nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Bee Products in Human Health

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2024) | Viewed by 56491

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Apicultural Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
Interests: bee products; dietary supplements; polyphenol; gut health; gut microbiota; inflammatory bowel diseases;
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pharmacognosy Group, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala University, Biomedical Centre, Box 574, 751 23 Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: biologically active natural products; bee products

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, Nanchang University, Nanchang, China
Interests: phytochemistry; plant food; Metabolomic analysis

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chair of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: bee products; phytochemistry; bioactive compounds; food analytical chemistry; nutritional composition of food; health risk assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Honey bee products, including honey, royal jelly, propolis, bee venom, and bee pollen, or their bioactive chemical constituents, demonstrate interesting nutritional values and therapeutic potential. The biological properties of bee products as immunoregulation, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and antimicrobial agents have prompted preclinical/clinical investigation and applications. The effectiveness of bee products for human health has been documented in various reports, which have extensive uses and applications.

In this Special Issue of Nutrients, we would like to invite authors to submit original manuscripts with the scope of the proposed topics. Submissions of original research; reviews of current scientific literature, including systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and short reports are welcomed. We believe that this Special Issue, “Bee Products in Human health.”, will highlight the most recent advances on the preclinical and clinical applications of nutraceutical properties in bee products.

Dr. Kai Wang
Dr. Hesham El-Seedi
Prof. Dr. Liping Luo
Dr. Aleksandar Ž. Kostić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (16 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

22 pages, 6050 KiB  
Article
Ethanolic Extract of Propolis and CAPE as Cardioprotective Agents against LPS and IFN-α Stressed Cardiovascular Injury
by Anna Kurek-Górecka, Małgorzata Kłósek, Grażyna Pietsz, Radosław Balwierz, Paweł Olczyk and Zenon P. Czuba
Nutrients 2024, 16(5), 627; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16050627 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1220
Abstract
The inflammatory process is triggered by several factors such as toxins, pathogens, and damaged cells, promoting inflammation in various systems, including the cardiovascular system, leading to heart failure. The link between periodontitis as a chronic inflammatory disease and cardiovascular disease is confirmed. Propolis [...] Read more.
The inflammatory process is triggered by several factors such as toxins, pathogens, and damaged cells, promoting inflammation in various systems, including the cardiovascular system, leading to heart failure. The link between periodontitis as a chronic inflammatory disease and cardiovascular disease is confirmed. Propolis and its major component, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), exhibit protective mechanisms and anti-inflammatory effects on the cardiovascular system. The objective of the conducted study was to assess the anti-inflammatory effects of the Polish ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) and its major component—CAPE—in interferon-alpha (IFN-α), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS + IFN-α-induced human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1). EEP and CAPE were used at 10–100 µg/mL. A multiplex assay was used for interleukin and adhesive molecule detection. Our results demonstrate that EEP, at a concentration of 25 µg/mL, decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in LPS-induced HGF-1. At the same concentration, EEP increases the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in LPS + IFN-α-induced HGF-1. In the case of CAPE, IL-6 in LPS and LPS + IFN-α induced HGF-1 was decreased in all concentrations. However, in the case of IL-10, CAPE causes the highest increase at 50 µg/mL in IFN-α induced HGF-1. Regarding the impact of EEP on adhesion molecules, there was a noticeable reduction of E-selectin by EEP at 25, 50, and100 µg/mL in IFN-α -induced HGF-1. In a range of 10–100 µg/mL, EEP decreased endothelin-1 (ET-1) during all stimulations. CAPE statistically significantly decreases the level of ET-1 at 25–100 µg/mL in IFN-α and LPS + IFN-α. In the case of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), EEP and CAPE downregulated its expression in a non-statistically significant manner. Based on the obtained results, EEP and CAPE may generate beneficial cardiovascular effects by influencing selected factors. EEP and CAPE exert an impact on cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4150 KiB  
Article
All That Glitters Is Not Gold: Assessment of Bee Pollen Supplementation Effects on Gastric Mucosa
