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Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (22 July 2022) | Viewed by 19471

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, University Federico II of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: nutrition; metabolism; lipid metabolism; gastrointestinal disorders; diarrhea; intestinal infection; pediatric gastroenterology; nutritional rehabilitation; intestinal failure; clinical nutrition; pediatric nutrition
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dietary intake in childhood can affect children's physical and cognitive development. It also has health consequences later in life.

The goal of this Special Issue, “Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries”, is focused on the different food patterns between countries, underlining the differences of genetic background, household environment and dietary pattern.

Specifically, the aim is to stimulate pediatricians and dieticians to share their nutrition programs to highlight the importance of nutritional education, which can be an efficient way to improve nutrition knowledge, attitudes and healthy eating behaviors.

The contributions may include review articles, systematic reviews, clinical cases, retrospective case studies, and proposals for new nutrition education programs appropriate for most children.

Prof. Dr. Maria Immacolata Spagnuolo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • childhood nutrition
  • nutritional education
  • dietary intakes
  • nutrition knowledge
  • eating behaviors
  • countries
  • regions

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 185 KiB  
Editorial
Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries
by Alessia Salatto and Maria Immacolata Spagnuolo
Nutrients 2023, 15(9), 2138; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15092138 - 29 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1037
Abstract
In this Special Issue, titled “Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries”, we give concise and straightforward information on the nutritional habits of children in different countries worldwide [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

