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Cosmetics 2018, 5(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics5040068

Seaweeds as Source of Bioactive Substances and Skin Care Therapy—Cosmeceuticals, Algotheraphy, and Thalassotherapy

Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre (MARE), Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 9 November 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 22 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-aging and Anti-inflammatory Properties of Natural Compounds)
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Abstract

Riverine, estuarine, and coastal populations have always used algae in the development of home remedies that were then used to treat diverse health problems. The empirical knowledge of various generations originated these applications, and their mechanism of action is, in most cases, unknown, that is, few more scientific studies would have been described beyond simple collection and ethnographic recording. Nevertheless, recent investigations, carried out with the purpose of analyzing the components and causes that alter the functioning and the balance of our organism, are already giving their first results. Water, and especially sea water is considered as essential to life on our planet. It sings all the substances necessary and conducive to the development of the living being (minerals, catalysts, vitamins, amino acids, etc.). Oceans cover over 70% of Earth, being home to up to 90% of the organisms in the planet. Many rich resources and unique environments are provided by the ocean. Additionally, bioactive compounds that multiple marine organisms have a great potential to produce can be used as nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and cosmeceuticals. Both primary and secondary metabolites are produced by algae. The first ones are directly implicated in development, normal growth, or reproduction conditions to perform physiological functions. Stress conditions, like temperature changes, salinity, environmental pollutants, or UV radiation exposure cause the performance of secondary metabolites. In algae, proteins, polysaccharides, fatty acids, and amino acids are primary metabolites and phenolic compounds, pigments, vitamins, sterols, and other bioactive agents, all produced in algae tissues, are secondary metabolites. These algal active constituents have direct relevance in cosmetics. View Full-Text
Keywords: cosmetic products; cosmeceuticals; seawater; thalassotherapy; bath; skin; UV protection; treatment; eczemas; dermatoses; psoriasis; nasopharyngeal inflammations; conjunctivitis cosmetic products; cosmeceuticals; seawater; thalassotherapy; bath; skin; UV protection; treatment; eczemas; dermatoses; psoriasis; nasopharyngeal inflammations; conjunctivitis
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Pereira, L. Seaweeds as Source of Bioactive Substances and Skin Care Therapy—Cosmeceuticals, Algotheraphy, and Thalassotherapy. Cosmetics 2018, 5, 68.

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