by Paweł Oszczędłowski, Kamil Górecki, Aleksandra Greluk, Milena Krawczyk, Katarzyna Pacyna, Jan Andrzej Kędzierawski, Artur Kacper Ziółko, Karol Chromiak, Mirosław A. Sławiński, Przemysław Raczkiewicz, Patrycja Chylińska-Wrzos, Barbara Jodłowska-Jędrych and Agnieszka Pedrycz-Wieczorska
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010037 - 21 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1264
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bee pollen supplementation on the levels of enzymes important for gastric mucosal homeostasis, namely cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and a biomarker—asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)—in the gastric mucosa of [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bee pollen supplementation on the levels of enzymes important for gastric mucosal homeostasis, namely cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and a biomarker—asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)—in the gastric mucosa of Wistar rats. The experimental phase divided the rats into four groups: two control groups, sedentary and active, both not supplemented, and two experimental groups, sedentary and active, supplemented with bee pollen. The results indicated that bee pollen supplementation reduced the levels of COX-1 and elevated iNOS levels, while showing no significant impact on COX-2 levels. These findings do not conclusively support the gastroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of bee pollen on gastric mucosa. However, the supplementation could have resulted in reduced ADMA levels in the physically active supplemented group. Our study does not unequivocally demonstrate the positive effects of bee pollen supplementation on the gastric mucosa, which may be attributed to the specific metabolism and bioavailability of substances within unprocessed, dried bee pollen. Further research should explore the topic of potential therapeutic applications of bee pollen in gastrointestinal health and its interactions with ADMA signaling pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 6245 KiB  
Article
Integration with Transcriptomic and Metabolomic Analyses Reveals the In Vitro Cytotoxic Mechanisms of Chinese Poplar Propolis by Triggering the Glucose Metabolism in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells
by Yuyang Guo, Zhengxin Liu, Qian Wu, Zongze Li, Jialin Yang and Hongzhuan Xuan
Nutrients 2023, 15(20), 4329; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15204329 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1556
Abstract
Natural products serve as a valuable reservoir of anticancer agents. Chinese poplar propolis (CP) has exhibited remarkable antitumor activities, yet its precise mechanisms of action remain elusive. This study aims to elucidate the in vitro cytotoxic mechanisms of CP in human hepatocellular carcinoma [...] Read more.
Natural products serve as a valuable reservoir of anticancer agents. Chinese poplar propolis (CP) has exhibited remarkable antitumor activities, yet its precise mechanisms of action remain elusive. This study aims to elucidate the in vitro cytotoxic mechanisms of CP in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) through comprehensive transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses. Our evidence suggested that CP possesses a great potential to inhibit the proliferation of HepG2 cells by targeting the glucose metabolism. Notably, CP exhibited a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the viability of HepG2 cells. Transcriptome sequencing unveiled significant alterations in the cellular metabolism, particularly within glucose metabolism pathways. CP effectively restrained glucose consumption and lactic acid production. Moreover, the CP treatment led to a substantial decrease in the mRNA expression levels of key glucose transporters (GLUT1 and GLUT3) and glycolytic enzymes (LDHA, HK2, PKM2, and PFK). Correspondingly, CP suppressed some key protein levels. Cellular metabolomic analysis demonstrated a marked reduction in intermediary products of glucose metabolism, specifically fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and acetyl-CoA, following CP administration. Finally, key compounds in CP were screened, and apigenin, pinobanksin, pinocembrin, and galangin were identified as potential active agents against glycolysis. It indicates that the effectiveness of propolis in inhibiting liver cancer is the result of the combined action of several components. These findings underscore the potential therapeutic value of propolis in the treatment of liver cancer by targeting glycolytic pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 3727 KiB  
Article
Effects of Major Royal Jelly Proteins on the Immune Response and Gut Microbiota Composition in Cyclophosphamide-Treated Mice
by Wenqian Wang, Xiangxin Li, Dan Li, Fei Pan, Xiaoming Fang, Wenjun Peng and Wenli Tian
Nutrients 2023, 15(4), 974; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15040974 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2320
Abstract
Increasing evidence suggests that royal jelly (RJ) has exceptional biological properties, and that major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the key active factors in RJ. The objective of this study was to compare the difference in the protein content between RJ and MRJPs [...] Read more.
