Special Issue "New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Antonella Amato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Palermo, Biol Chem & Pharmaceut Sci & Technol STEBICEF, I-90128 Palermo, Italy
Interests: obesity; high fat diet; glucose dysmetabolism; dyslipidemia; obesity-related neurodegeneration; functional foods; dietary supplements

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrients is planning a Special Issue on the roles of natural bioactive compounds contained in dietary supplements and functional foods in the maintenance of a good health status. Usually, bioactive compounds underlying the health-related effects of functional foods and dietary supplements consumption have strong antioxidant activity. As oxidative stress and inflammation are considered the major triggering factors in chronic disease development, the chronic intake of natural bioactive compounds could be considered a useful tool to prevent and/or treat chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, obesity and related comorbidities, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms by which these beneficial compounds exert their beneficial effects require further study.

Authors are invited to submit proposals for manuscripts that fit the objectives and topics of this Special Issue. In particular, manuscripts presenting basic, applied, and clinical research; observational and meta-analysis studies; and analytical reviews on the beneficial roles of natural bioactive compounds in dietary supplements and healthy foods are encouraged.

Dr. Antonella Amato
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dietary supplements
  • natural bioactive compounds
  • functional foods
  • antioxidant activity
  • chronic degenerative disease

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Gum Arabic (Acacia senegal) on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Adults at Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010194 - 09 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1152
Abstract
Gum Arabic (GA) is a widely-used additive in food processing, but is also historically used in a number of traditional therapies. It has been shown to have a broad range of health benefits, particularly in improving important cardiovascular risk indicators. Metabolic syndrome and [...] Read more.
Gum Arabic (GA) is a widely-used additive in food processing, but is also historically used in a number of traditional therapies. It has been shown to have a broad range of health benefits, particularly in improving important cardiovascular risk indicators. Metabolic syndrome and its associated cardiac outcomes are a significant burden on modern healthcare systems, and complementary interventions to aid in its management are required. We aimed to examine the effect of GA on those with, or at risk of, metabolic syndrome to identify an effect on improving important disease parameters related to cardiovascular outcomes. A single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to identify the effects of daily GA supplementation on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 80 participants were randomized to receive 20 g of GA daily (n = 40) or placebo (1 g pectin, n = 40) for 12 weeks. Key endpoints included body-anthropometric indices, diet and physical activity assessment, and blood chemistry (HbA1c, fasting glucose, and blood lipids). Of the 80 enrolled, 61 completed the study (intervention: 31, control: 30) with 19 dropping out due to poor treatment compliance. After 12 weeks, the participants receiving the GA showed significant decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fat-free body mass, energy and carbohydrate consumption, and fasting plasma glucose, as well as increased intake of dietary fiber. They also reported improvements in self-perceived bloating and quality of bowel movements, as well as a decreased appetite score following GA consumption. These results suggest that GA could be a safe and beneficial adjunct to other treatments for those with, or at risk of, metabolic syndrome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Dietary Cameroonian Plants Exhibit Anti-Inflammatory Activity in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3787; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123787 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 515
Abstract
In Cameroon, local plants are traditionally used as remedies for a variety of ailments. In this regard, several papers report health benefits of Cameroonian spices, which include antioxidant and anti-microbial properties, whereas gastric anti-inflammatory activities have never been previously considered. The present study [...] Read more.
