Special Issue "Feeding Practice and Infant and Young Child Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022 | Viewed by 2904

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Piotr Socha
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Public Health Department, Children’s Memorial Health Institute, 04-730 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: feeding disorders; enteral nutrition; parenteral nutrition; liver biopsy; lab diagnostic- fatty acid analysis by GCMS; statistics; GCP; clinical research methodology
Dr. Cristiana Berti
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Paediatric Intermediate Care Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy
Interests: feeding practices; eating behaviour; infants; pregnant women; micronutrients; traditional foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Early childhood feeding practices, especially in the first 2 years of life, are essential to a healthy growth and development, shaping feeding habits that could last a lifetime. The World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) have set a global strategy for optimal infant and young child feeding (IYCF):

  • Early initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hour of birth;
  • Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life;
  • Introduction of nutritionally adequate and safe complementary (solid) foods at 6 months along with continued breastfeeding up to 2 years of age or beyond.

However, many infants and children do not receive optimal feeding, with only around 44% of infants aged 0–6 months being exclusively breastfed during 2015–2020, potentially causing undernutrition resulting in an increased possibility of death, non-communicable diseases and obesity.

This Special Issue will collate recent high-quality research in the field of breastfeeding, weaning and infant and young child health. Submissions focusing on underrepresented populations are welcome, including reports of original research (e.g., longitudinal studies, health promotion intervention studies, qualitative research and epidemiologies) or reviews (e.g., systematic reviews and meta-analyses).

Prof. Dr. Piotr Socha
Dr. Cristiana Berti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • feeding practices
  • infant and young child feeding
  • breastfeeding
  • complementary feeding
  • non-communicable diseases
  • obesity
  • eating habits