Increasing evidence suggests that royal jelly (RJ) has exceptional biological properties, and that major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the key active factors in RJ. The objective of this study was to compare the difference in the protein content between RJ and MRJPs using non-labeled, quantitative proteomics technology, and to investigate the adjustment features and mechanisms of MRJPs on murine immune functions and the composition of intestinal flora in cyclophosphamide-treated mice. Results showed that, during the process of extracting MRJPs, the ratio of the protein types in the main protein and other proteins decreased significantly, except for MRJP1 and MRJP7, which demonstrated that an enriching effect of MRJP1 and MRJP7 was present during the extraction process. Cyclophosphamide-induced mice were orally administered MRJPs. Results showed that the middle-dose group, which received 0.25 g/(kg·bw) of royal jelly main protein, demonstrated a clear impact on the development of the spleen and liver, the quantity of peripheral blood leukocytes, immunoglobulin content, immune factor level, and the proliferation ability of spleen lymphocytes. A 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing technology analysis showed that MRJPs could improve the component and richness of intestinal flora and raise the immunity of mice. The above-mentioned results indicated that the application of MRJPs is very likely to have an advantage effect on murine immune functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1089 KiB  
Article
Determinants of Honey and Other Bee Products Use for Culinary, Cosmetic, and Medical Purposes
by Iwona Kowalczuk, Jerzy Gębski, Dagmara Stangierska and Agata Szymańska
Nutrients 2023, 15(3), 737; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15030737 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2822
Abstract
Bee products have been used for centuries for culinary, medicinal, and cosmetic purposes, and their properties are still a subject of research, which provide new arguments in favour of their use. The research aimed to determine the current state of use of bee [...] Read more.
Bee products have been used for centuries for culinary, medicinal, and cosmetic purposes, and their properties are still a subject of research, which provide new arguments in favour of their use. The research aimed to determine the current state of use of bee products by Polish consumers and determine the ways and conditions of their use, with particular reference to the level of nutritional knowledge and health status. The survey was conducted using the CAWI (Computer-Assisted Web Interview) method on 487 respondents. It was found that honey is used mainly for culinary purposes and, to a lesser extent, for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. Other bee products are much less commonly used than honey—mainly beeswax and royal jelly for cosmetic purposes and propolis and bee pollen for medicinal purposes. Segments distinguished by the frequency of use of honey for particular purposes were differentiated by gender, age, income level, use of other bee products, and motivation to use them. Their differences were also found in terms of the level of nutritional knowledge and self-assessed health status—the highest ratings in both categories were indicated by representatives of the Honey users’ segment, which consisted of people who use honey most frequently for cooking, cosmetic and medicinal purposes. Regression analysis additionally showed that higher levels of nutritional knowledge and better health status were associated with the use of honey to treat gastrointestinal ailments and with the use of propolis for medicinal purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 4503 KiB  
Article
Chemical Characterization of Honey and Its Effect (Alone as well as with Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles) on Microbial Pathogens’ and Human Cancer Cell Lines’ Growth
by Hamed A. Ghramh, Sulaiman A. Alrumman, Irfan Ahmad, Abul Kalam, Serag Eldin I. Elbehairi, Abdulkhaleg M. Alfaify, Mohammed Elimam Ahamed Mohammed, Abdullah G. Al-Sehemi, Mohammad Alfaifi, Badria M. Al-Shehri, Rahaf Mohammed Hussein Alshareef, Wed Mohammed Ali ALaerjani and Khalid Ali Khan
Nutrients 2023, 15(3), 684; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15030684 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2769
Abstract
The antibacterial, anticancer, and wound-healing effects of honey can vary according to the type, geographical region, honey bee species, and source of the flowers. Nanotechnology is an innovative and emerging field of science with an enormous potential role in medical, cosmetics, and industrial [...] Read more.