In Cameroon, local plants are traditionally used as remedies for a variety of ailments. In this regard, several papers report health benefits of Cameroonian spices, which include antioxidant and anti-microbial properties, whereas gastric anti-inflammatory activities have never been previously considered. The present study investigates the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of hydro-alcoholic extracts of eleven Cameroonian spices in gastric epithelial cells (AGS and GES-1 cells). The extracts showed antioxidant properties in a cell-free system and reduced H2O2-induced ROS generation in gastric epithelial cells. After preliminary screening on TNFα-induced NF-κB driven transcription, six extracts from Xylopia parviflora, Xylopia aethiopica, Tetrapleura tetraptera, Dichrostachys glomerata, Aframomum melegueta, and Aframomum citratum were selected for further studies focusing on the anti-inflammatory activity. The extracts reduced the expression of some NF-κB-dependent pro-inflammatory mediators strictly involved in the gastric inflammatory process, such as IL-8, IL-6, and enzymes such as PTGS2 (COX-2), without affecting PTGS1 (COX-1). In conclusion, the selected extracts decreased pro-inflammatory markers by inhibiting the NF-κB signaling in gastric cells, justifying, in part, the traditional use of these spices. Other molecular mechanisms cannot be excluded, and further studies are needed to better clarify their biological activities at the gastric level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Oral Bovine Milk Lactoferrin Administration Suppressed Myopia Development through Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 in a Mouse Model
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3744; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123744 - 05 Dec 2020
Viewed by 661
Abstract
Recent studies have reported an association between myopia development and local ocular inflammation. Lactoferrin (LF) is an iron-binding protein present in saliva, tears, and mother’s milk. Furthermore, sequestering iron by LF can cause its antibacterial property. Moreover, LF has an anti-inflammatory effect. We [...] Read more.
Recent studies have reported an association between myopia development and local ocular inflammation. Lactoferrin (LF) is an iron-binding protein present in saliva, tears, and mother’s milk. Furthermore, sequestering iron by LF can cause its antibacterial property. Moreover, LF has an anti-inflammatory effect. We aimed to determine the suppressive effect of LF against the development and progress of myopia using a murine lens-induced myopia (LIM) model. We divided male C57BL/6J mice (3 weeks old) into two groups. While the experimental group was orally administered LF (1600 mg/kg/day, from 3-weeks-old to 7-weeks-old), a similar volume of Ringer’s solution was administered to the control group. We subjected the 4-week-old mice to −30 diopter lenses and no lenses on the right and left eyes, respectively. We measured the refraction and the axial length at baseline and 3 weeks after using a refractometer and a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system in both eyes. Furthermore, we determined the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity, and the amount of interleukin-6 (IL-6), MMP-2, and collagen 1A1 in the choroid or sclera. The eyes with a minus lens showed a refractive error shift and an axial length elongation in the control group, thus indicating the successful induction of myopia. However, there were no significant differences in the aforementioned parameters in the LF group. While LIM increased IL-6 expression and MMP-2 activity, it decreased collagen 1A1 content. However, orally administered LF reversed these effects. Thus, oral administration of LF suppressed lens-induced myopia development by modifying the extracellular matrix remodeling through the IL-6–MMP-2 axis in mice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
AphaMax®, an Aphanizomenon Flos-Aquae Aqueous Extract, Exerts Intestinal Protective Effects in Experimental Colitis in Rats
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3635; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123635 - 26 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 996
Abstract
Background: Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) is a unicellular cyanobacterium considered to be a “superfood” for its complete nutritional profile and beneficial properties. We investigated possible beneficial effects of an AFA extract, commercialized as AphaMax®, containing concentrated amount of phycocyanins and phytochrome, in [...] Read more.
