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Topical Collection "Sustainable Electric Power Systems Research"

A topical collection in Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This collection belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tomonobu Senjyu

Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara-cho Nakagami Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 098-895-8686
Interests: renewable energy, power system analysis, power system optimization, distribution system control and optimization, power system control, power electronics in power systems

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Renewable energy systems, such as photovoltaic and wind power systems, are being introduced into power systems. The systems do not emit CO2 for generation, and system costs have been going down rapidly in recent years. Generated power depends on weather conditions, such as solar insolation and wind speed. The fluctuating generated power influences power systems; the voltage and frequency of the power systems can be changed suddenly; therefore, the power quality in power systems is strongly deteriorated. The control strategies and operation methods for power systems should be optimized in power systems with a high penetration of renewable systems. Moreover, high-power switching devices are now being developed, which can provide high-power electronic equipment for power systems. The power quality will increase with the use of power converters and inverters. This is another hot research topic in power engineer communities. This collection of Sustainability will present novel challenges for power system analysis, control, and optimization, including renewable energy and distributed generators in power systems.

Prof. Dr. Tomonobu Senjyu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Renewable energy
  • Photovoltaic systems
  • Wind energy conversion systems
  • Power system analysis, control, and optimization
  • Distribution systems
  • Voltage and frequency control in power systems
  • Reliability for power supply
  • Demand side management and demand response
  • High voltage direct current (HVDC) systems
  • Remote-area power systems
  • Distributed generators

Published Papers (2 papers)

2019

Open AccessArticle Estimating the Cost of Solar Generation Uncertainty and the Impact of Collocated Energy Storage: The Case of Korea
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1389; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051389
Received: 29 January 2019 / Revised: 26 February 2019 / Accepted: 28 February 2019 / Published: 6 March 2019
PDF Full-text (2851 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As a major option for reducing greenhouse gas emission and sustainable development, renewable generation is rapidly expanding in the power sector. However, the variability and uncertainty of renewable generation undermine the reliability of the power system, requiring additional reserve capacities. This study estimates [...] Read more.
As a major option for reducing greenhouse gas emission and sustainable development, renewable generation is rapidly expanding in the power sector. However, the variability and uncertainty of renewable generation undermine the reliability of the power system, requiring additional reserve capacities. This study estimates the costs induced by additional reserve capacities to reduce the uncertainty of solar generation in the Korean power system and analyzes the effectiveness of the Energy Storage System (ESS) in reducing these costs, using the stochastic form of multi-period security-constraint optimal power flow. To determine the input of stochastic solar generation, an ARMAX model and Monte Carlo method are applied for representative solar farms. The results indicate solar power generation by 2029 would increase the required reserve by 56.2% over the current level but coupling a 10 GWh of lithium-ion ESS would reduce it by 61.1% compared to increased reserve level for 2029. The operating cost reduction (benefit) by ESS would be 80.8% higher in 2029 compared to the current level and cover 89.9% of its installation cost. The benefit of ESS will be improved when (1) offer prices of reserves correctly reflect the true opportunity cost of providing reserve services and (2) more variable renewable energies are deployed. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Are Renewables as Friendly to Humans as to the Environment?: A Social Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Electricity
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1370; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051370
Received: 8 February 2019 / Revised: 18 February 2019 / Accepted: 1 March 2019 / Published: 5 March 2019
PDF Full-text (3993 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The adoption of renewable energy technologies in developing nations is recognized to have positive environmental impacts; however, what are their effects on the electricity supply chain workers? This article provides a quantitative analysis on this question through a relatively new framework called social [...] Read more.
The adoption of renewable energy technologies in developing nations is recognized to have positive environmental impacts; however, what are their effects on the electricity supply chain workers? This article provides a quantitative analysis on this question through a relatively new framework called social life cycle assessment, taking Malaysia as a case example. Impact assessments by the authors show that electricity from renewables has greater adverse impacts on supply chain workers than the conventional electricity mix: Electricity production with biomass requires 127% longer labor hours per unit-electricity under the risk of human rights violations, while the solar photovoltaic requires 95% longer labor hours per unit-electricity. However, our assessment also indicates that renewables have less impacts per dollar-spent. In fact, the impact of solar photovoltaic would be 60% less than the conventional mix when it attains grid parity. The answer of “are renewables as friendly to humans as to the environment?” is “not-yet, but eventually.” Full article
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Graphical abstract

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