical integration in the food sector and agriculture; formation and operation of agricultural producer groups
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The image of world agriculture and rural areas is constantly changing. These changes are influenced, among others, by social expectations and policies of individual governments, which in many cases declare support for sustainable development of agriculture and rural areas. Regardless of the global downward trend of the share of agriculture in the creation of gross domestic product and employment, its role does not weaken, while its functions are changing. In addition to production functions, more and more attention is paid to the importance of agriculture in preserving environmental values, which is part of the concept of sustainable development.

Sustainable agriculture combines economic goals with environmental requirements through the management of production processes and the efficient use of natural resources in such a way as to meet the needs of farm owners and their families, consumers of food and other agricultural products, while maintaining the high quality of the natural environment and protecting its resources. Agricultural production in accordance with the principles of sustainable development requires farm owners to meet several criteria. It is connected with the need to maintain, as per the general theory of sustainable development, the right proportions between all aspects of life and with the need for harmonious balancing of economic development with social and ecological, which is not always an easy and simple task to fulfill. On the one hand, agricultural activity aims to meet the needs of farm owners and their families, must also accumulate the funds to restore production, and allow for further economic development. On the other hand, however, due to the close connection of a farm with the surrounding natural environment, the production taking place in it must be carried out in such a way that the environmental requirements are respected. Often, agricultural producers face the dilemma of choosing to achieve their economic goals at the expense of environmental requirements. The future of rural areas depends, to a large extent, on their decisions. The basis for making optimal decisions in the process of managing a farm should be current theoretical and application knowledge—including methods, technics, and tools used in the sustainable management of a farm.

However, it is important to remember that rural areas are more than just agriculture. Increasingly, they are also a place of residence for the non-agricultural population. In many countries, it can be seen that rural areas are increasingly taking on many non-agricultural functions. Various types of manufacturing and processing plants are located there, they are a place of residence, as well as rest and recreation, etc. The harmonious development of rural areas is a huge challenge facing the world today. Therefore, the purpose of this Special Issue of Agriculture is to provoke a scientific discussion on the contemporary challenges facing agriculture and rural areas today and in the near future. The collected articles will constitute a compendium of knowledge and will propose practical solutions to the burning problems that are currently facing both agriculture and rural areas in general.

Prof. Dr. Piotr Prus
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable agricultural production
  • Sustainable cultivation techniques and technologies
  • Sustainable breeding and livestock welfare
  • Challenges of agriculture in the face of climate change
  • Impact of subsidies on the development of agriculture and rural areas
  • The role of agricultural advisory services in the development of agriculture and rural areas
  • Multifunctional development of rural areas
  • Non-agricultural functions of rural areas
  • Social development of rural areas
  • Reduction of poverty and social exclusion in rural areas
  • Agricultural markets
  • Agricultural policy
  • Agri-food trade and international agri-food markets
  • Consumer behavior changes affecting the directions of agricultural production
  • Sustainable agricultural logistics
  • Farmland price
  • Food security and food safety
  • Employment and unemployment issues in rural areas

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Sugar Prices vs. Financial Market Uncertainty in the Time of Crisis: Does COVID-19 Induce Structural Changes in the Relationship?
Agriculture 2021, 11(2), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11020093 - 21 Jan 2021
Abstract
Securitization of the agricultural commodity market has accelerated since the beginning of the 21st century, particularly in the times of financial market uncertainty and crisis. Sugar belongs to the group of important agricultural commodities. The global financial crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic has [...] Read more.