Background: Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) is a unicellular cyanobacterium considered to be a “superfood” for its complete nutritional profile and beneficial properties. We investigated possible beneficial effects of an AFA extract, commercialized as AphaMax®, containing concentrated amount of phycocyanins and phytochrome, in 2,4 dinitrobenzensulfonic acid(DNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Methods: Effects of preventive oral treatment of AphaMax® (20, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day) in colitic rats were assessed and then macroscopic and microscopic analyses were performed to evaluate the inflammation degree. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and NF-κB, pro-inflammatory citockines, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2), and inducible NOS (iNOS) levels of expression were determined, as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrite levels. Results: AphaMax® treatment attenuated the severity of colitis ameliorating clinical signs. AphaMax® reduced the histological colonic damage and decreased MPO activity, NF-κB activation, as well as iNOS and COX-2 expression. AphaMax® treatment improved the altered immune response associated with colonic inflammation reducing IL-1β, IL-6 expression. Lastly, AphaMax® reduced oxidative stress, decreasing ROS and nitrite levels. Conclusions: Preventive treatment with AphaMax® attenuates the severity of the inflammation in DNBS colitis rats involving decrease of the NF-kB activation, reduction of iNOS and COX-2 expression, and inhibition of oxidative stress. Due its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant proprieties AphaMax® could be a good candidate as a complementary drug in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Euglena gracilis Intake on Mood and Autonomic Activity under Mental Workload, and Subjective Sleep Quality: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3243; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113243 - 23 Oct 2020
Viewed by 1073
Abstract
While the human body maintains homeostasis by altering the balance in the autonomic nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, a prolonged imbalance in these systems can result in physical and mental symptoms, including a decline in sleep quality and work efficiency. Euglenagracilis ( [...] Read more.
While the human body maintains homeostasis by altering the balance in the autonomic nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, a prolonged imbalance in these systems can result in physical and mental symptoms, including a decline in sleep quality and work efficiency. Euglenagracilis (Euglena) is a single-celled microalga with the properties of both plants and animals and contains abundant nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and fatty acids, which have various beneficial health effects. This study evaluated the effects of Euglena intake on the mood states and stress coping under mental workload tasks, and subjective sleep quality. We assigned men and women aged 20 to 64 years to Euglena and placebo intake groups, and measured indices related to the autonomic nervous system, psychological states, and sleep quality together with the application of workload stress before food intake, and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after commencing intake. Euglena intake regulated the autonomic nervous system under a workload and improved psychological parameters and sleep conditions. These results indicate that the consumption of Euglena may regulate the balance of the autonomic nervous system during stress and may have a favorable effect on psychological status and sleep quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Anti-Obesity Effect of DKB-117 through the Inhibition of Pancreatic Lipase and α-Amylase Activity
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3053; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103053 - 06 Oct 2020
Viewed by 800
Abstract
This study sought to evaluate the effects of Phaseolus multiflorus var. albus Bailey extract (PM extract) and Pleurotus eryngii var. ferulae extract (PF extract) on the inhibition of digestive enzymes and to confirm the anti-obesity effect of DKB-117 (a mixture of PM extract [...] Read more.
This study sought to evaluate the effects of Phaseolus multiflorus var. albus Bailey extract (PM extract) and Pleurotus eryngii var. ferulae extract (PF extract) on the inhibition of digestive enzymes and to confirm the anti-obesity effect of DKB-117 (a mixture of PM extract and PF extract) in digestive enzyme inhibition in a mouse model of obesity induced by a high-fat diet. In in vitro studies, PM extract and PF extract have increased dose-dependent inhibitory activity on α-amylase (Inhibitory concentration (IC50 value: 6.13 mg/mL)) and pancreatic lipase (IC50 value; 1.68 mg/mL), respectively. High-fat diet–induced obese mice were orally administered DKB-117 extracts at concentrations of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg/day, while a positive control group was given orlistat (pancreatic lipase inhibitor) and Garcinia cambogia (inhibiting the enzymes needed to synthesize carbohydrates into fat) at concentrations of 40 and 200 mg/kg/day, respectively, for eight weeks. As a result, body weight, fat mass (total fat mass, abdominal fat, and subcutaneous fat) detected with microcomputed tomography, fat mass (abdominal fat and inguinal fat) after an autopsy, and liver triglyceride levels were decreased significantly in the DKB-117 (300 mg/kg/day) group compared to those in the HFD control group. Additionally, we obtained results indicating that the presence of carbohydrates was found more in the DKB-117-300 (300 mg/kg/day) group than in the HFD control group. These data clearly show that DKB-117 extracts are expected to have an anti-obesity effect through a complex mechanism that promotes carbohydrate release through the inhibition of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes while blocking lipid absorption through lipase inhibition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Soy Isoflavone Genistein Inhibits an Axillary Osmidrosis Risk Factor ABCC11: In Vitro Screening and Fractional Approach for ABCC11-Inhibitory Activities in Plant Extracts and Dietary Flavonoids
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2452; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082452 - 14 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1154
Abstract
Axillary osmidrosis (AO) is a common chronic skin condition characterized by unpleasant body odors emanating from the armpits, and its aetiology is not fully understood. AO can seriously impair the psychosocial well-being of the affected individuals; however, no causal therapy has been established [...] Read more.
