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From Obesity to Eating Disorders: Scaling Up the Evidence

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Obesity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 5949

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Unit of Immunonutrition & Clinical Nutrition, Department of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology, Larissa University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece
Interests: vulnerable populations; pediatric patients; nutrition recommendations; dietary interventions; nutritional status; evidence-based nutrition
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Guest Editor
Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, 1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: male reproductive endocrinology; female reproductive endocrinology; endocrine complications of pregnancy; menopause; research methodology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During recent decades obesity has developed in epidemic proportions globally, greatly exceeding the prevalence of all non-communicable diseases. In parallel, the recent COVID-19 pandemic has inflated mental health issues, including eating disorders. Consequently, a double epidemic emerges, with obesity on the one hand and eating disorders on the other. Although both disorders are related to food intake and body weight, the first is easy to diagnose whereas the second is a silent, hidden one. Nevertheless, both entities are associated with malnutrition and detrimental health issues, especially at young ages.

In this Special Issue of Nutrients we welcome the submission of manuscripts derived from original research or meta-research data. Observational and interventional studies are welcome, parallel to narrative reviews and evidence synthesis, to achieve new insights into the epidemics of obesity and eating disorders

Dr. Maria G. Grammatikopoulou
Prof. Dr. Dimitrios G. Goulis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • overweight
  • bulimia
  • binge eating disorder
  • disordered eating
  • orthorexia nervosa
  • obesity
  • anorexia nervosa
  • eating disorders
  • night eating syndrome
  • malnutrition

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 1947 KiB  
Article
The Prevalence of Disordered Eating Behaviours (DEBs) among Adolescent Female School Students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Azzah Alsheweir, Elizabeth Goyder and Samantha J. Caton
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020281 - 17 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Adolescence is a sensitive stage of life that is particularly vulnerable to nutritional problems, including DEBs. This cross-sectional study aims to explore the prevalence of DEBs among adolescent female school students in four intermediate and secondary schools in the city of Riyadh and [...] Read more.
Adolescence is a sensitive stage of life that is particularly vulnerable to nutritional problems, including DEBs. This cross-sectional study aims to explore the prevalence of DEBs among adolescent female school students in four intermediate and secondary schools in the city of Riyadh and to examine predictors associated with DEBs, including age, BMI and school regions. A total of 416 female students aged 12–19 years took part in this study. Weight and height were measured for students before the EAT-26 test was completed. Overweight and obesity were observed among 37.7% (n = 157) of students, 50.7% (n = 211) had a normal BMI and 11.5% (n = 48) were underweight. Results indicated that 123 (29.6%) students reported an EAT-26 score of 20 or more, indicating a high risk of DEB. Age was a significant predictor of DEB risk (OR = 3.087, 95% CI = 1.228–7.760), with the older age group (16–19 years) reporting a higher risk than the younger age group (12–15 years) (p = 0.017). DEB risk partially differed by school region, but BMI was not a statistically significant predictor. The high-risk group reported more binging (p = 0.008), induced vomiting (p < 0.001), laxative consumption (p < 0.001) and exercising (p < 0.001) compared with the low-risk group. Further research is warranted to understand DEB current patterns and predictors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Obesity to Eating Disorders: Scaling Up the Evidence)
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14 pages, 2671 KiB  
Article
Beat the Clock: Assessment of Night Eating Syndrome and Circadian Rhythm in a Sample of Greek Adults
by Anastasia Blouchou, Vasiliki Chamou, Christos Eleftheriades, Dimitrios Poulimeneas, Katerina-Maria Kontouli, Konstantinos Gkiouras, Alexandra Bargiota, Kalliopi K. Gkouskou, Eirini Rigopoulou, Dimitrios P. Bogdanos, Dimitrios G. Goulis and Maria G. Grammatikopoulou
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020187 - 5 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The night eating syndrome (NES) is characterized by excessive food intake during the evening and night hours, with 25% of the daily intake being consumed post-dinner, paired with ep-isodes of nocturnal food intake, at a frequency of more than twice weekly. The NES [...] Read more.
The night eating syndrome (NES) is characterized by excessive food intake during the evening and night hours, with 25% of the daily intake being consumed post-dinner, paired with ep-isodes of nocturnal food intake, at a frequency of more than twice weekly. The NES has been associated with a misaligned circadian rhythm related to a delay in overall food intake, increased energy and fat consumption. The present cross-sectional study aimed to assess NES in a Greek population and evaluate possible links between NES and chronotype. NES was assessed using the Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ), and circadian rhythm, sleep and mood were evaluated with the Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Mood (SCRAM) questionnaire. A total of 533 adults participated in the study. A relatively high prevalence of NES was revealed, with more than 8.1% (NEQ ≥ 30) of the participants reporting experiencing NES symptoms, depending on the NEQ threshold used. Most participants had the intermediate chronotype. NEQ score was positively associated with the morning chronotype, and SCRAM was negatively related to “Good Sleep”. Each point increment in the depression score was associated with 6% higher odds of NES. The early identification of NES gains importance in clinical practice, in a collective effort aiming to reduce NES symptomatology and its detrimental health effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Obesity to Eating Disorders: Scaling Up the Evidence)
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Review

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15 pages, 839 KiB  
Review
Food Cravings and Obesity in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Considerations
by Katerina Stefanaki, Dimitrios S. Karagiannakis, Melpomeni Peppa, Andromachi Vryonidou, Sophia Kalantaridou, Dimitrios G. Goulis, Theodora Psaltopoulou and Stavroula A. Paschou
Nutrients 2024, 16(7), 1049; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16071049 - 3 Apr 2024
Viewed by 2077
Abstract
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, constitutes a metabolic disorder frequently associated with obesity and insulin resistance (IR). Furthermore, women with PCOS often suffer from excessive anxiety and depression, elicited by low self-esteem due to [...] Read more.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, constitutes a metabolic disorder frequently associated with obesity and insulin resistance (IR). Furthermore, women with PCOS often suffer from excessive anxiety and depression, elicited by low self-esteem due to obesity, acne, and hirsutism. These mood disorders are commonly associated with food cravings and binge eating. Hypothalamic signaling regulates appetite and satiety, deteriorating excessive food consumption. However, the hypothalamic function is incapable of compensating for surplus food in women with PCOS, leading to the aggravation of obesity and a vicious circle. Hyperandrogenism, IR, the reduced secretion of cholecystokinin postprandially, and leptin resistance defined by leptin receptors’ knockout in the hypothalamus have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypothalamic dysfunction and appetite dysregulation. Diet modifications, exercise, and psychological and medical interventions have been applied to alleviate food disorders, interrupting the vicious circle. Cognitive–behavioral intervention seems to be the mainstay of treatment, while the role of medical agents, such as GLP-1 analogs and naltrexone/bupropion, has emerged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Obesity to Eating Disorders: Scaling Up the Evidence)
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