Securitization of the agricultural commodity market has accelerated since the beginning of the 21st century, particularly in the times of financial market uncertainty and crisis. Sugar belongs to the group of important agricultural commodities. The global financial crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic has caused a substantial increase in the stock market volatility. Moreover, the novel coronavirus hit both the sugar market’s supply and demand side, resulting in sugar stock changes. The paper aims to assess potential structural changes in the relationship between sugar prices and the financial market uncertainty in a crisis time. In more detail, using sequential Bai–Perron tests for structural breaks, we check whether the global financial crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic have induced structural breaks in that relationship. Sugar prices are represented by the S&P GSCI Sugar Index, while the S&P 500 option-implied volatility index (VIX) is used to show stock market uncertainty. To investigate the changes in the relationship between sugar prices and stock market uncertainty, a regression model with a sequential Bai–Perron test for structural breaks is applied for the daily data from 2000–2020. We reveal the existence of two structural breaks in the analysed relationship. The first breakpoint was linked to the global financial crisis outbreak, and the second occurred in December 2011. Surprisingly, the COVID-19 pandemic has not induced the statistically significant structural change. Based on the regression model with Bai–Perron structural changes, we show that from 2000 until the beginning of the global financial crisis, the relationship between the sugar prices and the financial market uncertainty was insignificant. The global financial crisis led to a structural change in the relationship. Since August 2008, we observe a significant and negative relationship between the S&P GSCI Sugar Index and the S&P 500 option-implied volatility index (VIX). Sensitivity analysis conducted for the different financial market uncertainty measures, i.e., the S&P 500 Realized Volatility Index confirms our findings. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Durability of Zambia’s Agricultural Exports
Agriculture 2021, 11(1), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11010073 - 17 Jan 2021
Abstract
This paper establishes the determinants of the export durability of agriculture products in Zambia with specific attention to maize, sugar, cotton, and tobacco between 1996 and 2019. We find that approximately 39% of Zambia’s agricultural products were exported beyond the first year of [...] Read more.
This paper establishes the determinants of the export durability of agriculture products in Zambia with specific attention to maize, sugar, cotton, and tobacco between 1996 and 2019. We find that approximately 39% of Zambia’s agricultural products were exported beyond the first year of trading and less than 10% lasted up to 6 years of trading. The mean and median duration of exporting agricultural products in Zambia was 1.7 years and 1 year, respectively. Among the products, maize had the highest export duration after the first year of trading, followed by sugar, tobacco, and cotton. Results of the discrete-time logit and probit models with random effects revealed that the duration of total agricultural products was significantly impacted by common colony, contiguity, partner’s gross domestic product (GDP), Zambia’s GDP, initial exports, and total exports. Of these factors, colonial history and Zambia’s GDP reduced export duration, while contiguity, partner’s GDP, initial exports, and total exports increased the durability of exports in Zambia. The effect of Zambia’s GDP was uniform across all individual agricultural products. Total exports also significantly impacted all other agriculture products in a similar manner except for maize. Export durability for cotton was significantly impacted by the Regional Trade Agreements (RTAs), while the export durability of tobacco was significantly impacted by distance, contiguity, and partner’s GDP. To increase the duration of agriculture exports, we propose the exporting of finished agriculture products (and not just raw materials), which have a higher market value and duration probability. Farmers also need support with export subsidies, increased foreign market access (especially to economies with higher buying power), and negotiated favorable trade terms in the region and around the globe. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
How to Prevent Bread Losses in the Baking and Confectionery Industry?—Measurement, Causes, Management and Prevention
Agriculture 2021, 11(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11010019 - 30 Dec 2020
Abstract
Food losses and waste are associated with inefficient use of agricultural land, water and other resources and agricultural raw materials. Reducing the scale of food wastage is one of the most urgent challenges for food system operators, starting from agriculture to food consumption [...] Read more.