The antibacterial, anticancer, and wound-healing effects of honey can vary according to the type, geographical region, honey bee species, and source of the flowers. Nanotechnology is an innovative and emerging field of science with an enormous potential role in medical, cosmetics, and industrial usages globally. Metal nanoparticles that derived from silver and range between 1 nm and 100 nm in size are called silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Much advanced research AgNPs has been conducted due to their potential antibacterial and anticancer activity, chemical stability, and ease of synthesis. The purpose of the present study was to explore the physicochemical properties of honey and the potential to use forest honey to synthesize AgNPs as well as to appraise the nanoparticles’ antimicrobial and anticancer effects. Here, we used three different percentages of forest honey (20%, 40%, and 80%) as biogenic mediators to synthesize AgNPs at room temperature. The development of AgNPs was confirmed by color change (to the naked eye) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy studies, respectively. The absorbance peak obtained between 464 to 4720 nm validated both the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band and the formation of AgNPs. Regarding the sugar profile, the contents of maltose and glucose were lower than the content of fructose. In addition, the results showed that the SPR band of AgNPs increased as the percentage of forest honey increased due to the elevation of the concentration of the bio-reducing agent. A bacterial growth kinetic assay indicated the strong antibacterial efficacy of honey with silver nanoparticles against each tested bacterial strain. Honey with nanotherapy was the most effective against hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and colon cancer (HCT 116) cells, with IC50s of 23.9 and 27.4 µg/mL, respectively, while being less effective against breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7), with an IC50 of 32.5 µg/mL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 5573 KiB  
Article
UPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Naturally Derived Apis mellifera Products and Their Promising Effects against Cadmium-Induced Adverse Effects in Female Rats
by Alaa Amr, Aida Abd El-Wahed, Hesham R. El-Seedi, Shaden A. M. Khalifa, Maria Augustyniak, Lamia M. El-Samad, Ahmed E. Abdel Karim and Abeer El Wakil
Nutrients 2023, 15(1), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15010119 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3146
Abstract
Honeybee products arouse interest in society due to their natural origin and range of important biological properties. Propolis (P) and royal jelly (RJ) attract scientists’ attention because they exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-tumor, and immunomodulatory abilities. In this study, we tested whether P [...] Read more.
Honeybee products arouse interest in society due to their natural origin and range of important biological properties. Propolis (P) and royal jelly (RJ) attract scientists’ attention because they exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-tumor, and immunomodulatory abilities. In this study, we tested whether P and RJ could mitigate the adverse effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure, with particular emphasis on the reproductive function in female rats. In this line, one week of pretreatment was established. Six experimental groups were created, including (i) the control group (without any supplementation), (ii) the Cd group (receiving CdCl2 in a dose of 4.5 mg/kg/day), (iii) the P group (50 mg of P/kg/day), (iv) RJ group (200 mg of RJ/kg/day), (v) P + Cd group (rats pretreated with P and then treated with P and Cd simultaneously), (vi) RJ + Cd group (animals pretreated with RJ before receiving CdCl2 simultaneously with RJ). Cd treatment of rats adversely affected a number of measured parameters, including body weight, ovarian structure and ultrastructure, oxidative stress parameters, increased ovarian Cd content and prolonged the estrous cycle. Pretreatment and then cotreatment with P or RJ and Cd alleviated the adverse effects of Cd, transferring the clusters in the PCA analysis chart toward the control group. However, clusters for cotreated groups were still distinctly separated from the control and P, or RJ alone treated groups. Most likely, investigated honeybee products can alter Cd absorption in the gut and/or increase its excretion through the kidneys and/or mitigate oxidative stress by various components. Undoubtedly, pretreatment with P or RJ can effectively prepare the organism to overcome harmful insults. Although the chemical composition of RJ and P is relatively well known, focusing on proportion, duration, and scheme of treatment, as well as the effects of particular components, may provide interesting data in the future. In the era of returning to natural products, both P and RJ seem valuable materials for further consideration as anti-infertility agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2036 KiB  
Article
Supplementation with Queen Bee Larva Powder Extended the Longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans
by Tong Zhao, Liming Wu, Fangfang Fan, Yaning Yang and Xiaofeng Xue
Nutrients 2022, 14(19), 3976; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14193976 - 24 Sep 2022
Viewed by 2747
Abstract
Queen bee larva (QBL) is one kind of important edible insect that is harvested during royal jelly production process. QBL has many physiological functions; however, limited information is available regarding its antiaging effects. In this study, the antiaging function of freeze-dried QBL powder [...] Read more.