Axillary osmidrosis (AO) is a common chronic skin condition characterized by unpleasant body odors emanating from the armpits, and its aetiology is not fully understood. AO can seriously impair the psychosocial well-being of the affected individuals; however, no causal therapy has been established for it other than surgical treatment. Recent studies have revealed that human ATP-binding cassette transporter C11 (ABCC11) is an AO risk factor when it is expressed in the axillary apocrine glands—the sources of the offensive odors. Hence, identifying safe ways to inhibit ABCC11 may offer a breakthrough in treating AO. We herein screened for ABCC11-inhibitory activities in 34 natural products derived from plants cultivated for human consumption using an in vitro assay system to measure the ABCC11-mediated transport of radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S—an ABCC11 substrate). The water extract of soybean (Glycine max) was found to exhibit the strongest transport inhibition. From this extract, via a fractionation approach, we successfully isolated and identified genistein, a soy isoflavone, as a novel ABCC11 inhibitor with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration value of 61.5 μM. Furthermore, we examined the effects of other dietary flavonoids on the ABCC11-mediated DHEA-S transport to uncover the effects of these phytochemicals on ABCC11 function. While further human studies are needed, our findings here about the natural compounds will help develop a non-surgical therapy for AO. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessCommunication
Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Inhibit the Function of Human URAT1, a Renal Urate Re-Absorber
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1601; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061601 - 29 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1471
Abstract
The beneficial effects of fatty acids (FAs) on human health have attracted widespread interest. However, little is known about the impact of FAs on the handling of urate, the end-product of human purine metabolism, in the body. Increased serum urate levels occur in [...] Read more.
The beneficial effects of fatty acids (FAs) on human health have attracted widespread interest. However, little is known about the impact of FAs on the handling of urate, the end-product of human purine metabolism, in the body. Increased serum urate levels occur in hyperuricemia, a disease that can lead to gout. In humans, urate filtered by the glomerulus of the kidney is majorly re-absorbed from primary urine into the blood via the urate transporter 1 (URAT1)-mediated pathway. URAT1 inhibition, thus, contributes to decreasing serum urate concentration by increasing net renal urate excretion. Here, we investigated the URAT1-inhibitory effects of 25 FAs that are commonly contained in foods or produced in the body. For this purpose, we conducted an in vitro transport assay using cells transiently expressing URAT1. Our results showed that unsaturated FAs, especially long-chain unsaturated FAs, inhibited URAT1 more strongly than saturated FAs. Among the tested unsaturated FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid, α-linolenic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid exhibited substantial URAT1-inhibitory activities, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 6.0, 14.2, and 15.2 μM, respectively. Although further studies are required to investigate whether the ω-3 polyunsaturated FAs can be employed as uricosuric agents, our findings further confirm FAs as nutritionally important substances influencing human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Shea Nut Oil Extracts Enhance the Intra-Articular Sodium Hyaluronate Effectiveness on Surgically Induced OA Progression in Rats
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 957; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040957 - 30 Mar 2020
Viewed by 1142
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) progression is associated with joint pain and stiffness. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (IAHA) injection in knee OA restores the viscoelasticity of the joint and prevents cartilage damage. Shea nut oil extract (SNO) was shown to provide chondroprotection on surgically-induced OA progression in [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA) progression is associated with joint pain and stiffness. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (IAHA) injection in knee OA restores the viscoelasticity of the joint and prevents cartilage damage. Shea nut oil extract (SNO) was shown to provide chondroprotection on surgically-induced OA progression in rats. Here we aim to examine IAHA injection supplemented with SNO diet for a synergetic evaluation on the disease progression in OA rats. We employed an anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy-induced knee OA rat model with up to 12 weeks of sign/behavior observation (knee width, weight-bearing) and histological assessments of joint damage. We found both IAHA and SNO alone significantly attenuated histological changes of cartilage degeneration and synovial reactions in these knee OA rats. Nonetheless, oral SNO alone mitigated OA pain and inflammation while IAHA alone had no significant impact on the weight-bearing test and knee joint swelling. Moreover, with IAHA-treated rats fed with oral SNO diet, additional anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects were found, which further enhanced and maintained IAHA protection. Given the differential phenotype of oral SNO vs. IAHA, a regimen of IAHA coupled with SNO supplement provides a long-term effect of IAHA treatment. Taken together, the SNO supplement can be safely used as an adjuvant diet for chronic symptomatic relief of OA coupled with IAHA management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
