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Sustainable Zero Energy Buildings

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2021) | Viewed by 8306

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
TECNALIA, Spain
Interests: sustainable buildings; life cycle sustainability assessment; energy planning

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Guest Editor
Departamento de Arquitectura, UPV Irakasle atxikia, University of the Basque Country(UPV/EHU), 48940 Leioa, Biscay, Spain
Interests: life cycle assessment; building thermal behaviour; thermal confort; user behaviour; energy simulation; simulation tools; district energetic assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Building regulation and policies around the world are quickly evolving towards a reduction on building energy use during their operation, with the term ‘zero energy buildings’ being frequently used and presented as the ultimate goal. This ambitious goal is indeed very well justified within the current state of a global climate emergency, which calls for solutions towards drastic reduction of energy-related greenhouse gases. There are, however, many additional economic, social, and environmental aspects which should also be considered when planning, designing, and constructing ‘zero energy buildings’.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to compile a set of papers dealing with these wider aspects of sustainability, in relation to ‘zero’ or ‘nearly zero’ energy buildings. Sustainability issues can be considered at the different building processes, from planning, design and contracting issues, to construction, commissioning, use, and maintenance of the buildings. Invited contributions include the following topics:

  • ‘Affordable zero energy buildings’ (AZEB), including economic perspectives from building developer, construction companies, building owners, users, etc.;
  • Life cycle assessment (LCA), life cycle costing (LCC), and social life cycle assessment (SLCA) for zero energy buildings;
  • Occupant behavior and comfort in zero energy buildings;
  • Zero energy buildings and household energy poverty;
  • Predicted vs. real performance for zero energy buildings.

References:

  • HERNANDEZ, P. HERNANDEZ, J., URRA, I., GRISALEÑA, D.& KENNY, P. (2019) Life cycle environmental and cost evaluation of heating and hot water supply in social housing nZEBs; IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental ScienceVolume 323conference 1
  • HERNANDEZ, P. & KENNY, P. (2010) From net energy to zero energy buildings: Defining life cycle zero energy buildings (LC-ZEB). Energy and Buildings, 42, 815-821.
  • OREGI, X, HERNANDEZ, P., GAZULLA, C., ISASA, M. (2015) Integrating Simplified and Full Life Cycle Approaches in Decision Making for Building Energy Refurbishment: Benefits and Barriers, Buildings 2015, 5(2), 354-380;
  • D'Agostino, Delia; Mazzarella, Livio. What is a Nearly zero energy building? Overview, implementation and comparison of definitions. Journal of Building Engineering 2019, 21:200-212
  • Lan, Lan, Wood, Kristin L, Yuen, Chau. A holistic design approach for residential net-zero energy buildings: A case study in Singapore. Sustainable Cities and Society, 2019, 50.
  • Liu, Zhijian, Zhou, Qingxu, Tian, Zhiyong, He, Bao-jie, Jin, Guangya. A comprehensive analysis on definitions, development, and policies of nearly zero energy buildings in China. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 2019, 114
  • Feng, Wei, Zhang, Qianning, Ji, Hui, Wang, Ran, Zhou, Nan, Ye, Qing, Hao, Bin, Li, Yutong, Luo, Duo, Lau, Stephen Siu Yu. A review of net zero energy buildings in hot and humid climates: Experience learned from 34 case study buildings. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 2019,114

Dr. Patxi Hernandez
Dr. Xabat Oregi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zero energy buildings
  • life cycle
  • sustainable buildings
  • LCA
  • LCC
  • occupant comfort
  • energy performance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

30 pages, 12184 KiB  
Article
Thermal Comfort in NZEB Collective Housing in Northern Spain
by Iñigo Rodríguez Vidal, Jorge Otaegi and Xabat Oregi
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9630; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229630 - 18 Nov 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4832
Abstract
European Building Codes have transitioned towards Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) requirements in new constructions, demanding high levels of insulation and airtightness derived from research and standards developed in Northern and Central Europe. The use of these principles in Southern Europe, where solar [...] Read more.
European Building Codes have transitioned towards Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) requirements in new constructions, demanding high levels of insulation and airtightness derived from research and standards developed in Northern and Central Europe. The use of these principles in Southern Europe, where solar radiation is greater and building typologies and user behaviour are different, may have had a negative impact in Thermal Comfort and Energy Demand and Consumption. In this study, six dwellings located in a 2018 27-storey Passivhaus-certified building were monitored for a period of 9–18 months in 2019 and 2020. In the spirit of a complete Post-Occupancy Evaluation, a User Comfort Survey was carried out. The obtained data were analysed and fixed-limit and adaptative comfort models were used to assess the compliance of several European Comfort Standards, namely, EN ISO 7730, EN 15251, CIBSE TM:52, CIBSE TM:59 and CIBSE Guide A. Experimental results confirmed the issues reported by occupants in the Comfort Survey, making evident a severe overheating problem which we were able to quantify. In addition to presenting the obtained data and its analysis, this paper discusses the plausible causes and health-related implications of excess heat in NZEB Housing in the Northern Spanish climate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Zero Energy Buildings)
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17 pages, 5002 KiB  
Article
BIM-Based Human Machine Interface (HMI) Framework for Energy Management
by Taewook Kang
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8861; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218861 - 26 Oct 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2773
Abstract
This study proposes a Building Information Modeling (BIM)-based Human Machine Interface (HMI) framework for intuitive space-based energy management. The BIM-based HMI supports building managers with a method of linking data between BIM and Building Energy Management System (BEMS), which are heterogeneous systems, and [...] Read more.
This study proposes a Building Information Modeling (BIM)-based Human Machine Interface (HMI) framework for intuitive space-based energy management. The BIM-based HMI supports building managers with a method of linking data between BIM and Building Energy Management System (BEMS), which are heterogeneous systems, and provides space-based real-time energy monitoring. This study also proposes a BIM and BEMS data linking framework for systematic BIM-based HMI development. Towards this end, the BIM-based HMI framework was defined after deriving the considerations and requirements necessary for linking the energy control point and BIM through a questionnaire designed by practitioners. Through case analysis, the authors implemented BIM-based HMI and analyzed its effects. The results of the analysis confirmed the positive effects (3.9/5.0) on the connectivity of BIM-based HMI, the benefits (4.3/5.0) for real-time data monitoring, the system function expandability, and the BIM-based spatial intuitiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Zero Energy Buildings)
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