Food losses and waste are associated with inefficient use of agricultural land, water and other resources and agricultural raw materials. Reducing the scale of food wastage is one of the most urgent challenges for food system operators, starting from agriculture to food consumption in the households. This is all the more urgent as food insecurity has deepened during the COVID-19 pandemic. There are few studies on how to reduce food losses in food processing sectors, as most researchers focus on the demand side of the market, especially within household consumption. To fill the knowledge gaps related to the inefficient production system in the baking and confectionery industry (BCI), research was conducted to estimate the scale of losses in BCI in Poland, determine their causes and assess the risk of their occurrence, identify retrieve points (RP) and ways of reducing and preventing losses. Two research methods were used. Quantitative data were collected using an Internet survey method on a sample of 48 bakeries. The qualitative data was provided by 5 individual in-depth interviews with experts from the surveyed industry. The results showed that the total scale of losses in Polish BCI reached 2.39% (in 2017) and 2.63% (in 2018) of the weight of manufactured products. The loss analysis was presented within respective sections of production: raw materials magazine (RMM), production section (PS), final product magazine (FPM), final product transport (FPT). The highest loss level was reported for PS—1.56% (2017), 1.85% (2018). Additionally, 12 loss risks and nine main cause categories were identified. Potential 6 retrieve points (RP) during the baking processes were indicated: making and handling intermediate products and dough; portioning and forming of dough, baking, customised packing, shipping (storage), transport by own fleet. The type of risk, the cause of losses, their consequences, and manners of preventing losses were specified for each RP. Being the first study of this kind in Poland, its results are key to build a road map for further researches focused on reduction of food losses, more sustainable management of resources in BCI. It might contribute to corporate social responsibility and value co-creation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Value of Agroecosystem Services in Warmia and Mazury Province Using Choice Experiments
Agriculture 2021, 11(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11010004 - 23 Dec 2020
Abstract
Due to the often-intangible benefits of agroecosystem services (AES), their cultural, social, and economic value is very difficult to quantify and integrate into decision-making and policy-making processes. The aim of this study is to assess the non-market values of AES in an exceptionally [...] Read more.
Due to the often-intangible benefits of agroecosystem services (AES), their cultural, social, and economic value is very difficult to quantify and integrate into decision-making and policy-making processes. The aim of this study is to assess the non-market values of AES in an exceptionally environmentally rich area of the Warmia and Mazury region (Poland), identifying consumers’ preferences for them using the choice experiment (CE) method. Four AES attributes were selected for the research: (i) water quality; (ii) wildlife populations; and (iii) agricultural landscape. The study has revealed that the residents of Warmia and Mazury region were concerned about environmental issues that may be caused by agriculture. There was a demand for the provision of AES. The application of multinomial logit (MNL) model has revealed that marginal willingness to pay (MWTP) values were the highest for water quality (EUR 1.94), followed by wildlife population (EUR 1.02) and agricultural landscape (EUR 0.85). The findings have provided quantitative information related to the demand for improvements in AES through agri-environmental protection programs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Tourism Competitiveness of Rural Areas: Evidence from a Region in Poland
Agriculture 2020, 10(11), 569; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10110569 - 22 Nov 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of the article is to present the analysis of tourism competitiveness of the rural areas of the Eastern Poland microregion (Podlaskie, Warmińsko–mazurskie, Lubelskie, Świętokrzyskie, Podkarpackie provinces). To group the rural communes in terms of tourism competitiveness, a cluster analysis with Ward’s [...] Read more.
The aim of the article is to present the analysis of tourism competitiveness of the rural areas of the Eastern Poland microregion (Podlaskie, Warmińsko–mazurskie, Lubelskie, Świętokrzyskie, Podkarpackie provinces). To group the rural communes in terms of tourism competitiveness, a cluster analysis with Ward’s method was applied. To do so, the data provided by the Central Statistical Office (Warsaw) in Poland of 2019 were used. The analyses provided in the article confirm the dependence between the size of the areas of outstanding natural beauty and the region’s tourism competitiveness. The results can be applied by the representatives of various institutions and organizations supporting the development of tourism in those areas. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Barriers to the Development of Organic Farming: A Polish Case Study
Agriculture 2020, 10(11), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10110536 - 07 Nov 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The main purpose of this paper is to explore farmers’ opinions on the barriers to the development of organic farming. A survey was carried out with 262 Polish organic farmers in order to classify the barriers to organic farming development into production, and [...] Read more.