22 pages, 379 KiB  
Article
Infant Feeding Practices, Nutrition, and Associated Health Factors during the First Six Months of Life among Syrian Refugees in Greater Beirut, Lebanon: A Mixed Methods Study
by Joana Abou-Rizk, Theresa Jeremias, Lara Nasreddine, Lamis Jomaa, Nahla Hwalla, Jan Frank and Veronika Scherbaum
Nutrients 2022, 14(21), 4459; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14214459 - 23 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3118
Abstract
The objective was to describe infant feeding practices, nutrition and related health aspects of infants under six months among Syrian refugees in Greater Beirut, Lebanon. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Syrian refugee mothers with infants under six months in July–October 2018 (N [...] Read more.
The objective was to describe infant feeding practices, nutrition and related health aspects of infants under six months among Syrian refugees in Greater Beirut, Lebanon. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Syrian refugee mothers with infants under six months in July–October 2018 (N = 114). Additionally, eleven focus group discussions were conducted to explore supportive factors and barriers associated with early breastfeeding practices. The prevalence of pre-lacteal feeding was high (62.5%), whereas early initiation of breastfeeding was low (31%), and exclusive breastfeeding very low (24.6%). One-fifth of the infants were anemic (20.5%) and 9.6% were wasted. A significantly higher proportion of non-exclusively breastfed infants had a fever and took medicines than those who were exclusively breastfed. Supporting factors of adequate infant feeding practices comprised knowledge on maternal nutrition and exclusive breastfeeding, along with receiving support from healthcare professionals and family members. Identified barriers included preterm delivery, pre-lacteal feeding, an at-risk waist circumference and moderate to severe depression among mothers, bottle feeding, early introduction of food, maternal health reasons, breastmilk substitutes’ distribution, and misinformation offered by mothers-in-law. To address sub-optimal feeding practices documented among Syrian refugees, awareness on proper breastfeeding practices, maternal nutrition, and psychosocial support should be provided to mothers and family members alike. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries)
11 pages, 753 KiB  
Article
Effects of Childhood Nutrition Education from School and Family on Eating Habits of Japanese Adults
by Mizuki Kuwahara and Wonsub Eum
Nutrients 2022, 14(12), 2517; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14122517 - 17 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3265
Abstract
Since the Basic Law of Shokuiku (nutrition education) was established in 2005, the Japanese government has been promoting nutrition education among children to encourage better eating habits. This study analyzes the 2019 survey data on people’s attitudes towards nutrition education, in order to [...] Read more.
Since the Basic Law of Shokuiku (nutrition education) was established in 2005, the Japanese government has been promoting nutrition education among children to encourage better eating habits. This study analyzes the 2019 survey data on people’s attitudes towards nutrition education, in order to elucidate the relationship between the results of nutrition education, attitude towards nutrition education and proper eating habits, and the experience of nutrition education. The results reveal that people who received nutrition education at elementary school and middle school tend to have a more positive attitude towards nutrition education. In addition, family conversation on foods during elementary school years has a positive effect on nutritionally balanced eating behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries)
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13 pages, 1040 KiB  
Article
Factors Associated with (Exclusive) Breastfeeding Duration—Results of the SUKIE-Study
by Bernadette Bürger, Karin Schindler, Tanja Tripolt, Antonia Griesbacher, Hans Peter Stüger, Karl-Heinz Wagner, Adelheid Weber and Alexandra Wolf-Spitzer
Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1704; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091704 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3281
Abstract
The WHO European Region has the lowest exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) rates at 6 months in the world. In Austria, 55.5% of infants are EBF at the age of one week, although breastfeeding initiation is 97.5%. The study was conducted in 2019/2020 and considered [...] Read more.
The WHO European Region has the lowest exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) rates at 6 months in the world. In Austria, 55.5% of infants are EBF at the age of one week, although breastfeeding initiation is 97.5%. The study was conducted in 2019/2020 and considered 1214 mothers of legal age, who received four online questionnaires during their child’s first year of life. The influence of different variables on total/exclusive breastfeeding duration were analysed by using a Cox model (Extension of the Cox Proportional Hazards Model) with time-dependent covariates. Multivariate analyses showed a significant influence of maternal BMI, lifestyle factors, such as smoking, and breastfeeding support on total breastfeeding duration. Remarkable differences in the median duration of any breastfeeding were found for breastfeeding support, where mothers breastfed twice as long. Support came primarily from hospital staff, the midwife and the partner. A higher monthly household net income, delivery in a baby-friendly certified hospital (BFH) and breastfeeding support were associated with a longer EBF duration. Obese mothers started feeding infant formula earlier and had a higher risk of early weaning. The results offer valuable insights into the importance of breastfeeding-friendly structures such as BFHs, a focus on breastfeeding aftercare and support of the mother to promote and protect breastfeeding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries)
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14 pages, 1212 KiB  
Article
Early Life Nutrition and the Role of Complementary Feeding on Later Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Children up to 3 Years of Age
by María Gómez-Martín, David Herrero-Morín, Silvia Arboleya, Miguel Gueimonde and Sonia González
Nutrients 2022, 14(8), 1664; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14081664 - 16 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3171
Abstract
The first years of life represent a window of opportunity to establish proper dietary patterns and to maintain them over time. Our aim was to describe the diet of a cohort of Spanish children, from 2 to 36 months, and to identify the [...] Read more.
The first years of life represent a window of opportunity to establish proper dietary patterns and to maintain them over time. Our aim was to describe the diet of a cohort of Spanish children, from 2 to 36 months, and to identify the components that could influence the quality of the diet at 24 and 36 months of age. This was a longitudinal prospective study analyzing information from administered questionnaires about general characteristics and food frequency consumption in 97 full-term babies. At 2–3 months of age, only 53.6% of infants were observed to be breastfed. The intake of animal foodstuffs from 12 to 36 months was higher than national recommendations, and the contrary was true for fruits and vegetables. The intake of vitamin D was below European Food Safety Authority recommendations. Moreover, energy intake at 6 months was inversely associated with Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) at 24 months, whereas vegetables intake was positively associated with MDS at 36 months. These results could be useful in the creation of future guidelines focused on the promotion of breastfeeding and healthy early-life food habits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries)
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8 pages, 846 KiB  
Communication
A Life Course Approach to the Prevention of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Indonesia
by Ali Sungkar, Saptawati Bardosono, Rima Irwinda, Nurul R. M. Manikam, Rini Sekartini, Bernie E. Medise, Sri S. Nasar, Siti Helmyati, Anna Surti Ariani, Juntika Nurihsan, Emi Nurjasmi, Levina Chandra Khoe, Charisma Dilantika, Ray Wagiu Basrowi and Yvan Vandenplas
Nutrients 2022, 14(2), 277; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020277 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4756
Abstract
Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has a long-term impact on each life stage and remains worldwide a major public health problem. Eleven experts were invited to participate in a virtual meeting to discuss the present situation and the available intervention to prevent iron deficiency [...] Read more.
Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has a long-term impact on each life stage and remains worldwide a major public health problem. Eleven experts were invited to participate in a virtual meeting to discuss the present situation and the available intervention to prevent iron deficiency anemia in Indonesia. The experts consisted of obstetric gynecologists, pediatricians, nutritionists, midwives, a clinical psychologist, and an education expert. Existing interventions focus attention on preconception and early childhood stages. Considering the inter-generational effects of IDA, we call attention to expanding strategies to all life stages through integrating political, educational, and nutritional interventions. The experts agreed that health education and nutritional intervention should be started since adolescence. Further research to explore the effectiveness of these interventions would be important for many regions in the world. The outcome of this Indonesian consensus is applicable worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Nutrition in Different Countries)
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