Special Issue "Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Martina Barchitta
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies “G.F. Ingrassia”, University of Catania, Italy. Via S. Sofia, 87, 95123 Catania, Italy
Interests: Nutritional epidemiology; Molecular epidemiology; Public health; Mediterranean diet; Nutrigenetics; Nutrigenomics; Nutriepigenomics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that nutrition is associated with a number of health disorders, and thus, optimal nutrition is essential to ensure health and promote well-being. Furthermore, the integration of socio-demographic data with exposome data and molecular biomarkers measurements provides a fundamental approach to support public health strategies.

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled "Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition", welcomes the submission of original research articles, narrative reviews, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses concerning new evidence on the relationships between diet and health for the translation of science into practice in the context of public health research. I sincerely hope that this Special Issue will improve our knowledge in order to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being in humans.

Dr. Martina Barchitta
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Prevention
  • Biomarkers
  • Exposome

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Food Addiction Mediates the Relationship between Perceived Stress and Body Mass Index in Taiwan Young Adults
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 1951; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071951 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Perceived stress is the degree of stress experienced by an individual in the face of a stressor. Studies have shown that stress affects emotions, leads to behavioral changes, and is likely to trigger physical illnesses. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), stress [...] Read more.
Perceived stress is the degree of stress experienced by an individual in the face of a stressor. Studies have shown that stress affects emotions, leads to behavioral changes, and is likely to trigger physical illnesses. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), stress is classified as a health epidemic of the 21st century; in the meantime, the percentage of adults being overweight and with obesity has continued to grow after reaching 38.9% in 2016. Hence, it is unclear whether perceived stress has become a factor affecting progressive obesity and whether food addiction (FA) is an intermediate factor. The purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the FA prevalence among young adults in Taiwan, (2) understand correlations among perceived stress, FA, and the body mass index (BMI), and (3) determine the potential mediating effect of FA due to perceived stress on BMI. The study was conducted through an online questionnaire, composed of a basic data form, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS). We received 1994 responses and analyzed 1780 valid samples. Results showed that 231 participants met the FA criteria, accounting for 12.98%. Perceived stress was positively correlated with BMI (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.013~0.088, p-value 7.8 × 10−3), and perceived stress was positively associated to FA (95% CI 1.099~1.154, p-value < 10−4), which was also positively correlated with BMI (95% CI 0.705~2.176, p-value 10−4). FA significantly mediated the relationship between PSS and BMI with an indirect effect size of 25.18% and 25.48% in the group that scored 31~40 on the PSS. The study concluded that among people seeking weight loss, proper stress management and screening for FA in order to apply related therapies may be an effective method for weight management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Self-Efficacy and Motivation to Follow a Healthy Diet on Life Satisfaction of Patients with Cardiovascular Disease: A Longitudinal Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 1903; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071903 - 27 Jun 2020
Abstract
Today, cardiovascular disease has a great impact on the global population due to its high prevalence. One challenge that cardiovascular patients face to achieve a better prognosis is to follow a healthy diet. This study focused on psychological factors linked to adaptation to [...] Read more.
Today, cardiovascular disease has a great impact on the global population due to its high prevalence. One challenge that cardiovascular patients face to achieve a better prognosis is to follow a healthy diet. This study focused on psychological factors linked to adaptation to a healthy diet in these patients. The main objective was to analyze the interrelationship between motivation to follow a healthy diet and self-efficacy to adhere to the Mediterranean diet with life satisfaction over time. The sample consisted of cardiovascular patients who were assessed at three measurement moments (NT1 = 755; NT2 = 593; NT3 = 323, average interval time: nine months). Correlation analyses showed that self-efficacy, motivation, and life satisfaction followed a pattern of positive relations across the three measurements. A time effect over the study variables was also observed. The results of path analyses showed that self-efficacy positively predicted autonomous motivation, which in turn was associated with patients’ life satisfaction. This interrelation was stable over a period of 18 months. Moreover, life satisfaction predicted self-efficacy nine months later. Psychological interventions might be a positive resource for cardiovascular patients, since psychological variables influence their life satisfaction and their subsequent quality of life in their new health condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Vitamin D Serum Levels in the UK Population, including a Mathematical Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Vitamin D Fortified Ready-to-Eat Breakfast Cereals: Application of the NDNS Database
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1868; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061868 - 23 Jun 2020
Abstract
Vitamin D status is relatively poor in the general population, potentially leading to various conditions. The present study evaluates the relationship between vitamin D status and intake in the UK population and the impact of vitamin D fortified ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) on this [...] Read more.