FlexPro MD®, a Combination of Krill Oil, Astaxanthin and Hyaluronic Acid, Reduces Pain Behavior and Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Osteoarthritis in Rats
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 956; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040956 - 30 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1845
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. Since there is no cure for OA and no effective treatment to slow its progression, current pharmacologic treatments, such as analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), only alleviate symptoms, [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. Since there is no cure for OA and no effective treatment to slow its progression, current pharmacologic treatments, such as analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), only alleviate symptoms, such as pain and inflammation, but do not inhibit the disease process. Moreover, chronic intake of these drugs may result in severe adverse effects. For these reasons, patients have turned to the use of various complementary and alternative approaches, including diverse dietary supplements and nutraceuticals, in an effort to improve symptoms and manage or slow disease progression. The present study was conducted to evaluate the anti-osteoarthritic effects of FlexPro MD® (a mixture of krill oil, astaxanthin, and hyaluronic acid; FP-MD) in a rat model of OA induced by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA). FP-MD significantly ameliorated joint pain and decreased the severity of articular cartilage destruction in rats that received oral supplementation for 7 days prior to MIA administration and for 21 days thereafter. Furthermore, FP-MD treatment significantly reduced serum levels of the articular cartilage degeneration biomarkers cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and crosslinked C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II), and the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), as well as mRNA expression levels of inflammatory mediators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix-degrading enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, in the knee joint tissue. Our findings suggest that FP-MD is a promising dietary supplement for reducing pain, minimizing cartilage damage, and improving functional status in OA, without the disadvantages of previous dietary supplements and medicinal agents, including multiple adverse effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Discovery of Nobiletin from Citrus Peel as a Potent Inhibitor of β-Amyloid Peptide Toxicity
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2648; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112648 - 04 Nov 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1567
Abstract
Increasing evidence has demonstrated that amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), evokes oxidative and inflammatory cascades, which ultimately lead to the death of neurons. The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the effect of nobiletin, a representative compound [...] Read more.
Increasing evidence has demonstrated that amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), evokes oxidative and inflammatory cascades, which ultimately lead to the death of neurons. The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the effect of nobiletin, a representative compound of citrus peel, in preventive and therapeutic approaches against neuronal damage by exposure to Aβ25–35. Nobiletin significantly ameliorated Aβ25–35-mediated cell death by restoring abnormal changes in intracellular oxidative stress, cell cycle, nuclear morphology, and activity of apoptotic caspase. Regarding anti-inflammatory responses, nobiletin significantly suppressed interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide (NO), and prostaglandin E2 production in response to Aβ stimulation. Moreover, nobiletin inhibited Aβ-stimulated inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression, which was attributed to the blockade of nuclear factor-κB p65 and phosphorylation of its inhibitor, IκB-α. Interestingly, nobiletin decreased expression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 without affecting extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. Taken together, the novel data implicate nobiletin as a potential candidate for the prevention of AD through the inhibition of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Risks Associated with the Use of Garcinia as a Nutritional Complement to Lose Weight
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020450 - 29 Jan 2021
Viewed by 815
Abstract
Nowadays, obesity is one of the great nutritional problems facing public health. The prevalence of this pathology has increased in a worrying way over recent years, currently reaching epidemic proportions. In this context, nutritional supplements are presented as a therapeutic alternative to which [...] Read more.