The main purpose of this paper is to explore farmers’ opinions on the barriers to the development of organic farming. A survey was carried out with 262 Polish organic farmers in order to classify the barriers to organic farming development into production, and economic aspects, market aspects and institutional and regulatory aspects. As a next step, a detailed analysis was performed of how the farmers view these barriers. According to this study, Polish organic farmers attach greater importance to economic factors than to non-economic ones. Low yields and production volumes are the reason why many farmers see organic farming as being risky. More than 80% and nearly 60% of farmers covered by this study found the production risk to be very high or high, respectively, during and after the conversion period. Most farmers say they intend to continue their organic production activity only if financial support is provided. Nearly one in five farms (18.3%) want to discontinue organic production in future. This is especially true for two types of farming: specialized grazing livestock farms and mixed holdings. The farmers believe that market aspects and institutional and regulatory factors are the key barriers to the development of organic farming. The findings regarding the role of institutional barriers and communications from regulatory institutions, which affect the farmers’ decision-making processes, are of particular importance. In Poland, the main institutional problem is the instability of laws applicable to organic farming, which adds to the farmers’ uncertainty and decision-making risks. The case study of Poland, which is among the emerging markets for organic food, shows that a stable and coherent support policy is a condition for organic-farming development. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Savings of Small Farms: Their Magnitude, Determinants and Role in Sustainable Development. Example of Poland
Agriculture 2020, 10(11), 525; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10110525 - 04 Nov 2020
Abstract
Savings are a catalyst for capital creation and are the driving force behind economic growth and development. The degree of development achieved by farms will largely depend on their ability to accumulate income and their way of spending. The aim of the article [...] Read more.
Savings are a catalyst for capital creation and are the driving force behind economic growth and development. The degree of development achieved by farms will largely depend on their ability to accumulate income and their way of spending. The aim of the article is to determine the savings-generating potential of small farms in Poland and the impact of savings on their sustainable development. In this article, firstly, the literature on savings in small farms and their role in sustainable development is synthesized. Secondly, presents empirical research that was conducted considering the economic and social characteristics of 1485 small farms to help understand saving behaviors in the chosen context. The research material consisted of data on entities participating in the Polish Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) in 2017. The factors influencing the generation of savings were identified using the logit regression model. The results of the research indicate great diversity in the scale of savings generated by small farms in Poland. Moreover, the study showed that 4 out of 21 variables characterizing small farms were significant, with a good fit of the model as evidenced by the model quality assessment measures used (coefficient R2count and ROC curve). It was found that two variables, namely area of farmland and gross value added, each had a statistically significant positive influence on the probability of generating higher savings by small farms in Poland. On the other hand, the possession of liabilities and gross investment each had a statistically significant negative influence on the accumulation of higher savings. The research reveals some limitations that may hinder the mobilization of savings by small farms and thus affect their sustainable development. Therefore, as recommendations, we present measures that can increase savings by small farms in Poland. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Identification of the Conditions for Organic Agriculture Development in Polish Districts—An Implementation of Canonical Analysis
Agriculture 2020, 10(11), 514; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10110514 - 30 Oct 2020
Abstract
Organic farming in Poland has been developing dynamically since the accession to the EU. However, there are considerable differences in the level of organic farming development in particular regions. Therefore, it is vital to identify the primary factors and conditions for this development [...] Read more.
Organic farming in Poland has been developing dynamically since the accession to the EU. However, there are considerable differences in the level of organic farming development in particular regions. Therefore, it is vital to identify the primary factors and conditions for this development and their importance considering their spatial distribution. The presented paper aims to estimate the relationships between the level of organic agriculture development and selected conditions of financial and environmental character. The investigation is based on primary data for 2017 retrieved from the Local Data Bank of the Main Statistical Office and Agricultural and Food Quality Inspection database for all Poland districts. In order to achieve this objective, a multivariate statistical analysis method—the canonical correlation was applied. The analysis was preceded by constructing the composite indices of organic agriculture development and its conditions based on a Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) method and correlation analysis between the indices developed by the authors. The performed canonical analysis showed two statistically significant canonical variables with relatively high values of the canonical correlation (0.74 and 0.59). It proves that the degree of explaining the variability of one set of variables through linear relationships (referring to the level of organic farming development), by the second input data set (describing the determinants of the development), by successive pairs of canonical variables is high. This means that the created model describes relatively well the considered data sets. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Scarecrow as Part of Polish Rural Cultural Landscapes
Agriculture 2020, 10(11), 496; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10110496 - 24 Oct 2020
Abstract
Diverse historical, cultural landscapes can be found in many parts of the world, and also in rural areas. They are a challenge for interdisciplinary research. One of the gradually disappearing components of rural cultural landscapes in Poland is the scarecrow. The objective of [...] Read more.