Queen bee larva (QBL) is one kind of important edible insect that is harvested during royal jelly production process. QBL has many physiological functions; however, limited information is available regarding its antiaging effects. In this study, the antiaging function of freeze-dried QBL powder (QBLP) was investigated by combining the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) model and transcriptomics. The administration of QBLP to C. elegans was shown to improve lifespan parameters. Additionally, QBLP improved the mobility of nematodes. Transcriptome analysis showed the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were significantly enriched in Gene Ontology (GO) terms that were almost all related to the biological functions of cell metabolism and stress, which are associated with lifespan. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis suggested that the lifespan of C. elegans was related to the longevity regulating pathway-worm. The expression levels of the key genes sod-3, gst-6, hsp-12.6, lips-7, ins-8, and lips-17 were upregulated. sod-3, hsp-12.6, lips-7, and lips-17 are downstream targets of DAF-16, which is an important transcription factor related to lifespan extension. CF1038 (daf-16(mu86)) supplemented with QBLP did not show a life-prolonging. This indicates that the antiaging function of QBLP is closely related to daf-16. Thus, QBLP is a component that could potentially be used as a functional material to ameliorate aging and aging-related symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4226 KiB  
Article
Systems Biology Approaches for Understanding Metabolic Differences Using ‘Multi-Omics’ Profiling of Metabolites in Mice Fed with Honey and Mixed Sugars
by Xing Zheng, Yazhou Zhao, Nenad Naumovski, Wen Zhao, Guan Yang, Xiaofeng Xue, Liming Wu, Daniel Granato, Wenjun Peng and Kai Wang
Nutrients 2022, 14(16), 3445; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14163445 - 22 Aug 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2692
Abstract
Honey is proposed to be the oldest natural sweetener and it is a standard component of several dietary patterns. Recent evidence suggests that replacing sugars, such as fructose, with honey has potential health benefits. In this study, we determined the effects of honey [...] Read more.