Nowadays, obesity is one of the great nutritional problems facing public health. The prevalence of this pathology has increased in a worrying way over recent years, currently reaching epidemic proportions. In this context, nutritional supplements are presented as a therapeutic alternative to which more and more people are turning to. Nutritional supplements to lose weight based on the Garcinia plant, specifically on Garcinia cambogia, are commonly used. The active principle of this plant to which these properties have been attributed, is hydroxycitric acid (HCA). The aim of the present review is to gather reported data concerning the effectiveness of nutritional supplements based on Garcinia extracts on weight loss and their possible negative effects. Contradictory results have been observed regarding the effectiveness of the supplements. While statistically significant weight loss was observed in some studies, no changes were found in others. Regarding safety, although Garcinia supplements have been revealed as safe in the vast majority of the studies carried out in animal models and humans, some cases of hepatotoxicity, serotonin toxicity and mania have been reported. In conclusion, the results suggest that Garcinia-based supplements could be effective in short-term weight loss, although the data are not conclusive. In addition, the safety of the complement should be further studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessReview
Macroalgae—A Sustainable Source of Chemical Compounds with Biological Activities
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3085; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103085 - 11 Oct 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1035
Abstract
Nowadays, one of the most important research directions that concerns the scientific world is to exploit the earth’s resources in a sustainable way. Considering the increasing interest in finding new sources of bioactive molecules and functional products, many research studies focused their interest [...] Read more.
Nowadays, one of the most important research directions that concerns the scientific world is to exploit the earth’s resources in a sustainable way. Considering the increasing interest in finding new sources of bioactive molecules and functional products, many research studies focused their interest on demonstrating the sustainability of exploiting marine macroalgal biomass as feedstock for wastewater treatment and natural fertilizer, conversion into green biofuels, active ingredients in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products, or even for the production of functional ingredients and integration in the human food chain. The objective of the present paper was to provide an overview on the recent progress in the exploitation of different macroalgae species as a source of bioactive compounds, mainly emphasizing the latter published data regarding their potential bioactivities, health benefits, and industrial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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Open AccessReview
Potential of Chlorella as a Dietary Supplement to Promote Human Health
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2524; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092524 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2025
Abstract
Chlorella is a green unicellular alga that is commercially produced and distributed worldwide as a dietary supplement. Chlorella products contain numerous nutrients and vitamins, including D and B12, that are absent in plant-derived food sources. Chlorella contains larger amounts of folate [...] Read more.
Chlorella is a green unicellular alga that is commercially produced and distributed worldwide as a dietary supplement. Chlorella products contain numerous nutrients and vitamins, including D and B12, that are absent in plant-derived food sources. Chlorella contains larger amounts of folate and iron than other plant-derived foods. Chlorella supplementation to mammals, including humans, has been reported to exhibit various pharmacological activities, including immunomodulatory, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and antihyperlipidemic activities. Meta-analysis on the effects of Chlorella supplementation on cardiovascular risk factors have suggested that it improves total cholesterol levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose levels but not triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. These beneficial effects of Chlorella might be due to synergism between multiple nutrient and antioxidant compounds. However, information regarding the bioactive compounds in Chlorella is limited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Dietary Supplements and Healthy Foods)
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