Diverse historical, cultural landscapes can be found in many parts of the world, and also in rural areas. They are a challenge for interdisciplinary research. One of the gradually disappearing components of rural cultural landscapes in Poland is the scarecrow. The objective of this paper was to analyse the role of the scarecrow in the Polish rural cultural landscape today. The field research was aimed at determining whether the scarecrow can be seen in Polish rural areas, and if yes, what the circumstances and its forms are. A site visit yielded copious photographic records of rural areas. The investigated area was selected following a literature analysis and analysis of environmental and economic conditions on the regional level in Poland. The visit demonstrated that although scarecrows are part of the cultural landscape of the Polish countryside, they are slightly more modest in their appearance than in the past. Scarecrows are placed in small, family-owned agricultural holdings that have time to uphold local traditions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Water Needs of Grapevines in Western Poland from the Perspective of Climate Change
Agriculture 2020, 10(10), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10100477 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Climate changes lead to a rise in air temperature, which significantly increases the water needs of plants. Maintaining crop productivity will increasingly require the use of plant irrigation. The aim of this study was to assess the water needs of grapevines cultivated in [...] Read more.
Climate changes lead to a rise in air temperature, which significantly increases the water needs of plants. Maintaining crop productivity will increasingly require the use of plant irrigation. The aim of this study was to assess the water needs of grapevines cultivated in the western provinces of Poland. The calculations were made on the basis of temperature and precipitation measurements collected at three meteorological stations in the period 1981–2010. Water needs were calculated as crop evapotranspiration, which was estimated by crop coefficients and reference evapotranspiration, determined using the Blaney–Criddle formula. The rainfall deficit was assessed by Ostromęcki’s method. The tendency to increase the water needs was observed in each subsequent decade of the thirty-year period, both in the whole growing season (May–October), as well as in June–August and July. The highest values of the linear correlation coefficient for the trend of time variability in water needs occurred from June to August. An analysis of water needs and rainfall deficits indicates the need for the additional irrigation of vineyards in western Poland, especially in very dry years and in June–August. Current research results are helpful in designing vineyard irrigation systems and allow an economical and efficient planning of grapevine irrigation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Objectives of Farm Operations—Evidence from a Region in Poland
Agriculture 2020, 10(10), 458; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10100458 - 07 Oct 2020
Abstract
The objectives set by agricultural producers directly translate into the directions of the development of farms. What is particularly important: Is there a conflict between the economic and environmental objectives of farm operations? This issue is not resolved in the literature on the [...] Read more.
The objectives set by agricultural producers directly translate into the directions of the development of farms. What is particularly important: Is there a conflict between the economic and environmental objectives of farm operations? This issue is not resolved in the literature on the subject and still is a challenge for policymakers. The main aim of the article is to identify the preferences of farm managers concerning the objectives of farm operations, as well as to examine their mutual relations. The article employs the results of surveys carried out on farms from the Wielkopolska region (Poland). The analysis of Spearman’s rank, cluster analysis, also the classification tree method, and multidimensional scaling were applied. The research shows that the relations between the income and assets objective turned out to be moderate in terms of strength, while the environmental objective turned out to be statistically insignificant related to economic objectives (in the context of their perception by respondents). There are differences in this respect, including also a group of the respondents in which income and environmental objectives have been ranked simultaneously high. It is, however, difficult to state clearly whether there is a complementarity between the income and the environmental objective from the perspective of perception by respondents. Although when the context of the real action is taken into account then the answer should be positive. Therefore, there is a gap between the farmers’ perception of reality—choice of the hierarchy of objectives, and the real activities, e.g., in terms of pro-environmental activities. It is a new issue that points to the need to stimulate the environmental objective, in particular, through support at the level of agricultural policy instruments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Environmental Impacts and Attitudes of Agricultural Enterprises for Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development
Agriculture 2020, 10(10), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10100440 - 28 Sep 2020
Abstract
Recognising that implementing an agricultural enterprise impacts the state of the environment, its ecological stability, and the self- regulatory capabilities of ecosystems, the aim of this paper is to acquaint the professional and lay public about the attitudes of Slovakian agricultural enterprises towards [...] Read more.