Honey is proposed to be the oldest natural sweetener and it is a standard component of several dietary patterns. Recent evidence suggests that replacing sugars, such as fructose, with honey has potential health benefits. In this study, we determined the effects of honey supplementation in mice on cardiometabolic and inflammatory markers and changes in gut microbiota and metabolomic profiles. We compared mice fed a honey diet (1 or 2 g/kg) with those fed an analog diet (mixed fructose, glucose, and sucrose (FSG) solutions) at exact dosages for one month. We found the same blood glucose fluctuating trends for honey- and FGS-fed mice. The honey diets resulted in less weight gain and fewer ballooned hepatocytes. Additionally, honey diets decreased the total serum cholesterol and TNF-α and increased the antioxidant enzyme activity. Each diet type was associated with distinct gut microbiota and metabolomics profiles. Systems biology analysis revealed that Lactococcus spp., Lachnospiraceae spp., and oleamide had the strongest correlations with lipid metabolic networks. Although in an animal model, this study provides a good understanding of the potential benefits of choosing honey rather than mixed sugars in regular dietary patterns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2465 KiB  
Article
Anti-Biofilm Activities of Chinese Poplar Propolis Essential Oil against Streptococcus mutans
by Jie Yuan, Wenqin Yuan, Yuyang Guo, Qian Wu, Fei Wang and Hongzhuan Xuan
Nutrients 2022, 14(16), 3290; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14163290 - 11 Aug 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2263
Abstract
Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is a common cariogenic bacterium that secretes glucosyltransferases (GTFs) to synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) and plays an important role in plaque formation. Propolis essential oil (PEO) is one of the main components of propolis, and its antibacterial [...] Read more.
Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is a common cariogenic bacterium that secretes glucosyltransferases (GTFs) to synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) and plays an important role in plaque formation. Propolis essential oil (PEO) is one of the main components of propolis, and its antibacterial activity has been proven. However, little is known about the potential effects of PEO against S. mutans. We found that PEO has antibacterial effects against S. mutans by decreasing bacterial viability within the biofilm, as demonstrated by the XTT assay, live/dead staining assay, LDH activity assay, and leakage of calcium ions. Furthermore, PEO also suppresses the total of biofilm biomasses and damages the biofilm structure. The underlying mechanisms involved may be related to inhibiting bacterial adhesion and GTFs activity, resulting in decreased production of EPSs. In addition, a CCK8 assay suggests that PEO has no cytotoxicity on normal oral epithelial cells. Overall, PEO has great potential for preventing and treating oral bacterial infections caused by S. mutans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

53 pages, 5405 KiB  
Review
Translational Research on Bee Pollen as a Source of Nutrients: A Scoping Review from Bench to Real World
by Rachid Kacemi and Maria G. Campos
Nutrients 2023, 15(10), 2413; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15102413 - 22 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5011
Abstract
The emphasis on healthy nutrition is gaining a forefront place in current biomedical sciences. Nutritional deficiencies and imbalances have been widely demonstrated to be involved in the genesis and development of many world-scale public health burdens, such as metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In [...] Read more.
The emphasis on healthy nutrition is gaining a forefront place in current biomedical sciences. Nutritional deficiencies and imbalances have been widely demonstrated to be involved in the genesis and development of many world-scale public health burdens, such as metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, bee pollen is emerging as a scientifically validated candidate, which can help diminish conditions through nutritional interventions. This matrix is being extensively studied, and has proven to be a very rich and well-balanced nutrient pool. In this work, we reviewed the available evidence on the interest in bee pollen as a nutrient source. We mainly focused on bee pollen richness in nutrients and its possible roles in the main pathophysiological processes that are directly linked to nutritional imbalances. This scoping review analyzed scientific works published in the last four years, focusing on the clearest inferences and perspectives to translate cumulated experimental and preclinical evidence into clinically relevant insights. The promising uses of bee pollen for malnutrition, digestive health, metabolic disorders, and other bioactivities which could be helpful to readjust homeostasis (as it is also true in the case of anti-inflammatory or anti-oxidant needs), as well as the benefits on cardiovascular diseases, were identified. The current knowledge gaps were identified, along with the practical challenges that hinder the establishment and fructification of these uses. A complete data collection made with a major range of botanical species allows more robust clinical information. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1123 KiB  