Vitamin D status is relatively poor in the general population, potentially leading to various conditions. The present study evaluates the relationship between vitamin D status and intake in the UK population and the impact of vitamin D fortified ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) on this status via data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS: 2008–2012). Four cohorts were addressed: ages 4–10 (n = 803), ages 11–18 (n = 884), ages 19–64 (n = 1655) and ages 65 and higher (n = 428). The impact of fortification by 4.2 μg vitamin D per 100 g of RTEC on vitamin D intake and status was mathematically modelled. Average vitamin D daily intake was age-dependent, ranging from ~2.6 (age range 4–18 years) to ~5.0 μg (older than 64 years). Average 25(OH)D concentration ranged from 43 to 51 nmol/L, the highest in children. The relationship between vitamin D intake and status followed an asymptotic curve with a predicted plateau concentration ranging from 52 in children to 83 nmol/L in elderly. The fortification model showed that serum concentrations increased with ~1.0 in children to ~6.5 nmol/L in the elderly. This study revealed that vitamin D intake in the UK population is low with 25(OH)D concentrations being suboptimal for general health. Fortification of breakfast cereals can contribute to improve overall vitamin D status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Dietary Antioxidant Intake and Human Papillomavirus Infection: Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Study in Italy
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1384; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051384 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
Several lines of evidence suggested that antioxidants might play a protective role against high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection and cervical cancer. However, the effect of combined intake of antioxidants has not been investigated thus far. The current cross-sectional study aimed to understand the [...] Read more.
Several lines of evidence suggested that antioxidants might play a protective role against high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection and cervical cancer. However, the effect of combined intake of antioxidants has not been investigated thus far. The current cross-sectional study aimed to understand the relationship between dietary antioxidant intake and the risk of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) infection among 251 Italian women with normal cervical cytology. Women were tested for hrHPV using the Digene HC2 HPV DNA Test. Dietary antioxidant intakes were assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, and a Composite Dietary Antioxidant Index (CDAI) was constructed on the basis of zinc, selenium, manganese, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoid, and flavonoid intake. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the associations of antioxidant intakes or CDAI with hrHPV status, adjusting for age, smoking status, body mass index, parity, educational level, marital status, and use of multivitamins and oral contraceptives. We first observed that hrHPV-positive women (n = 84) reported lower intake of zinc, manganese, and vitamins A and C than non-infected women. Specifically, we found a negative association between dietary intake of zinc and hrHPV-positive status when all antioxidants were considered simultaneously (OR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27–0.80; p = 0.006). With respect to cumulative dietary antioxidant intake, we demonstrated that women with high CDAI (third tertile) had lower odds of being hrHPV-positive than those with low CDAI (first tertile) (OR = 0.39; 95% CI = 0.18–0.85; p = 0.018). To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that a diet based on the combined intake of nutrients with antioxidant properties might reduce the risk of hrHPV infection. However, further research is needed to understand whether dietary antioxidant intake is associated with hrHPV infection or its persistence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Bone Health in Ovariectomized Rats
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1270; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051270 - 30 Apr 2020
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a pressing concern facing public health, thus making research into the effects of nutrients on bone health particularly important. Evidence from preclinical studies using animal models and a limited number of studies in human suggests that olive oil (OO) is a [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a pressing concern facing public health, thus making research into the effects of nutrients on bone health particularly important. Evidence from preclinical studies using animal models and a limited number of studies in human suggests that olive oil (OO) is a protective agent for bone. The aim of this work is to study the effects of virgin olive oil (VOO) consumption by ovariectomized rats on bone health. A total of 48 6-month-old female Wistar rats weighing 320 ± 10 g (mean ± SD) were divided into the following groups: SHAM (n = 12), simulated intervention; OVX (n = 12), ovariectomized; OVX + 100 (n = 12), ovariectomized and treated with VOO (100 µL/day by oral gavage); and OVX + 200 (n = 12) ovariectomized and treated with VOO (200 µL/day by oral gavage), all over 3 months. Femoral (F) and lumbar (L) bone mineral density (FBMD and LBMD), microtomographic parameters, fractal dimension D2D and D3D, and biomechanical properties were studied. After 3 months of VOO treatment, although FBMD and LBMD were not affected, bone quality was improved, as the elasticity of bone and fractal dimension (complexity of bone) were more similar to healthy bone. Our results support the findings of previous research suggesting that dietary intake of olive oil may exert beneficial effect on some bone characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Factors Associated with Frequency of Peanut Consumption in Korea: A National Population-Based Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1207; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051207 - 25 Apr 2020
Abstract
Household peanut exposure via skin in infants with impaired skin barrier function is a risk factor for peanut allergy development. The aim of this study is to investigate the peanut consumption of Koreans using national representative data. We used data from the Korean [...] Read more.
Household peanut exposure via skin in infants with impaired skin barrier function is a risk factor for peanut allergy development. The aim of this study is to investigate the peanut consumption of Koreans using national representative data. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2012–2016, consisting of data from 17,625 adults who complete the survey. Peanut intake was assessed using a 24-h recall method. Of the study population, 10,552 (59.9%), 6726 (38.2%), and 347 (1.9%) subjects were categorized into non-intake, intermittent intake, and frequent intake group, respectively. Ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between sociodemographic and dietary factors and the frequency of peanut intake. After adjusting for confounders, increasing age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–1.04), higher education (high school graduates: aOR 1.75, 95 CI 1.39–2.19; higher than college: aOR 2.11, 95% CI 1.65–2.70), and prudent dietary scores in the second (aOR 1.71; 95% CI 1.47–1.99), third (aOR 2.53; 95% CI 2.16–2.97) and the fourth quartiles (aOR 3.72; 95%CI 3.16–4.40) were associated with a high frequency of peanut consumption. This information may be helpful not only in public health research for nutrition but also in personal management for the prevention of peanut allergy in Korea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Topics in Public Health Nutrition)
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