Recognising that implementing an agricultural enterprise impacts the state of the environment, its ecological stability, and the self- regulatory capabilities of ecosystems, the aim of this paper is to acquaint the professional and lay public about the attitudes of Slovakian agricultural enterprises towards environmental protection and sustainable development. The paper draws attention to present methods, techniques, and tools that enterprise management are applying for the purpose of meeting and overcoming environmental challenges. The data for this research were obtained from controlled interviews and a questionnaire survey conducted across more than 90 agricultural enterprises. Based on the data outcomes, research premises and formulated research hypotheses put forward are verified by using Friedman, Wilcoxon, Kruskal–Wallis, and Pearson chi-square tests. Discussion of the findings points out that although Slovakia is not yet one of the most polluting countries, promoting the application of environmental protection approaches for sustainable development is of the essence. The most important agriculturally related step, mitigating environmental degradation, is to promote changes in the moral values of agricultural enterprises and the society through enhanced environmental awareness and application practices. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Climate Change in the Banat Plain, Western Romania, on the Accessibility of Water for Crop Production in Agriculture
Agriculture 2020, 10(10), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10100437 - 27 Sep 2020
Abstract
Global warming is an unanimously accepted phenomenon by the international scientific community, being already highlighted by the analysis of observational data over long periods of time, with an increase in temperature of over 1 °C. Climate change in Romania is part of the [...] Read more.
Global warming is an unanimously accepted phenomenon by the international scientific community, being already highlighted by the analysis of observational data over long periods of time, with an increase in temperature of over 1 °C. Climate change in Romania is part of the global context, taking into account the regional conditions, with an increasing trend of arid summer. While the link between high temperatures, climate change and rainfall has been modeled in detail, the situation is not the same for plant water accessibility. The period of time between 1898 and the present, corresponding to the annual records of precipitation and evapotranspiration, overlapped with important political and administrative changes in the studied area, and with extensive hydro-amelioration works. The aim of the paper is to statistically follow the evolution over time of precipitation, namely of evapotranspiration measured in Western Romania, which would allow the expression of conclusions regarding the improvement directions of the water regime. In order to follow the evolution in time of these data, the interval of 1898–2019 was divided into three periods: 1898–1950, 1951–1989 and 1990–2019, respectively. The increase in temperature, especially during the vegetation period and the large number of years in which evapotranspiration quantitatively exceeds the precipitation, indicating the need for effective measures to regulate the water balance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Consumers’ Purchasing Intentions on the Legume Market as Evidence of Sustainable Behaviour
Agriculture 2020, 10(10), 424; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10100424 - 23 Sep 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to verify the knowledge that is useful for legume producers in relation to consumers’ eating habits in the field of legume products. According to experts, leguminous products have a positive effect on human health. The tendency towards [...] Read more.
The purpose of this paper is to verify the knowledge that is useful for legume producers in relation to consumers’ eating habits in the field of legume products. According to experts, leguminous products have a positive effect on human health. The tendency towards healthy eating habits is also associated with the idea of sustainable consumption. The authors have attempted to combine these two trends. The main goal was to determine, among consumers, the level of knowledge about legumes, product purchase motives, and preferred places of purchase. This study was carried out with the use of an authorial questionnaire. In total, 1067 respondents from all regions of Poland participated in the study. The Statistica 13.1PL programme was used for statistical analyses. Methods used: descriptive statistics, discriminant analysis and linear regression analysis. With the aid of the conducted analyses, it was possible to determine that peas, beans, soybeans and lentils are the most recognised and most frequently consumed products (in various configurations) among the residents of the studied groups. The most important motives for their purchase among the surveyed consumers were “flavour”, “price” and the fact that these products can be an alternative to meat products and contain a lot of protein and fibre. The purchase channels that legume product producers must pay attention to are large-area shops and online sales. Sustainable consumption awareness for the consumers of legume products is best defined by a variable in the regression equation—“no harmful substances used during its production”. The legume products market has not yet flourished in Poland. The products are an excellent alternative to meat products due to their high protein content. Pro-health education has a measurable effect and consumer awareness is growing. Producers should use this knowledge by emphasising, in the promotion of products, that the products are produced in accordance with the idea of sustainable development, without the use of harmful substances, and that no means are used to extend the shelf life. Full article
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