Review
Bee Products and Colorectal Cancer—Active Components and Mechanism of Action
by Justyna Moskwa, Sylwia Katarzyna Naliwajko, Dominika Dobiecka and Katarzyna Socha
Nutrients 2023, 15(7), 1614; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15071614 - 27 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3272
Abstract
Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Lifestyle and eating patterns may have a significant impact on the prevention of this type of cancer. Bioactive food ingredients influence the gut microbiome and can have a protective effect. Bee [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Lifestyle and eating patterns may have a significant impact on the prevention of this type of cancer. Bioactive food ingredients influence the gut microbiome and can have a protective effect. Bee products (honey, propolis, royal jelly, and bee venom) or pharmacologically active fractions obtained from them are widely used in many fields of medicine, pharmacy, and cosmetics. Some evidence suggests that bee products may have anti-cancer potential. The main bioactive components with anti-colon cancer potential from propolis and bee honey are polyphenols such as pinocembrin, galangin, luteolin, CAPE, Artepilin C, chrysin, caffeic, and p-coumaric acids. This review is focused on the new data on epidemiology, risk factors for colon cancer, and current reports on the potential role of bee products in the chemoprevention of this type of cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 2344 KiB  
Review
The Utilization of Bee Products as a Holistic Approach to Managing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome-Related Infertility
by Ahmad Ali, Additiya Paramanya, Payal Poojari, Damla Arslan-Acaroz, Ulas Acaroz and Aleksandar Ž. Kostić
Nutrients 2023, 15(5), 1165; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15051165 - 25 Feb 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3721
Abstract
Bee products, including honey, have been utilized since ancient times for nutritional and therapeutic purposes. Recently, other bee products such as bee pollen, royal jelly, and propolis have caught a lot of attention. Being high in antioxidants and bioactive compounds, these products have [...] Read more.
Bee products, including honey, have been utilized since ancient times for nutritional and therapeutic purposes. Recently, other bee products such as bee pollen, royal jelly, and propolis have caught a lot of attention. Being high in antioxidants and bioactive compounds, these products have established their applications in the pharmaceutical field as supplementary or alternative medicines. This review focuses on their use against polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)-related infertility. A systematic search of electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar was conducted from their inceptions up to November 2022. Studies with a small sample size, studies with inconclusive data, and pre-prints have been excluded. A narrative synthesis was performed during draft preparation after the authors independently performed a literature search. A total of 47 studies were finalized for the review. It can be observed that in vivo data on the use of bee products in treating PCOS mostly deals with their use in synergism with the PCOS medicines to enhance their effect and/or curb their side effects; however, clinical trials for the same are limited. With the amount of data being limited, it is difficult to map out the mechanism by which these products act in managing PCOS inside the human body. The review gives detailed insights into the reversal and restorative properties of bee products against the aberrations in reproductive health caused by PCOS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 637 KiB  
Review
Royal Jelly: Beneficial Properties and Synergistic Effects with Chemotherapeutic Drugs with Particular Emphasis in Anticancer Strategies
by Suzy Salama, Qiyang Shou, Aida A. Abd El-Wahed, Nizar Elias, Jianbo Xiao, Ahmed Swillam, Muhammad Umair, Zhiming Guo, Maria Daglia, Kai Wang, Shaden A. M. Khalifa and Hesham R. El-Seedi
Nutrients 2022, 14(19), 4166; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14194166 - 7 Oct 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4580
Abstract
Cancer is one of the major causes of death globally. Currently, various methods are used to treat cancer, including radiotherapy, surgery, and chemotherapy, all of which have serious adverse effects. A healthy lifestyle, especially a nutritional diet, plays a critical role in the [...] Read more.