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Early Feeding Factors and Eating Behaviors among Children Aged 1–3: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2022, 14(11), 2279; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14112279 - 29 May 2022
Viewed by 578
Abstract
Early nutrition plays a crucial role not only in providing essential nutrients for proper child development, but may also be an important step in creating desirable eating behaviors, which can be transmitted into adulthood. The aim of this study was to assess possible [...] Read more.
Early nutrition plays a crucial role not only in providing essential nutrients for proper child development, but may also be an important step in creating desirable eating behaviors, which can be transmitted into adulthood. The aim of this study was to assess possible links between early feeding factors, such as breastfeeding, complementary feeding (timing and method) as well as types of complementary foods and mealtime environment during the first three months of complementary feeding and eating behaviors in children aged 1–3 years old. This cross-sectional, online survey involved 467 mothers of toddlers aged 1–3 years old from the whole of Poland. The questionnaire consisted of questions about early feeding and the Children’s Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ). The adjusted linear regression model revealed that longer duration of any breastfeeding was negatively related to enjoyment of food (EF), desire to drink (DD) and positively related to satiety responsiveness (SR) and slowness in eating (SE) subscales. Moreover, offering homemade complementary foods more often than commercial may be related to higher SR. Eating meals during distraction seems to be negatively associated with EF, and positively with DD and SE subscales. Our study highlights possible links between early feeding factors and toddlers’ eating behaviors, so further investigation, also including dietary factors, is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Practice and Infant and Young Child Health)
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Article
Evaluation of the Effects of Skin-to-Skin Contact on Newborn Sucking, and Breastfeeding Abilities: A Quasi-Experimental Study Design
Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1846; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091846 - 28 Apr 2022
Viewed by 579
Abstract
Mother and newborn skin-to-skin contact (SSC) after birth has numerous protective effects. Although positive associations between SSC and breastfeeding behavior have been reported, the evidence for such associations between early SSC and breastfeeding success was limited in high-income countries. This quasi-experimental intervention design [...] Read more.
Mother and newborn skin-to-skin contact (SSC) after birth has numerous protective effects. Although positive associations between SSC and breastfeeding behavior have been reported, the evidence for such associations between early SSC and breastfeeding success was limited in high-income countries. This quasi-experimental intervention design study aimed to evaluate the impact of different SSC regimens on newborn breastfeeding outcomes in Taiwan. In total, 104 healthy mother–infant dyads (52 in the intervention group and 52 in the control group) with normal vaginal delivery were enrolled from 1 January to 30 July 2019. The intervention group received 60 min of immediate SSC, whereas the control group received routine care (early SSC with 20 min duration). Breastfeeding performance was evaluated by the IBFAT and BSES-Short Form. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. In the intervention group, the breastfeeding ability of newborns increased significantly after 5 min of SSC and after SSC. The intervention also improved the total score for breastfeeding self-efficacy (0.18 point; p = 0.003). GEE analysis revealed that the interaction between group and time was significant (0.65 point; p = 0.003). An initial immediate SSC regimen of 60 min can significantly improve neonatal breastfeeding ability and maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy in the short term after birth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Practice and Infant and Young Child Health)
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Article
The Relationship between Breastfeeding and Initial Vegetable Introduction with Vegetable Consumption in a National Cohort of Children Ages 1–5 Years from Low-Income Households
Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1740; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091740 - 22 Apr 2022
Viewed by 541
Abstract
Compared to other food groups, vegetable intakes are lowest relative to recommendations. Breastfeeding and initial introduction to vegetables may help infants establish long-lasting taste preferences. We examined the relationship between breastfeeding and initial vegetable introduction and vegetable intake in early childhood (ages 13–60 [...] Read more.
Compared to other food groups, vegetable intakes are lowest relative to recommendations. Breastfeeding and initial introduction to vegetables may help infants establish long-lasting taste preferences. We examined the relationship between breastfeeding and initial vegetable introduction and vegetable intake in early childhood (ages 13–60 months). This repeated cross-sectional study used data from the national WIC Infant and Toddler Feeding Practices Study-2 collected from low-income mother/caregivers about infants from around birth through age 5 (60 months; n = 3773). Survey-weighted adjusted regression models assessed associations between breastfeeding and vegetable introduction measures with vegetable consumption at child ages 13, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. Longer breastfeeding duration was associated with a slightly, but significantly, greater variety of vegetables consumed/day in early childhood. There was also a small but positive statistically significant association between the number of different types of vegetables consumed on a given day at 9 months and the amount and variety of vegetables consumed/day in early childhood. Age of initial vegetables introduction and whether vegetables were the first/second food introduced were not consistently related to the amount or variety of vegetables consumed later in childhood. Longer breastfeeding and introduction to a greater variety of vegetables at 9 months may be behaviors to target to increase consumption of a greater variety of vegetables by young children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Practice and Infant and Young Child Health)
Article
Children Receiving a Nutrition and High-Quality Early Childhood Education Intervention Are Associated with Greater Math and Fluid Intelligence Scores: The Guatemala City Municipal Nurseries
Nutrients 2022, 14(7), 1366; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071366 - 25 Mar 2022
Viewed by 768
Abstract
Background: About 47% of children < 5 years of age are stunted in Guatemala. In this study, the investigators aimed to compare growth and cognitive outcomes between children in second grade that attended five Guatemala City Municipal Nurseries (GCMN) vs. same sex, grade, [...] Read more.
Background: About 47% of children < 5 years of age are stunted in Guatemala. In this study, the investigators aimed to compare growth and cognitive outcomes between children in second grade that attended five Guatemala City Municipal Nurseries (GCMN) vs. same sex, grade, and age-matched children. Methods: A cross-sectional design nested in a retrospective cohort was implemented between 2015 and 2019. Children that attended the GCMN and matched controls completed a math test and validated receptive language and fluid intelligence tests. The primary caregivers completed a sociodemographic survey. General and generalized linear mixed effect models were used to compare children that attended the GCMN vs. controls. The models were adjusted by maternal education, sex, asset score, and other relevant covariates. Results: Children that attended the GCMN exhibited greater math and fluid intelligence scores relative to the controls in the adjusted models (ß = 6.48; 95% CI (2.35–10.61)) and (ß = 1.20; 95% CI (0.12–2.29)), respectively. Lower odds of stunting were significant for children who went to any early childcare institution (AOR = 0.28; 95% CI (0.09–0.89)). Conclusions: The importance of integrating nutrition and high-quality early childhood education interventions in cognitive and growth outcomes is highlighted in this study. The GCMN model may be a scalable model in similar low-resource settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feeding Practice and Infant and Young Child Health)
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