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Cosmetics, Volume 5, Issue 4 (December 2018)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Formulating O/W Emulsions with Plant-Based Actives: A Stability Challenge for an Effective Product
Received: 6 September 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 2 October 2018 / Published: 9 October 2018
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Abstract
Quality, safety, and efficacy concerns added to instability, poor absorption, and the dispersion of actives are common problems while formulating plant-based cosmetics. Furthermore, a correct balance between the stability of the emulsion, the sensory profile, and the high efficacy has to be considered
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Quality, safety, and efficacy concerns added to instability, poor absorption, and the dispersion of actives are common problems while formulating plant-based cosmetics. Furthermore, a correct balance between the stability of the emulsion, the sensory profile, and the high efficacy has to be considered to formulate an effective product. In this paper, we demonstrate that rheology is a methodological tool that can be used while designing a new product. In particular, we developed an O/W emulsion which is easy to spread on irritated skin, and that can soothe the redness and discomfort caused by the exposure to both physical and chemical irritating agents. The green active mixture consists of three natural raw materials: Bosexil®, Zanthalene®, and Xilogel®. Each ingredient has a well-demonstrated efficacy in terms of soothing, anti-itching, and moisturizing properties respectively. Starting from the selection of a new green emulsifying system, through the analysis of the rheological properties, we obtained a stable and easy-to-apply o/w emulsion. The efficacy of the optimized product was assessed in vitro on intact and injured skin using the SkinEthic™ Reconstituted Human Epidermis (RHE) as a biological model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
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Open AccessReview Agro-Industrial By-Products and Their Bioactive Compounds—An Ally against Oxidative Stress and Skin Aging
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 29 September 2018 / Published: 1 October 2018
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Abstract
The increased consumer awareness towards hazards related with sun exposure has given a boost in the cosmetics industry and particularly the sun care market. Human skin is continually being threatened by the UV irradiation present in sunlight and acute UV exposure leads to
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The increased consumer awareness towards hazards related with sun exposure has given a boost in the cosmetics industry and particularly the sun care market. Human skin is continually being threatened by the UV irradiation present in sunlight and acute UV exposure leads to skin photoaging. Cosmetic and/or dermatological applications include several bioactive compounds that contribute to the regulation of epidermal homeostasis by providing protection against solar radiation and improving the antioxidant activity of epidermis. Plant extracts are sources of active ingredients with intense therapeutic properties, and the topical application or oral intake of these compounds could ameliorate skin condition. Nowadays, there is a growing demand for the application of the bioactive agents contained in agro-industrial byproducts in sun care products, since many of them have shown promising properties as skin photoprotectants. However, well-conducted clinical studies are required to prove their safety and efficacy before they could be regularly used. Environmentally friendly extraction and sustainable techniques are therefore under examination for recovering such compounds from agro-industrial byproducts and converting them into innovative high-value natural ingredients used in cosmetic formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
Open AccessArticle Hidden Metals in Several Brands of Lipstick and Face Powder Present on Polish Market
Received: 25 August 2018 / Revised: 16 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 1 October 2018
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Abstract
Cosmetics still retain their brilliant effect, but public concern about their toxicity has become a hot issue. Trace amounts of toxic heavy metals can be either intentionally added to cosmetics or present as impurities in the raw materials. We therefore assessed the levels
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Cosmetics still retain their brilliant effect, but public concern about their toxicity has become a hot issue. Trace amounts of toxic heavy metals can be either intentionally added to cosmetics or present as impurities in the raw materials. We therefore assessed the levels of lead, nickel, copper, zinc and iron in six brands of lipstick and six brands of cosmetic powder that are widely available in local Polish markets. The cosmetics were digested and analyzed for the metals using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Lead and nickel were found in some powders, but none in lipstick samples. This study revealed that the levels of these metals were higher than the specifications reported in the literature data. On the other hand, the copper content was determined at the level of 435 mg/kg in one sample of powder and at 75.92 mg/kg in one lipstick. Iron levels ranged from 0 to 12,168.57 mg/kg depending on the brand of powder or lipstick, and were generally higher in powders. Zinc was detected in the range of 1.73–488.31 mg/kg in all 12 samples. The results lead to the conclusion that constant control of metallic content in lipsticks, powders and other facial cosmetics should be seriously considered. Full article
Open AccessArticle Hair Strengthening Evaluation of Anisotropic Osmolite Solutions (Inositol + Arginine): Cross-Talk between Dermal Papilla Fibroblast and Keratinocytes of the Outer Root Sheath Using a µHair Follicle 3D Model
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 9 August 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
The hair follicle (HF) is a dynamic “mini-organ” which undergoes bi-continuous cycles of growth, destruction and rest. The molecular mechanisms underlying the HF cycle are complex yet not fully understood. Anyhow, it is clear that the epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, and in particular the cross-talk
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The hair follicle (HF) is a dynamic “mini-organ” which undergoes bi-continuous cycles of growth, destruction and rest. The molecular mechanisms underlying the HF cycle are complex yet not fully understood. Anyhow, it is clear that the epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, and in particular the cross-talk between dermal papilla fibroblast (DPF) and the keratinocytes of the outer root sheath (ORSK) play a pivotal role. Aim of this study is the evaluation of the biological activity of anisotropic osmolyte solutions on the HF cycle. As reported in recent studies, dermal papilla cells deeply modify their gene expression profile when cultured as monolayers, but their transcriptional pattern can be partially restored when they are cultured as 3-dimensional spheroids. This draws our attention to the discovery that the spatial distribution of cells in the growth medium is fundamental in order to produce a verisimilar model. Therefore, we used the hanging drop technology to produce a scaffold-free micro-tissue model applied to a DPF-ORSK co-culture in order to create a µHF 3-dimensional model. As a result, this system was capable of evaluating the efficacy of the anisotropic osmolyte solutions on the progressive increase of the follicle turnover and ‘health’. Moreover, an in silico model was used in order to screen the most promising combination of osmolyte molecules. In vivo objective evaluations were finally carried out on volunteers having hair disorders. Full article
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Open AccessReview Anti-Aging Properties of Plant Stem Cell Extracts
Received: 9 August 2018 / Revised: 20 September 2018 / Accepted: 21 September 2018 / Published: 22 September 2018
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Abstract
Skin aging is a complex process which involves all the layers of the epidermis and dermis. In order to slow skin aging, methods are researched which would strengthen and protect skin stem cells. Science is in search of the right method to stimulate
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Skin aging is a complex process which involves all the layers of the epidermis and dermis. In order to slow skin aging, methods are researched which would strengthen and protect skin stem cells. Science is in search of the right method to stimulate the proliferation of epidermal stem cells. Plant stem cells show outstanding anti-aging properties, as they can, among other activities, stimulate fibroblasts to synthesise collagen, which, in turn, stimulates skin regeneration. One of the most important agents which give anti-aging properties to plant stem cell extracts is kinetin (6-furfuryladenine). This compound belongs to a cytokine group and is considered to be a strong antioxidant which protects protein and nucleic acids from oxidation and glycoxidation processes. It enables cells to remove the excess of free radicals to protect them from oxidative stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-aging Properties of Natural Compounds)
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