Cancer is one of the major causes of death globally. Currently, various methods are used to treat cancer, including radiotherapy, surgery, and chemotherapy, all of which have serious adverse effects. A healthy lifestyle, especially a nutritional diet, plays a critical role in the treatment and prevention of many disorders, including cancer. The above notion, plus the trend in going back to nature, encourages consumers and the food industry to invest more in food products and to find potential candidates that can maintain human health. One of these agents, and a very notable food agent, is royal jelly (RJ), known to be produced by the hypopharyngeal and mandibular salivary glands of young nurse honeybees. RJ contains bioactive substances, such as carbohydrates, protein, lipids, peptides, mineral salts and polyphenols which contribute to the appreciated biological and pharmacological activities. Antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and antibacterial impacts are among the well-recognized benefits. The combination of RJ or its constituents with anticancer drugs has synergistic effects on cancer disorders, enhancing the drug’s effectiveness or reducing its side effects. The purpose of the present review is to emphasize the possible interactions between chemotherapy and RJ, or its components, in treating cancer illnesses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 3903 KiB  
Review
General Nutritional Profile of Bee Products and Their Potential Antiviral Properties against Mammalian Viruses
by Syeda Tasmia Asma, Otilia Bobiş, Victoriţa Bonta, Ulas Acaroz, Syed Rizwan Ali Shah, Fatih Ramazan Istanbullugil and Damla Arslan-Acaroz
Nutrients 2022, 14(17), 3579; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14173579 - 30 Aug 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4300
Abstract
Bee products have been extensively employed in traditional therapeutic practices to treat several diseases and microbial infections. Numerous bioactive components of bee products have exhibited several antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, antiprotozoal, hepatoprotective, and immunomodulatory properties. Apitherapy is a form of alternative medicine that [...] Read more.
Bee products have been extensively employed in traditional therapeutic practices to treat several diseases and microbial infections. Numerous bioactive components of bee products have exhibited several antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, antiprotozoal, hepatoprotective, and immunomodulatory properties. Apitherapy is a form of alternative medicine that uses the bioactive properties of bee products to prevent and/or treat different diseases. This review aims to provide an elaborated vision of the antiviral activities of bee products with recent advances in research. Since ancient times, bee products have been well known for their several medicinal properties. The antiviral and immunomodulatory effects of bee products and their bioactive components are emerging as a promising alternative therapy against several viral infections. Numerous studies have been performed, but many clinical trials should be conducted to evaluate the potential of apitherapy against pathogenic viruses. In that direction, here, we review and highlight the potential roles of bee products as apitherapeutics in combating numerous viral infections. Available studies validate the effectiveness of bee products in virus inhibition. With such significant antiviral potential, bee products and their bioactive components/extracts can be effectively employed as an alternative strategy to improve human health from individual to communal levels as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 1593 KiB  
Review
Bee Pollen: Clinical Trials and Patent Applications
by Jari S. Algethami, Aida A. Abd El-Wahed, Mohamed H. Elashal, Hanan R. Ahmed, Esraa H. Elshafiey, Eslam M. Omar, Yahya Al Naggar, Ahmed F. Algethami, Qiyang Shou, Sultan M. Alsharif, Baojun Xu, Awad A. Shehata, Zhiming Guo, Shaden A. M. Khalifa, Kai Wang and Hesham R. El-Seedi
Nutrients 2022, 14(14), 2858; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14142858 - 12 Jul 2022
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 9888
Abstract
Bee pollen is a natural cocktail of floral nectar, flower pollen, enzymes, and salivary secretions produced by honeybees. Bee pollen is one of the bee products most enriched in proteins, polysaccharides, polyphenols, lipids, minerals, and vitamins. It has a significant health and medicinal [...] Read more.
Bee pollen is a natural cocktail of floral nectar, flower pollen, enzymes, and salivary secretions produced by honeybees. Bee pollen is one of the bee products most enriched in proteins, polysaccharides, polyphenols, lipids, minerals, and vitamins. It has a significant health and medicinal impact and provides protection against many diseases, including diabetes, cancer, infectious, and cardiovascular. Bee pollen is commonly promoted as a cost-effective functional food. In particular, bee pollen has been applied in clinical trials for allergies and prostate illnesses, with a few investigations on cancer and skin problems. However, it is involved in several patents and health recipes to combat chronic health problems. This review aimed to highlight the clinical trials and patents involving bee pollen for different cases and to present the role of bee pollen as a supplementary food and a potential product in cosmetic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bee Products in Human Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop